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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Kids & Family Talk 
Thread started 31 Aug 2010 (Tuesday) 02:53
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Average PP time per image?

 
Traci
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Aug 31, 2010 02:53 |  #1

I was wondering how much time people spend on PP per image? I edited 22 images last night and spent about 3 hours I'm guessing. Roughly 10 minutes per image. I'm just wondering if I am on track with everyone else :)

Also, I am very skilled in Photoshop but have never used ACR. Would I save tons of time by using ACR? I'm not excited about having to use 2 programs to do similar things I can do in photoshop but if it saves time, I should look into it. Same with LightRoom, I am looking into getting this as well. What do others think?


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linda ­ baca
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Aug 31, 2010 14:42 |  #2

I would like to know as well. I feel like I'm spending wayyyy too much time in PP. I use PS (not mastered it yet) but I just started using LR and feel like I'm spinning my wheels and being redundant. But if this is the best workflow for others I'm willing to give it a try! Thank you :)


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FlyingPhotog
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Aug 31, 2010 14:47 |  #3

You can save tons of (processing) time by putting in as much effort as possible on the front end and getting it as right as possible in the camera.


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kilr95ss
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Aug 31, 2010 14:53 as a reply to  @ FlyingPhotog's post |  #4

^ Agree! When I first started getting serious about photography, I didn't put a lot of time into setting up the shots, but after spending too much time in front of the pc cleaning up the images, I realized it is much easier to get it right to begin with.


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linda ­ baca
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Aug 31, 2010 15:19 |  #5

Agreed. But what about those of us who are still learning and in the interim still need to PP?

FlyingPhotog wrote in post #10824388 (external link)
You can save tons of (processing) time by putting in as much effort as possible on the front end and getting it as right as possible in the camera.


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FlyingPhotog
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Aug 31, 2010 15:38 |  #6

I honestly don't even know how to begin to answer that question Linda. I truly don't...

If someone is that dependent on processing, then they need to go back to square one and figure out how to be better photographers first.


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Traci
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Aug 31, 2010 17:27 as a reply to  @ FlyingPhotog's post |  #7

So is 10 minutes per photo more time than most people spend?


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D ­ Thompson
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Aug 31, 2010 19:48 |  #8

Traci wrote in post #10825226 (external link)
So is 10 minutes per photo more time than most people spend?

It depends on what steps you are doing. I've spent anywhere from 20-30 seconds doing basic stuff to several hours on a retouch. ACR can be a real time saver. You can adjust one image and apply those settings to the rest in a few seconds.


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lil_miss
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Aug 31, 2010 23:44 |  #9

I'd say a few minutes max.. maybe not even that.. sometimes 5.. but never 10 unless it was a work of art with a huge amount of layers or something crazy.


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caught14
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Sep 03, 2010 09:45 as a reply to  @ lil_miss's post |  #10

Average Times
This question has a lot of "it depends" answers. On average I will only spend about a 1 minute on each image. Most images are less than this (20-30 seconds) but I'll have the occasional image that I'll spend 5-10 minutes on if I really like it and want to do more involved retouching/editing/enh​ancing. I probably spend more time culling my images than I do editing them. (I'm admittedly slow, it usually takes me 60-75 minutes to cull a 400-image shoot down to the final 40 or 50 I present to a client)

Editing Software
I do 90-95% of all my editing and retouching in Lightroom. I only use Photoshop for the really detailed stuff (major retouching/cloning, composite images, texture overlays, etc.) Adobe has done a really good job of making a lot of the features I use in PS available in LR. I rely on presets and use their tools for selective dodging and burning quite often. LR also makes it easy to apply settings to similar images very easy (Previous button in the Develop module and Sync Settings in the Library module). These can be a big time saver.

When I first started several years ago, I was definitely spending more time than I am now on each image. At least 5-10 minutes. Usually it was because I was trying to rescue an image that I hadn't captured in camera correctly. Sure I wrote actions in PS and presets in LR to help, but in reality the best option is to work at improving your ability to make sure you get it right in camera first. This pays much bigger dividends on the back end than anything. Even someone just starting out can do a few basic things to help in this area; you don't have to be an advanced user or a professional.

Suggestions of things that have helped me


  1. Understand the basics of a good exposure (Aperture, Shutter Speed, ISO). Then take a little extra time to position your subjects to have good light on them (I still use the technique to hold out my hand to find the light). As an example, find good open shade when the lighting is harsh. Good lighting trumps a good background any day.
  2. Learn how to use M mode on your camera. I used to use Av but I would end up with all kinds of different exposures, even for the same scene. This is a pain because it takes longer in post processing since there's not consistency between even similar images.
  3. Use a reflector. Seems simple but can altogether eliminate the need for having to try and create digital fill.
  4. Get your white balance right in camera - Either use a digital calibration target (I use ones from PhotoVision (external link)) or manually set your white balance. This takes some time to learn, but establishes consistency between images. The AWB on Canon's cameras aren't known for being awesome.
  5. Value quality over quantity. Shooting more doesn't yield a higher % of keepers. Take the time to chimp your shots. Develop a critical eye for details -- it's much easier to simply have your subjects fix hair fly aways, toss their gum, and straighten wrinkled shirts and take another picture than it is to spend hours trying Photoshop it out later.
This is certainly not an exhaustive list, but they are things that helped me and made a huge difference in helping to reduce time spent on the back end doing PP. My time is valuable and I can't be as effective or profitable if it takes me forever to PP all my images, especially with weddings when we come home with 2,500-3,000 images from those events.

Hope this helps. Like anything, with more practice comes speed and efficiency.

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Traci
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Sep 03, 2010 22:16 |  #11

Thank you "caught14"! I loved your information. I agree that in the past I may have been spending time trying to salvage images, but I recently bought a new lens and my images are a much higher quality just from that. I went from a sigma lens to the canon 24-70 2.8L. BUT i have to say, I still spend time on my images "styling" them, and I am pretty picky.


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Justiss
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Sep 06, 2010 19:08 |  #12

I only spend a few minutes per image, 10 minutes max on 'normal' images where I'm just tweaking contrast or adjusting curves. If I am trying to remove a tree or something in the background, then it takes a little longer.

I totally agree about spending time to get it right in camera. Someone on here posted something along these lines: If you are about to take a shot thinking, I'll fix that later in PS, then don't. I think it's pretty good advice. :) However, I take pictures of a lot of kids, and dogs, and many times it's just not possible to move the subject to the perfect light, sometimes the subject moves, or RUNS away and you do the best you can. :lol:


Kathryn

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xcel730
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Sep 07, 2010 15:50 as a reply to  @ Justiss's post |  #13

If I just need to do just the basics (contrast, brightness, saturation, sharpness, etc) I do it in Lightroom and spend a few minutes on each photos (less if they were all shot in the same location and I could do batch processing).

However, I do enjoy post processing and sometimes I'll spend a few hours on a single photo to get the image the way I want.


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Average PP time per image?
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