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FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos RAW, Post Processing & Printing 
Thread started 13 Oct 2010 (Wednesday) 11:43
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DPP or LIghtroom 3 for me ?

 
tacomadm18
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Oct 13, 2010 11:43 |  #1

So here's my question, I'm sure there is no right or wrong answer, but I'm wondering what makes more sense for the future.

I'm currently using Canon DPP 3.9, I shoot RAW, and I use Picasa 3 to organize my photo's etc,,, I'm using Picasa because I just like it and have gotten use to using it. I have a workflow that work well for me, at least at this point.

Does it make more sense to switch to Lightroom 3. Yes, it will be a learning curve, but since I haven't really used it, I'm not sure how it stacks up against DPP. Also, I'm not sure how the organization of photos stacks up against Picasa 3.

So I guess it's one of those; if it's not broken don't fix it OR Lightroom 3 will give you greater benefits down the road once you get use to using it.

thanks, thoughts




  
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tonylong
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Oct 13, 2010 11:52 |  #2

Well, there are plenty of good reasons for using Lightroom since it is both a powerful Raw processor and an integrated workflow/photo management tool. But, what is best for you? Typically, people move to Lightroom when they reach a level of "seriousness" about both the amount they shoot and their workflow needs.

The best advice I can give is take some time to read up on Lightroom and then go for the free 30 day trial. There is plenty to read -- here on the forum doing a search for Lightroom will give you hours and hours of reading, a Google search will give you months of reading! Also, there are very good "standard" Lightroom books -- Martin Evening, Scott Kelby and Victoria Bampton are three authors who keep up to date and I'd consider any or all of them as a worthy addition to your library. Believe me, it's worth it to learn as much as you can, both before delving into Lightroom and as you get started.

Also, Lightroom Help is a very good "users guide" and is available online from Adobe as a .pdf. Just search for "lightroom help pdf" -- and I'd say that would be an excellent starting point for a basic knowledge base.


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Riveredger
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Oct 13, 2010 12:58 |  #3

I use the same two applications - DPP and Picasa 3. I find them perfectly adequate for my needs - but I rarely if ever print anything. All of my uses are online. That said, I did try some Adobe products and find them very slow to load and overly complex to use. I know they are the gold standard for image editing, but I think that you should make sure you need something that they offer before spending the money on the software and the time to learn how to use it before jumping in.


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h14nha
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Oct 14, 2010 06:30 |  #4

I was in the same boat as you about 6 weeks ago. I had DPP and Elements 7 ( which I hated - found it too complicated for a beginner ). I got Lightroom 3, and, when I first started using it, found it couldnt touch the quick few adjustments I could do with DPP for the same or poorer results. I decided to stick with it though, and now I'm glad I did, because I now find it superb.
It can do so much more than DPP so it will be worth toughing it out. Thats not to say I've given up on DPP though. I still use it for little easy quick fixes, as,the major downside of LR3 is its slooooooow speed. Now that may have something to do with my laptop but I do find it a pain, but its the only downside.
Hope thats been helpful to you,
Good Luck !!
PS,
Welcome to POTN


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Medic82
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Oct 14, 2010 07:20 |  #5

h14nha wrote in post #11094538 (external link)
the major downside of LR3 is its slooooooow speed.

Then you need to upgrade your computer


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fensterbme
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Oct 14, 2010 07:55 |  #6

There is no hard or fast rule on this...

Questions I'd ask you are:

1.) How much do you shoot, how much time do you spend editing? - The more you shoot and edit the more you will benefit from Adobe Lightroom

2.) What is your experience, skill level, technical aptitude? The more serious you are about your images and the more skilled you get in capturing things the more likely you are to realize what all Lightroom will do for you. I have seen a number of beginners who aren't 'techies' who start using it and don't see the benefits in what one can do with the images in the Develop module, or understand fully why they would would need all the organizational stuff. If someone is a techie, they will likley see the benefits even if someone a photography noob.

For me Lightroom is the center of my digital photography world. It's been an amazing tool speeding up my workflow and helping me keep my almost 4TB of images organized.

h14nha wrote in post #11094538 (external link)
the major downside of LR3 is its slooooooow speed.

+ 1 That you need an upgrade on the Computer

Lightroom can definately give one's computer a workout, especially if working with a lot of RAW files from the newer camera's. You will want 4GB of memory at least, a pretty decent CPU and the quicker the disks the better.


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e02937
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Oct 14, 2010 08:03 |  #7

I have both and I found I really didn't really like lightroom. I use DPP and love it for it's power, results, but also relative simplicity. I don't think using DPP is a knock on your seriousness. Tony has a great suggestion though, the 30 day free trial is absolutely the best way to find out if lightroom can work for you.

I use DPP + Bridge for organization + CS4 for pixel level editing, etc, I think it's a winning combination.


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Riveredger
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Oct 14, 2010 09:20 |  #8

Medic82 wrote in post #11094700 (external link)
Then you need to upgrade your computer

It will still be slower than using DPP. I have a quad-core CPU, dedicated GeForce 8800 GTS graphics and 4 GB RAM and still find Adobe products slow to use and especially to load. DPP starts up and is ready to go almost instantly, on the other hand.


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tonylong
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Oct 14, 2010 09:35 |  #9

It's true that Lightroom does a lot of "stuff" to get the interface to work properly. For example it has to manage previews and metadata (including processing info and things like Exif data and keyword data) so that you can move not just from image to image but from Library to Develop, instead of just viewing thumbnails until you double-click an image to open it, like DPP and most other apps do, or right-clicking to view exif info.

So yeah, there can be a performance "hit" to get the integrated benefits of LR. Whether it's worth it to you really is up to you, and has a lot to do with your work and workflow.


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h14nha
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Oct 14, 2010 13:17 |  #10

Medic82 wrote in post #11094700 (external link)
Then you need to upgrade your computer

Your probably right but I can turn my laptop on from standby and be on line in about 15 seconds which is pretty rapid. I have 1gb of ram and a 250 HDD.
I have about 20 gig left before its full up mind.:(
I use DPP when I want a quick fix and LR3 when I want to do anything extensive.


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fensterbme
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Oct 14, 2010 13:41 |  #11

Riveredger wrote in post #11089712 (external link)
I know they are the gold standard for image editing, but I think that you should make sure you need something that they offer before spending the money on the software and the time to learn how to use it before jumping in.

This is good advice... if you don't have a need it can be best to keep it simple. If someone is a casual shooter who does some 'mild' processing and only edits a handful of images at a time Canon DPP is okay to use. Sometimes more isn't better... I'm a big fan of keep it simple as you can.

The jump from Canon DPP and Picasa to Lightroom and Photoshop is quite a jump. Things are more complex, but also massively more powerful. I will say that Lightroom is pretty easy to get used to and be up and working in pretty short order. Watching a few of the videos on Adobe's site, and reading a few web articles should give more than enough information to get most users working at a level where they will really enjoy what Lightroom gives them. So while Photoshop can be daunting when first starting out, I don't think the same applies to Lightroom, it's tons easier to use.

Riveredger wrote in post #11095309 (external link)
It will still be slower than using DPP. I have a quad-core CPU, dedicated GeForce 8800 GTS graphics and 4 GB RAM and still find Adobe products slow to use and especially to load. DPP starts up and is ready to go almost instantly, on the other hand.

Indeed, DPP will always load faster regardless of the hardware because Canon DPP is a much smaller application that does a whole lot less, so one should expect it to always run slower when compared to a much larger application that does a lot more.

I could also see that someone could find Adobe applications slow to use in terms of how long it takes to get something accomplished... especially if the person is a beginner or more specifically isn't familiar of how to use the tools. If someone has a good understanding of the tools, Adobe can be quite fast to get things done. Additionally least for me, what the image looks like matters a ton more than how quickly the application loaded that I used to edit it.

Finally with regards to what makes a machine fast/slow... The vast majority of the time your computer is slow/fast based on the speed of the storage on the computer. If you have a computer that doesn't have enough free space on the disk, is highly fragmented or otherwise is just slow one will noticed things run a good bit slower than they do if the storage is faster. Most of the time the CPU is waiting around on the much slower storage to read or write a file.

Also the speed of your graphics card has zero to do with the speed of how fast your able to edit photos, use... photographers don't really need any special kind of video card.


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Riveredger
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Oct 14, 2010 17:41 |  #12

fensterbme wrote in post #11096753 (external link)
Also the speed of your graphics card has zero to do with the speed of how fast your able to edit photos, use... photographers don't really need any special kind of video card.

http://kb2.adobe.com/c​ps/405/kb405445.html (external link)

"Many of the Adobe Creative Suite 4 applications have enhanced features designed to take advantage of your display card's GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) to accelerate application performance. The GPU is a dedicated graphics rendering chip that may be integrated into the computer motherboard or attached to a separate video display card and is very efficient at manipulating and outputting computer graphics. The extra processing power of the GPU makes some effects and accelerated rendering possible that would otherwise require extraordinary CPU (Central Processing Unit) speeds and large amounts of RAM. If a supported GPU is detected during launch, the application will take advantage of this added processing power."

I am not certain, but I believe Lightroom also has the ability to offload tasks to the GPU.


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Riveredger
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Oct 14, 2010 17:44 |  #13

h14nha wrote in post #11096630 (external link)
.
I have about 20 gig left before its full up .

This is a no-no in computer land ;) You want to keep at least 30% of your hard drive space free or you will notice a severe decrease in performance.


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MGiddings ­ Photography
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Oct 14, 2010 20:12 |  #14

If you are using Canon lenses then DPP is the best at processing raw images. It produces the best colour and best noise reduction and will correct your Canon lenses such as CA, colour blue, distortion etc. I find it fast. There are a group of lesson on YouTube that will show you all you need to know.

I convert using DPP and then edit elsewhere.


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fensterbme
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Oct 14, 2010 20:18 |  #15

Riveredger wrote in post #11098086 (external link)
http://kb2.adobe.com/c​ps/405/kb405445.html (external link)

"Many of the Adobe Creative Suite 4 applications have enhanced features designed to take advantage of your display card's GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) to accelerate application performance. .......

..... If a supported GPU is detected during launch, the application will take advantage of this added processing power."

I am not certain, but I believe Lightroom also has the ability to offload tasks to the GPU.

Well supporting GPU off-load for some specific certain tasks does allow for the *potential* to make having a faster video card an advantage. But does that actually translate into making Photoshop run faster?

... the answer is not really, and in a good number of cases it actually decreases performance. There are a number of issues and pitfalls when using these features ([URL="http://kb2.adob​e.com/cps/404/kb404898​.html"]see here or [URL="http://kb2.adobe​.com/cps/408/kb408466.​html"]here also) and in fact at least on the Macintosh enabling the feature actually makes [URL="http://diglloyd.​com/diglloyd/2008-10-blog.html#_20081025Ado​beCS4OpenGL"]things slower.

So when I was saying that it didn't make any difference, I was talking about actual real world experience... not what Adobe's marketing states. Which is why I said that the graphics card doesn't make a difference... If someone wants to increase the Photoshop performance on a given computer, putting in a faster video card isn't going to be a good use of cash. I too was excited when I saw Adobe allow the GPU to help in some of the heavy lifting, but hopes were dashed when the real world didn't line up with what Adobe promised.

Adobe does a lot right, but under the hood of their applications things are a hot mess more often than not... Ever wondered why it takes so long to save PSD's in Photoshop, because the operation only uses a single CPU and hasn't been recoded in a decade, so on my Hex Core Mac Pro the all the power goes to waste.

But even if it *did* work well it would only increase performance on a handful of features that some folks may or may not use (in my understanding).


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DPP or LIghtroom 3 for me ?
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