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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
Thread started 14 Oct 2010 (Thursday) 10:08
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Magnesium vs. Plastic Body Construction

 
ingraman
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Oct 25, 2010 13:14 as a reply to  @ post 11161248 |  #106

It's more a prestige feature more than anything else. Same reason why Saturn cars with plastic doors didn't catch on. When you're buying a camera in the $1k+ range, it better be made out of premium materials. Plastics are considered cheap, even if the plastic strength matches metal strength. Anyhow, just another reason for Canon marketing to give us less for more in the name of product differentiation. Nikon at least kept the mag. body on the D7000.




  
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Lowner
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Oct 25, 2010 13:31 |  #107

I see the Bugatti Veyron has a mass of Carbon fibre body panels. I'd hardly call the Veyron cheap. Likewise F1 cars and MotoGP bikes, some even use "plastic" in the guts of the machinery, Ducatti use a carbon fibre rear swing arm for example. If its good enough for the Doctor, then its good enough for me.


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tkbslc
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Oct 25, 2010 13:35 |  #108

Somehow, carbon fiber is accepted as high quality, but other composites are considered "cheap", regardless of actual properties.


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Mundty
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Oct 25, 2010 13:36 |  #109

Lowner wrote in post #11161966 (external link)
I see the Bugatti Veyron has a mass of Carbon fibre body panels. I'd hardly call the Veyron cheap. Likewise F1 cars and MotoGP bikes, some even use "plastic" in the guts of the machinery, Ducatti use a carbon fibre rear swing arm for example. If its good enough for the Doctor, then its good enough for me.

Carbon Fiber is much more expensive than any Metal or Plastic... I'm not sure where you were going with that one, lol. It's also more durable than either of those Materials.


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tkbslc
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Oct 25, 2010 13:39 |  #110

realmike15 wrote in post #11162000 (external link)
Carbon Fiber is much more expensive than any Metal or Plastic... I'm not sure where you were going with that one, lol. It's also more durable than either of those Materials.

carbon fiber comes in many grades, just like aluminum and plastic.


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Mundty
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Oct 25, 2010 13:41 |  #111

tkbslc wrote in post #11162018 (external link)
carbon fiber comes in many grades, just like aluminum and plastic.

Yes, but not the stuff he's talking about... Like on the Veyron


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tkbslc
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Oct 25, 2010 13:44 |  #112

I would doubt the Veyron body panels are extremely strong. They are carbon primarily for weight savings, I would presume. The 80s Camaros used fiberglass composites for the same reason.


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Mundty
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Oct 25, 2010 13:46 |  #113

tkbslc wrote in post #11162053 (external link)
I would doubt the Veyron body panels are extremely strong. They are carbon primarily for weight savings, I would presume. The 80s Camaros used fiberglass composites for the same reason.

They are, that's the huge safety benefit of using carbon fiber. Not only is it more durable but it absorbs impact better. It's a a Safety thing as well as a Weight thing.


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RTPVid
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Oct 25, 2010 14:00 |  #114

ingraman wrote in post #11161834 (external link)
... Nikon at least kept the mag. body on the D7000.

Actually, no, they didn't. The D7000 is half plastic. My cynical mind assumes it is half-mag so their marketing material can say the magic word "magnesium".


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tkbslc
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Oct 25, 2010 14:12 |  #115

realmike15 wrote in post #11162067 (external link)
They are, that's the huge safety benefit of using carbon fiber. Not only is it more durable but it absorbs impact better. It's a a Safety thing as well as a Weight thing.

Carbon shatters when it is impacted beyond its design limits, so I really doubt this. A 200mph crash is going to leave tiny carbon fragments all over the place. The safety is in the interior cage of the car, which is likely NOT carbon.


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spiralspirit
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Oct 25, 2010 14:21 |  #116

carbon has a huge advantage in terms of strength/weight ratio, but does not do well with large shocks (it shatters) that plastic might happily deform and than return to normal. That being said I'm not sure that any impact that would shatter decent carbon fiber would be survivable by a poly body's electronics.


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RDKirk
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Oct 25, 2010 14:25 |  #117

tkbslc wrote in post #11162217 (external link)
Carbon shatters when it is impacted beyond its design limits, so I really doubt this. A 200mph crash is going to leave tiny carbon fragments all over the place. The safety is in the interior cage of the car, which is likely NOT carbon.

The ability to absorb impact by crumpling or redirecting force to crumple zones is also important. I don't think carbon fiber can do either, even in a low-to-medium-speed crash involving half a ton or more.

These days, it's true that nonmetallic body panels work just as well in terms of crash protection because it's the steel cage that's providing all the protection. Steel panels, however, are less expensive to repair than non-metallic panels--which is a function more of the available repair part distribution and repair technology than a characteristic inherent in the panel material itself.


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RDKirk
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Oct 25, 2010 14:28 |  #118

spiralspirit wrote in post #11162261 (external link)
carbon has a huge advantage in terms of strength/weight ratio, but does not do well with large shocks (it shatters) that plastic might happily deform and than return to normal. That being said I'm not sure that any impact that would shatter decent carbon fiber would be survivable by a poly body's electronics.

The late legendary camera technician Marty Forscher used to hammer a nail into a board with a Nikon F body and then take pictures with it. I'm doubtful you could do that with any modern DSLR even if the body withstood the hammering.


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gcogger
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Oct 25, 2010 14:31 |  #119

When Formula 1 cars moved from metal to carbon fibre for the tub and the nose cone, the cars became safer... Carbon fibre is actually very good at dissipating impact forces.


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tkbslc
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Oct 25, 2010 14:31 |  #120

RDKirk wrote in post #11162312 (external link)
The late legendary camera technician Marty Forscher used to hammer a nail into a board with a Nikon F body and then take pictures with it. I'm doubtful you could do that with any modern DSLR even if the body withstood the hammering.

I don't see how that is a knock to modern camera construction. If put a small hammer in my camera bag ($5 at the hardware store) then I can also hammer in a nail and then take a picture with my 30D. Why would I want to hammer in a nail with a camera when a $5 tool does the job better?


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Magnesium vs. Plastic Body Construction
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