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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Kids & Family Talk 
Thread started 25 Oct 2010 (Monday) 09:25
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Samples of large (10-15) family photos?

 
Michelle ­ Brooks ­ Photography
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Oct 25, 2010 09:25 |  #1

I have a family who've inquired about us doing a family session for them right after Xmas while the family is together--12 members aged 4mo - 97 yrs old. We do very candid, outdoors, un-posed sessions for the most part, tho of course we do some traditional, posed shots in our sessions, esp weddings. If any of you have family shots that have a nice, relaxed, casual feel to them I would love to see them to generate ideas on how we might tackle this, or a link to a site if you know of a photog who does work like this. I know with a small baby & at least one elderly person we're not going to be using hula hoops or doing "jump" shots, but I also don't want an Olan Mills look it. :lol: Thanks in advance!


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caught14
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Oct 29, 2010 13:49 |  #2

We've done a couple of these. They are not as bad as you might think. Assuming you will be outside, find yourself some good light and a good setting, and then set up people in family units. Not sure what all they are looking for, but here is a rough break down of generally how we have done it in the past:


  1. All families together (everyone smiling, then just tell them to have fun and gather in like they like each other)
  2. Family #1
  3. Family #1 individuals
  4. Family #1 groupings (parents, kids, etc.)
  5. Repeat steps 2-4 for each individual family unit
  6. Additional groupings such as all the kids, all the grandkids, grandparents with grandkids, etc.
Our goal is to provide everyone lots of opportunities to buy :-)

If you do these multi-family sessions right, they can be very lucrative. Families buy more because it's usually rare to have them all together in a good picture. Plus, often times the individual families aren't expecting to get an individual family session done, so they end up buying stuff for their own family too.

Colling Photography (external link)
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Michelle ­ Brooks ­ Photography
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Oct 31, 2010 14:57 |  #3

Priceless advice! Thanks so much! I often am not aware of things I can do to increase print sales. Great suggestions!

caught14 wrote in post #11188643 (external link)
We've done a couple of these. They are not as bad as you might think. Assuming you will be outside, find yourself some good light and a good setting, and then set up people in family units. Not sure what all they are looking for, but here is a rough break down of generally how we have done it in the past:

  1. All families together (everyone smiling, then just tell them to have fun and gather in like they like each other)
  2. Family #1
  3. Family #1 individuals
  4. Family #1 groupings (parents, kids, etc.)
  5. Repeat steps 2-4 for each individual family unit
  6. Additional groupings such as all the kids, all the grandkids, grandparents with grandkids, etc.
Our goal is to provide everyone lots of opportunities to buy :-)

If you do these multi-family sessions right, they can be very lucrative. Families buy more because it's usually rare to have them all together in a good picture. Plus, often times the individual families aren't expecting to get an individual family session done, so they end up buying stuff for their own family too.


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caught14
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Nov 01, 2010 12:24 as a reply to  @ Michelle Brooks Photography's post |  #4

Glad to help. Another thing that may be useful -- to keep things moving along, it really helps to have two people photographing. For the big group photo, have one of you (Tog A) get positioned with the camera settings all squared away (white balance, exposure, etc.) Meanwhile the other person (Tog B) is setting up the families for the shot. Once everyone is in place, Tog A can start taking the pictures while Tog B observes the people in the picture for any adjustments needed.

Once the big group photo is done, you can then use the same model for the individual families. Or you can split up and each photographer can be capturing separate families/groupings at the same time.

For both your sake and the clients, you don't want this to take all day. However, the goal shouldn't be to move them through as fast as possible. While photographing, we are taking the time to get to know the families and asking them lots of questions throughout the session to help them relax. The overall goal is to make this a positive experience for the client.


Colling Photography (external link)
Cameras & Lenses - Canon 5DMkII x 3 | 30D | 24
L | 35L | 45 TS | 50L | 85IIL | 135L | 16-35IIL | 24-105L | 70-200L
www.collingphotogaller​y.com (external link)

  
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Michelle ­ Brooks ­ Photography
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Nov 01, 2010 17:18 |  #5

Sounds like you've done this a few times! ;) Sure sounds like it would make for a nice, smooth flow. I will def try to implement your tips. Thanks, again!

caught14 wrote in post #11204642 (external link)
Glad to help. Another thing that may be useful -- to keep things moving along, it really helps to have two people photographing. For the big group photo, have one of you (Tog A) get positioned with the camera settings all squared away (white balance, exposure, etc.) Meanwhile the other person (Tog B) is setting up the families for the shot. Once everyone is in place, Tog A can start taking the pictures while Tog B observes the people in the picture for any adjustments needed.

Once the big group photo is done, you can then use the same model for the individual families. Or you can split up and each photographer can be capturing separate families/groupings at the same time.

For both your sake and the clients, you don't want this to take all day. However, the goal shouldn't be to move them through as fast as possible. While photographing, we are taking the time to get to know the families and asking them lots of questions throughout the session to help them relax. The overall goal is to make this a positive experience for the client.


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asysin2leads
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Nov 03, 2010 03:17 as a reply to  @ Michelle Brooks Photography's post |  #6

It is almost a necessity to have an extra person or 2 who understands your vision to help pose. The important thing, especially with a number of children, that YOU do the talking. If there are too many voices, the kids get confused as where to look and it just adds time to the shoot.


Kevin
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Michelle ­ Brooks ­ Photography
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Nov 03, 2010 06:13 |  #7

asysin2leads wrote in post #11215836 (external link)
It is almost a necessity to have an extra person or 2 who understands your vision to help pose. The important thing, especially with a number of children, that YOU do the talking. If there are too many voices, the kids get confused as where to look and it just adds time to the shoot.

Nice point! Thanks!


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Samples of large (10-15) family photos?
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