Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
Thread started 17 Nov 2010 (Wednesday) 22:06
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

Dioptre Correction

 
ShelleyG
Member
81 posts
Joined Aug 2010
Location: Ontario, Canada
     
Nov 17, 2010 22:06 |  #1

Will having this dial in the 'wrong' position cause pictures to be fuzzy or slightly out of focus?

To be honest I turn this dial and find it hard to see a difference. I have taken a lot of pictures and I find that the focus on them just isn't crisp like I want it to be.

I am using the Canon Rebel XS with the kit 18-55mm IS lens.


Canon Rebel XS, Canon 60D
Canon 18-55 IS, 28-90, 55-250 IS
Sigma 18-200 OS

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
e02937
Goldmember
2,714 posts
Joined Dec 2008
     
Nov 17, 2010 22:09 |  #2

Unless I'm seriously missing something, the diopter adjustment is just for what you see as you look through the viewfinder, it's not going to affect the shots that you take. How are you focusing? What focus mode are you using?

Getting tack sharp shots are the product of a lot of things, proper shutter speeds, using IS on your lens, using an appropriate aperture for the desired depth of field, focus mode, quality of lens, etc, etc.


Canon 7d
[15-85 IS] [70-200
f/4L IS] [I'm a PC]
[Full gear list and feedback]

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
shmoogy
Senior Member
505 posts
Joined Dec 2009
Location: Chicago
     
Nov 17, 2010 22:10 |  #3

The dipoter will have no effect on the autofocus mechanism of the camera, but having it set in a 'wrong' position for your eyes will make things look blurry, when in fact, the camera has attained a correct focus on the subject. The final output image is not dependent on how the image looks through the viewfinder with regards to diopter settings.

e: Would you mind posting a picture or two with the images that you feel are unsatisfactory, if EXIF data is intact, we can narrow down a potential problem.

Follow up question: Is this 'fuzzy' picture phenomena recent, or something that has happened after a month/months of acceptable pictures?

ee: And are you using a UV filter?


5D Mark II, 35L, 24 TS-E, 50 1.8
Canon 1000D

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Sdiver2489
Goldmember
2,845 posts
Gallery: 2 photos
Likes: 112
Joined Sep 2009
     
Nov 17, 2010 22:21 |  #4

post examples


Please visit my Flickr (external link) and leave a comment!

Gear:
Canon 5D III, Canon 24-70L F4 IS, Canon 70-300L F4-F5.6 IS, Canon 100mm F2.8L IS Macro, Canon 35mm F2.0 IS, Canon 430EX II-RT, Canon 600EX II-RT

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
ShelleyG
THREAD ­ STARTER
Member
81 posts
Joined Aug 2010
Location: Ontario, Canada
     
Nov 17, 2010 22:26 |  #5

I didn't think it affected the focusing, but I wanted to make sure

I bought the camera in July 2010 and I use it most of the time for motorcycle sports(motocross and flat track racing) and I just cant seem to get a CRISP picture.

This uploader sucks...I have to shrink the pictures to be SO small! But I have attached two.


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.



HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.


Canon Rebel XS, Canon 60D
Canon 18-55 IS, 28-90, 55-250 IS
Sigma 18-200 OS

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Sdiver2489
Goldmember
2,845 posts
Gallery: 2 photos
Likes: 112
Joined Sep 2009
     
Nov 17, 2010 22:39 |  #6

ShelleyG wrote in post #11304339 (external link)
I didn't think it affected the focusing, but I wanted to make sure

I bought the camera in July 2010 and I use it most of the time for motorcycle sports(motocross and flat track racing) and I just cant seem to get a CRISP picture.

This uploader sucks...I have to shrink the pictures to be SO small! But I have attached two.

What focus mode did you use? Why are you using F9?


Please visit my Flickr (external link) and leave a comment!

Gear:
Canon 5D III, Canon 24-70L F4 IS, Canon 70-300L F4-F5.6 IS, Canon 100mm F2.8L IS Macro, Canon 35mm F2.0 IS, Canon 430EX II-RT, Canon 600EX II-RT

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
ShelleyG
THREAD ­ STARTER
Member
81 posts
Joined Aug 2010
Location: Ontario, Canada
     
Nov 17, 2010 22:45 |  #7

Auto focus

what's wrong with f9?? To be honest I dont know what F to use :/


Canon Rebel XS, Canon 60D
Canon 18-55 IS, 28-90, 55-250 IS
Sigma 18-200 OS

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Sdiver2489
Goldmember
2,845 posts
Gallery: 2 photos
Likes: 112
Joined Sep 2009
     
Nov 17, 2010 22:51 |  #8

ShelleyG wrote in post #11304416 (external link)
Auto focus

what's wrong with f9?? To be honest I dont know what F to use :/

The larger the F number the smaller the aperture the less light but the larger the depth of focus. At 18mm you really can leave the lens wide open(F3.5) for this type of shot.

In regards to focus, I am looking for if you are in one shot mode or servo mode. I am also looking to see if you are selecting the autofocus point. If you aren't doing any of these things then check out your manuals explanation of the focusing of the camera. You really should be in AF Servo mode for this shot.


Please visit my Flickr (external link) and leave a comment!

Gear:
Canon 5D III, Canon 24-70L F4 IS, Canon 70-300L F4-F5.6 IS, Canon 100mm F2.8L IS Macro, Canon 35mm F2.0 IS, Canon 430EX II-RT, Canon 600EX II-RT

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
ShelleyG
THREAD ­ STARTER
Member
81 posts
Joined Aug 2010
Location: Ontario, Canada
     
Nov 17, 2010 22:56 |  #9

I know how aperature works, kind of. I generally use ~16 for bright days and ~9-11 on overcast days. I use the lower setting for darker pictures. I use the larger f so that more of the picture is in focus (larger depth of field)

I am using servo. So that it continually is changing the focus as the bike moves.


Canon Rebel XS, Canon 60D
Canon 18-55 IS, 28-90, 55-250 IS
Sigma 18-200 OS

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Sdiver2489
Goldmember
2,845 posts
Gallery: 2 photos
Likes: 112
Joined Sep 2009
     
Nov 17, 2010 23:14 |  #10

ShelleyG wrote in post #11304464 (external link)
I know how aperature works, kind of. I generally use ~16 for bright days and ~9-11 on overcast days. I use the lower setting for darker pictures. I use the larger f so that more of the picture is in focus (larger depth of field)

I am using servo. So that it continually is changing the focus as the bike moves.

F16 and 9-11 are both overkill and are causing your shutter speeds to be too slow. Lower this setting for action shots. Like I said, use F3.5 for this type of shot.

You still haven't told me what auto focus point you are selecting.


Please visit my Flickr (external link) and leave a comment!

Gear:
Canon 5D III, Canon 24-70L F4 IS, Canon 70-300L F4-F5.6 IS, Canon 100mm F2.8L IS Macro, Canon 35mm F2.0 IS, Canon 430EX II-RT, Canon 600EX II-RT

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
xarqi
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
10,435 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Oct 2005
Location: Aotearoa/New Zealand
     
Nov 17, 2010 23:18 |  #11

I think you've "fallen between two stools" as it were.
The shutter speeds chosen by the camera (given your selection of ISO and aperture) are neither fast enough to arrest subject or camera motion, nor slow enough to give an interesting motion blur while panning.

Try using Tv in shots like this. Pick a fast shutter speed to freeze all motion, or choose a slow speed and pan to give a sense of motion by blurring the background more than the subject.

If you find that your lens can't give you a wide enough aperture for the speed you want, bump up your ISO.

Any problems with shots of static subjects?




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
ReubenH
Senior Member
Avatar
416 posts
Likes: 4
Joined Sep 2010
Location: Queenstown, New Zealand
     
Nov 18, 2010 01:28 |  #12

ShelleyG wrote in post #11304464 (external link)
I generally use ~16 for bright days and ~9-11 on overcast days. I use the lower setting for darker pictures. I use the larger f so that more of the picture is in focus (larger depth of field)


Sdiver2489 wrote in post #11304530 (external link)
F16 and 9-11 are both overkill and are causing your shutter speeds to be too slow. Lower this setting for action shots. Like I said, use F3.5 for this type of shot.


Yup, and larger depth of field is great for landscape stills, but in action shots, there is one thing that's important, and should be the centre of attention; your subject. Using the low F-stop means you will have the rider in focus, and the fore and background blurred, this is desirable! You want them to pop out of the frame! Give it a shot, i think you'll find your pics improve dramatically. With a big F-stop, the trees in the background will overpower the rider, he'll disappear into the background noise.

THAT SAID, a slow exposure can be desirable, BUT, in order to blur the back ground, instead of trying to get it in focus like you were. You need to be tracking the subject perfectly yo pull this off nicely, and not blur the subject. Have a look at this shot, quoted from the 450D thread.

Instead of choosing a high Fstop to get the background in focus, he's chosen the shutter speed, and set the aperture accordingly for exposure, in order to blur the background with motion blur.

izthistaken wrote in post #11240356 (external link)
Doesn't even matter the lens. Here is my least sharpest lens. 70-300 IS USM

Camera Canon EOS Digital Rebel XSi
Exposure 0.04 sec (1/25)
Aperture f/10.0
Focal Length 135 mm
ISO Speed 100

QUOTED IMAGE
IMAGE LINK: http://www.flickr.com …/30705352@N04/5​154152395/  (external link)
Mid Ohio Pan 1/25th shutter (external link) by izthistaken (external link), on Flickr


"Imagination will often carry us to worlds that never were. But without it we go nowhere." - Carl Sagan.
450D, 18-55 IS, 55-250 IS.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
DetlevCM
Goldmember
Avatar
3,431 posts
Gallery: 2 photos
Likes: 20
Joined Apr 2010
Location: Europe
     
Nov 18, 2010 04:25 |  #13

ShelleyG wrote in post #11304228 (external link)
Will having this dial in the 'wrong' position cause pictures to be fuzzy or slightly out of focus?

To be honest I turn this dial and find it hard to see a difference. I have taken a lot of pictures and I find that the focus on them just isn't crisp like I want it to be.

I am using the Canon Rebel XS with the kit 18-55mm IS lens.

Not the final picture, but what you see.
Defocus the lens so you just see a reasonably smoothly coloured area in through the viewfinder, then focus on the "focussing points", adjust the dioptre correction so that the AF markings that you see in the viewfinder are sharp.

You shouldn't see them the same way from -1 to +3, if you do my guess is something is broken in that. It will not affect images you take though.
Oh, and you possibly won't be able to nail "the" dioptre setting because your eyes will correct smaller differences.


5D MK II AF Satisfaction Poll | Reduced Kit List
A Basic Guide to Photographyexternal link | Websiteexternal link
Flickrexternal link | Artflakesexternal link | Blurbexternal link

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Lowner
"I'm the original idiot"
Avatar
12,924 posts
Likes: 14
Joined Jul 2007
Location: Salisbury, UK.
     
Nov 18, 2010 09:35 |  #14

I don't think the aperture is the big problem here. I simply cannot see anything sharp in either image.

So, it's either motion blur (possibly caused by the cameraman moving? and a faster shutter speed is required, or its post processing problems. Which begs the question, what sharpening do you do to the images in post?


Richard

http://rcb4344.zenfoli​o.com (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
NeutronBoy
Goldmember
2,049 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Jul 2007
Location: LI, NY
     
Nov 18, 2010 11:28 |  #15

You may also want to try using just the center focusing point only. Read up in your manual on how you can set the camera to use only that point. I use the center focusing point more than 99% of the time. That way, you are telling the camera what the subject of interest is.


5D Mark II, 40D, 350d
Canon 70-200 f2.8 IS II L | Canon 100-400 IS L [COLOR=black]| Canon 24-70 L | Canon 100mm Macro f2.8 | Canon 50 f1.4| Canon 10-22 | Canon MP-E 65 | Rokinon 14mm f2.8 | Sigma 17 - 70 macro
MT-24 & 430 flashes | other junk

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

6,594 views & 0 likes for this thread
Dioptre Correction
FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is pixelwolf
760 guests, 265 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 15144, that happened on Nov 22, 2018

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.