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Thread started 08 Dec 2010 (Wednesday) 13:20
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Whats the difference between RAW and Jpeg?

 
richy2010
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Dec 08, 2010 13:20 |  #1

Im new to photography and all i know is that i need the canon program to view RAW pictures.


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Wilt
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Dec 08, 2010 13:27 |  #2

  • The sensor has a matrix of pixels, each sensititive to Red or Green or Blue. Each pixel has a numeric value corresponding to the magnitude of that color...written to SD/CF as a RAW file.
    Sets of four sensor pixels have to be interpreted to be converted into one photo pixel by RAW conversion software. So that software has to understand how to interpret each camera model's encoding of that data, since each one is different for pixel count and how that sensor responds...RAW conversion.

  • After interpreting the sensor information within the camera by the in-camera processor, which converts the four sensor pixels to one photo pixel, the photo pixels are written to SD/CF...JPG file.

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ChasP505
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Dec 08, 2010 13:31 |  #3

richy2010 wrote in post #11417423 (external link)
Im new to photography and all i know is that i need the canon program to view RAW pictures.

You can install Digital Photo Professional (DPP) from the disk that came with your camera. After installing, go to the Canon website and check for any software updates, including firmware for your camera.

http://www.usa.canon.c​om …/eos_rebel_xs_1​8_55is_kit (external link)

Let us know if/when you need more help.


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CyberDyneSystems
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Dec 08, 2010 13:50 |  #4

In nutshell;

RAW: is the raw image information as recorded by the camera (explained more fully in Wilt's post)
Jpeg: is an image file made from that data.

The choice of what to shoot is decided based on your wants and needs and understanding of the compromises involved in the choice you make.

Both file types have their distinct advantages, but the final decision is based on your wants and needs.

Bare in mind that every shot on your memory card starts life as RAW data in your camera.
The Jpeg is simply a result of allowing the camera to take that info and create an image file that can be read by anyone on any computer (one of Jpeg's few advantages, but a strong one to some)

The downside is that a jpeg can not contain all the image information your camera records, information that is available at the RAW level has to be reduced, and compressed to fit into that jpeg file.
First, large amounts of color information are immediately thrown out (most modern DLSRs record 14 bits per channel of color information, older ones 12. Jpeg can only store 8 bits of color info per channel)
Then the compression algorithms go to work, reducing image information further, and creating none image based artifacts from the compression process.

The differences in the resulting file types can be broken down in two categories to simplify.

1. Simple brute force Image quality.

RAW wins. It can not be argued. (some may argue to what degree RAW's superior image quality is visible, but this is a non argument, as obviously it is totally subjective. Different people with different needs has no bearing on the final fact that in every case the RAW files is superior in image quality )

2. Flexibility and workability.

Here the discussion is a valuable debate. Jpeg has smaller more portable Image size, and more "cooked" images due to allowing the camera to make processing decisions. It has universal viewing properties, and is the more useful file for those printing using an outside source. One can use a jpeg straight out of he camera if they are willing to make that compromise. RAW allows far more latitude to the shooter in post process, more room for recovery, and more flexibility in color, white balance etc. It can make the jpeg file for external use, as well as many other superior and equally universal file types like Tiff. It allows the user to control all aspects of the final image, leaving no decisions to the camera.

Most people get hung up on the latter, and seem forget that it's not the only reason to chose RAW. We see accusations of using it as a crutch. etc..

These thoughts do not take into account the simple concept that many simply want the best available to them.


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tzalman
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Dec 08, 2010 13:57 |  #5

http://www.adobe.com …ing_digitalrawc​apture.pdf (external link)


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richy2010
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Dec 08, 2010 15:02 as a reply to  @ tzalman's post |  #6

which shoould i choose RAW+ (|L or RAW ? thats the (| is the quarter circle that appears on my choices for quality


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LiberationFrequency
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Dec 08, 2010 15:11 |  #7

Select the option that is just RAW. In my opinion, there is no reason to shoot RAW + Jpeg because Im gonna process the raws into JPEG anyway.




  
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x_tan
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Dec 08, 2010 15:11 as a reply to  @ richy2010's post |  #8

Also:
JPEG = Smaller files and faster file saving by the camera.
RAW = Larger files and slower file saving by the camera.

Suggest to use RAW format:
Taking fewer photos = more 'keeper', and
RAW file is lots more 'flexible' to be edited than JPEG.

My search is over: No more JPEG


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tonylong
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Dec 08, 2010 16:29 |  #9

To briefly add some thoughts: the camera has settings for some things -- White Balance, which has some "calculated values" for color rendering, as well as Contrast, Saturation, Sharpening and Noise Reduction, and then some other things that cameras can have like Highlight Tone Priority or other enhancements -- these things are all rendered into an image when a jpeg is created. But a Raw image does not render these things -- they are stored in the file Metadata instead. What this means is that when you open a Raw image in a Raw processor you have total freedom to change things around, But with jpegs you have less freedom -- color balancing is restricted, and things like shadows and highlights have had their limits "fixed" with jpegs whereas there is more latitude with Raw files to adjust those things.

As others have said, for many uses shooting Raw+jpeg can just take up un-needed space. but, there are people who get use out of it if they need to quickly shoot of a jpeg to, say, an editor or client. For me, my experiments with Raw+jpeg just ended up with a bunch of un-needed jpeg copies which I ended up discarding.

For those starting out, the Canon Raw processing software Digital Photo Professional (DPP) is really top notch. It has nice tools, and a real plus is the fact that is uses the in-camera settings, notably the White Balance and Picture Style settings, to render a Raw preview that is "like a jpeg" and that you can either use as a "starting point" for further enhancing or you can just accept and use it to do a quick conversion to a jpeg for "instant gratification". I do both!

If you want a bit more lengthy discussion of some of this with a test you might enjoy, check out my little essay:

https://photography-on-the.net …p=11397102&post​count=2806

And, check out our Raw Conversion thread for some great examples of what you can do with Raw files and Raw processing software (some even using jpegs):

https://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthre​ad.php?t=684360


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Dec 08, 2010 16:57 |  #10

Wilt wrote in post #11417468 (external link)
  • The sensor has a matrix of pixels, each sensititive to Red or Green or Blue. Each pixel has a numeric value corresponding to the magnitude of that color...written to SD/CF as a RAW file.
    Sets of four sensor pixels have to be interpreted to be converted into one photo pixel by RAW conversion software. So that software has to understand how to interpret each camera model's encoding of that data, since each one is different for pixel count and how that sensor responds...RAW conversion.

  • After interpreting the sensor information within the camera by the in-camera processor, which converts the four sensor pixels to one photo pixel, the photo pixels are written to SD/CF...JPG file.

What he said + JPG is a lossy compression format that will degrade in quality each time you save it. RAW format does not degrade when you save your files.


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SE ­ Smith ­ Jr
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Dec 08, 2010 17:07 |  #11

RAW = Big because everything is inside.
JPG = Not so big because not everything is inside.

Use RAW. ;)


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BestVisuals
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Dec 08, 2010 17:11 as a reply to  @ Krzysztof's post |  #12

The difference is US vs. Iran, Catholic vs. Protestant, Judge Judy vs. litigants.

It's a religious war, very few topic evoke such anger, division and mis-information as this one does.

I'm sure many will give good technical responses to your question. Be wary, however, of the ones that say either: 1) you're not a pro if you don't shoot RAW, and 2) if you shoot RAW, you're automatically a pro.

I shot events (weddings, political meetings, city hall events, etc.) for years and always shot JPEG for those. The disadvantages of RAW - huge file size, transfer speed - simply did not outweigh the benefits for high-volume shooting. For a portrait or commercial work, I'd shoot RAW, no reason not to.

Shoot the format that fits the situation. For events, I shoot JPEG. For everything else, shoot RAW.


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Peano
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Dec 08, 2010 17:29 |  #13

richy2010 wrote in post #11417423 (external link)
Im new to photography and all i know is that i need the canon program to view RAW pictures.

That's easy (external link).


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tonylong
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Dec 08, 2010 18:37 |  #14

BestVisuals wrote in post #11418770 (external link)
The difference is US vs. Iran, Catholic vs. Protestant, Judge Judy vs. litigants.

It's a religious war, very few topic evoke such anger, division and mis-information as this one does.

I'm sure many will give good technical responses to your question. Be wary, however, of the ones that say either: 1) you're not a pro if you don't shoot RAW, and 2) if you shoot RAW, you're automatically a pro.

I shot events (weddings, political meetings, city hall events, etc.) for years and always shot JPEG for those. The disadvantages of RAW - huge file size, transfer speed - simply did not outweigh the benefits for high-volume shooting. For a portrait or commercial work, I'd shoot RAW, no reason not to.

Shoot the format that fits the situation. For events, I shoot JPEG. For everything else, shoot RAW.

Heh! So, your answer to the OP's question is...:)?


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CyberDyneSystems
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Dec 08, 2010 21:10 |  #15

:lol:

Note, that was the first reference to the word or concept "pro" in the whole thread...


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Whats the difference between RAW and Jpeg?
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