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FORUMS General Gear Talk Flash and Studio Lighting 
Thread started 01 Jul 2009 (Wednesday) 22:53
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Is 1/16 power good enough for manual flash on the low end?

 
dengar
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Jul 01, 2009 22:53 |  #1

I have an Opteka EF-600 that I want to move off-camera with the CTR-301. I like the flash so I was considering picking up a couple more in the future. The lowest it goes is 1/16 in manual mode. Is that good enough when I start experimenting with 2 and 3 light setups? I will mostly be taking pictures of the family against a white or black backdrop, maybe some outdoor stuff as well.




  
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tim
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Jul 01, 2009 23:07 |  #2

I don't see a problem, you can always just change your aperture to match. If you plan to use diffusers I doubt you'll use 1/16th much except perhaps as a hair light, though for that it might be a little bright.

Outside you'll want all the power you can get.


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MSIGuy
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Jul 01, 2009 23:10 |  #3

You can always add ND filter gels if you need to.


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george ­ m ­ w
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Jul 02, 2009 00:53 |  #4

You can always add ND filter gels if you need to

....or move it farther away or closer, depending on what you need.


regards, george w

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apersson850
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Jul 02, 2009 04:16 as a reply to  @ george m w's post |  #5

I don't know the rating of that flash at full power, but when using it off camera, you can usually pretty easily move it further away from the subject.
If I had to use such a flash on camera, then 1/16 may be a bit too strong.

I have an old flash, which has guide number 45 @ 35 mm field of view, and only has manual full power. That's difficult to use on manual at closer ranges.


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george ­ m ­ w
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Jul 02, 2009 08:25 |  #6

....and as a followup to my above post about moving it farther or closer, you can always fab some homemade barn doors if you need to control the spread as you move it closer or further from your subject. It's really all about taking your time to set up...and experimenting. If you are trying to get repeatable results, then make sketches and take notes as you try different things.


regards, george w

"It's also obvious that people determined to solve user error with more expensive equipment will graduate to expensive user error."
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dengar
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Jul 02, 2009 08:55 |  #7

apersson850 wrote in post #8210960 (external link)
I don't know the rating of that flash at full power, but when using it off camera, you can usually pretty easily move it further away from the subject.
If I had to use such a flash on camera, then 1/16 may be a bit too strong.

I have an old flash, which has guide number 45 @ 35 mm field of view, and only has manual full power. That's difficult to use on manual at closer ranges.


According to Opteka's website the guide number 148' (45 m) at 85mm. I have no idea how that compares to the Canon flashes. So if I have to move the flash back, I would then need some kind of barn doors if I want to control the spill of light, correct?




  
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klynam
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Jan 02, 2011 19:42 |  #8

Here's a pretty darn inexpensive way to control "spill"...

http://www.saxonpc.com …ells-for-photography.html (external link)


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outback
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Jan 02, 2011 21:48 |  #9

klynam wrote in post #11560473 (external link)
Here's a pretty darn inexpensive way to control "spill"...

http://www.saxonpc.com …ells-for-photography.html (external link)

I like the "stacking" ability. And finally something photography related that is likely worth what you'll pay for it.


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Wilt
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Jan 03, 2011 00:22 |  #10

According to one web site that sells this flash, it has GN148 (feet) at 85mm AOV, but nothing stated about GN with a 'normal' lens (50mm on FF). Let's guess it has GN120 at 'normal' lens coverage.

So putting power back to 1/16 means GN30, and if you put it 6' from the subject, that requires f/5 (f/4 + 0.67EV) or at 3' f/10 (f/8 +0.67EV)


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edge100
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Jan 04, 2011 13:45 |  #11

Neutral density gels are your best friend.


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Is 1/16 power good enough for manual flash on the low end?
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