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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Critique Corner 
Thread started 07 Jan 2011 (Friday) 14:07
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Overtrim
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Jan 07, 2011 14:07 |  #1

I am a wood turner that is trying to imporve my photographs of my work. Both images were taken with a 7D, 1024L lens inside a cube with a window to the left. Both images were taken raw and have been PP. The color of both images are realistic (at least on my monitor). Comments and critique are welcomed! TIA, roger

The first image is that of a Red Gum platter 11.5 inches diameter.
iso 3200, shutter 0.4 sec. at 32mm

IMAGE: http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5210/5329381783_bdc3a11ff3_b.jpg

The second is a curly Koa bowl (8 inches diameter).
iso 1250, shutter 1/50 at 32mm
IMAGE: http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5046/5333578186_0692a37ef2_b.jpg



  
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Martin ­ Dixon
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Jan 07, 2011 15:40 |  #2

I'm no expert but both look amazing.
The second looks artificially rich (red) and contrasty - though I may be used to duller woods.
The highlight at the bottom is a bit niggly + bottom looks a little oof.


flickr (external link) Editing OK (external link)

  
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dino211
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Jan 07, 2011 15:47 |  #3

Did you use a tripod? What f-stop? The ISO could be lower. The plate holder looks out of focus and the background is wrinkled. Have you tried shooting your products in a table setting (for example) to better show a sense of scale? The straight on shot doesn't show the curves and depth of the platter.
Include the exif.
Beautiful wood grain!


Dean
...............
Canon 7Dii, 5Dii, 100-400L, 70-200L f4is, 100 macro, 300L f4is, 24-105L f4i

  
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Overtrim
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Jan 07, 2011 17:36 |  #4

dino211 wrote in post #11594018 (external link)
Did you use a tripod? What f-stop? The ISO could be lower. The plate holder looks out of focus and the background is wrinkled. Have you tried shooting your products in a table setting (for example) to better show a sense of scale? The straight on shot doesn't show the curves and depth of the platter.
Include the exif.
Beautiful wood grain!

Yes on the tripod.
f-stop was f4
I seldom use images beyond what is made in the cube. This is true for most turners.

You are right on about the straight on shot. Platterws are the worst. I usually shoot one head-on, one at an angle, one profile and one bottom view. These still need some work on them to remove the red cast. I do not know how to include the exif data.

Profile:

IMAGE: http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5002/5333866749_0b4714f71d_b.jpg

Bottom:
IMAGE: http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5290/5334483688_bd6f723d5e_b.jpg



  
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Wiinberg
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Jan 07, 2011 18:17 |  #5

If your on a tripod, why the high iso? There is WAY to much noise on all pictures.




  
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Overtrim
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Jan 07, 2011 20:38 |  #6

I don't know. Everything in the past has been in auto mode. I am trying now to learn to do it the right way.




  
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dino211
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Jan 08, 2011 12:18 as a reply to  @ Overtrim's post |  #7

To include exif: open the photo in DPP, click on file, click on convert and save, select image quality and JPG with exif. You need to shoot with more dof - f4 is too shallow


Dean
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Canon 7Dii, 5Dii, 100-400L, 70-200L f4is, 100 macro, 300L f4is, 24-105L f4i

  
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elogical
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Jan 08, 2011 12:53 |  #8

If you're on a tripod and the subject isn't moving, there's no reason to go above ISO 100. I assume you're using either an SLR or camera with manual modes? Just try AV mode, set your iso to 100, set your aperture to whatever is desired (what you used before should be fine) and use that as a starting point. You may have to adjust further but that will get you in the ballpark. Your high ISO is the reason for all the noise and grain in the pictures. Honestly though, you have less noise than I'd expect for that high of an ISO.

Beautiful work by the way, those are awesome!


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Overtrim
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Jan 08, 2011 18:12 |  #9

Here is another try.

Canon 7D, EFS 18-55mm, AV mode f11, f-stop f11, iso 100, shutter speed 0.5, focal length 47mm

IMAGE: http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5204/5337536386_49b76584e8_b.jpg

Canon 7D, 50mm, AV mode f4, f-stop f4, iso 100, shotter speed 1/20 sec., focal length 50mm
IMAGE: http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5207/5336923269_3ef4db598c_b.jpg



  
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elogical
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Jan 08, 2011 19:21 |  #10

Looking good!
If you really want to get into this and aim for perfection, I'd suggest looking at the book Light: Science and Magic (http://www.amazon.com …TF8&qid=1294535​823&sr=8-1 (external link)). Funny enough, one of the first examples they shoot is a detailed gloss wood box. To get much of an improvement beyond what you have now though, I think you'd be looking at more advanced set-ups with lights, light stands, polarizers, reflectors, diffusers, etc to be able to modify specific to each shoot.

Out of curiosity, what is the current lighting set up you're using?


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Overtrim
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Jan 08, 2011 19:41 |  #11

elogical wrote in post #11600994 (external link)
Looking good!
If you really want to get into this and aim for perfection, I'd suggest looking at the book Light: Science and Magic (http://www.amazon.com …TF8&qid=1294535​823&sr=8-1 (external link)). Funny enough, one of the first examples they shoot is a detailed gloss wood box. To get much of an improvement beyond what you have now though, I think you'd be looking at more advanced set-ups with lights, light stands, polarizers, reflectors, diffusers, etc to be able to modify specific to each shoot.

Out of curiosity, what is the current lighting set up you're using?

First thanks for the info and compliment.
I have the 30 inch cube. I have a pair of 150 watts CFLs daylight white one on either side. I also have another 150 watt CFL that I shine through the top or sometime backlight the object. The lights in my gallery are CFLs that I sometimes turn on. All CFLs are daylight whites.

The problem I have with lighting is that it creates hotspots on highly gloss products. I have a pair of Halogen work lights on a stand that I am thinking about building some diffusers and use them.




  
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