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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Critique Corner 
Thread started 02 Feb 2011 (Wednesday) 00:05
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why is this sky charcoal black?

 
whoisvaibhav
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Feb 02, 2011 08:17 |  #16

BTW, if in your post processing, improving the exposure is burning out the snow part, you can also simulate a graduated ND filter (as mentioned by HeaTransfer). In Lightroom, it's called Graduated Filter. This way you will only expose the sky part, and not the snow part.

And yes the problem is with exposure.


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Feb 02, 2011 08:30 as a reply to  @ whoisvaibhav's post |  #17

To set up for this kind of shot, meter to the sky and lock the exposure. Then compose and shoot. If you lose the lock on the exposure (because of a timeout or whatever), take the extra moment or two and meter to the sky. Note the settings. Then go to manual with the settings you got from metering to the sky. Set ISO, shutter, and aperture. Focus and shoot.


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argyle
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Feb 02, 2011 09:05 as a reply to  @ mathogre's post |  #18

Rule of Thumb: When shooting snow, you need to increase the exposure compensation by about 1-1/2 to 2 stops to compensate for the camera's metering.


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Peano
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Feb 02, 2011 09:25 as a reply to  @ post 11762024 |  #19

Very puzzling. Maybe you could upload the raw file to www.yousendit.com (external link) and post the link here. I'd be curious to see it in Camera Raw.

Of course, you can always make a mask and use hue/sat to fix the sky.

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Feb 02, 2011 09:57 |  #20

argyle wrote in post #11762238 (external link)
Rule of Thumb: When shooting snow, you need to increase the exposure compensation by about 1-1/2 to 2 stops to compensate for the camera's metering.

I see sunlight & a clear blue sky without clouds, so the exposure wouldn't be changing & it's a perfect situation for this: Need an exposure crutch?
Why?
Post #47

And for touching up the sky for a better blue, Adjustment Layers are one answer. Post #9: Airport runway shoot

Masks & Blend Modes are another: For those needing help making selections in Photoshop

Layer Mask Tricks (external link)


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Benji
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Feb 02, 2011 10:19 |  #21

Simple. BDE, Basic Daylight Exposure. ANY TIME the scene is lit by THE FULL SUN (like your example above) the correct exposure will ALWAYS be f/16, shutter speed equals ISO (or any equivalent.) For example you have the camera set at ISO 100, the correct exposure will be f/16 and the SS @ 1/100. This will never fail you provided you have full sun (no clouds.) This is just as true in January when the sun is not very hot or August when it is!

Ben




  
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mpix345
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Feb 02, 2011 12:03 |  #22

Benji wrote in post #11762701 (external link)
Simple. BDE, Basic Daylight Exposure. ANY TIME the scene is lit by THE FULL SUN (like your example above) the correct exposure will ALWAYS be f/16, shutter speed equals ISO (or any equivalent.) For example you have the camera set at ISO 100, the correct exposure will be f/16 and the SS @ 1/100. This will never fail you provided you have full sun (no clouds.) This is just as true in January when the sun is not very hot or August when it is!

Ben

And it doesn't matter if you are shooting a black dog in a green grass field or tubers on hills of snow? (not challenging your statement; just honestly clueless)


  
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JOSX2
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Feb 02, 2011 13:15 |  #23

Benji wrote in post #11762701 (external link)
Simple. BDE, Basic Daylight Exposure. ANY TIME the scene is lit by THE FULL SUN (like your example above) the correct exposure will ALWAYS be f/16, shutter speed equals ISO (or any equivalent.) For example you have the camera set at ISO 100, the correct exposure will be f/16 and the SS @ 1/100. This will never fail you provided you have full sun (no clouds.) This is just as true in January when the sun is not very hot or August when it is!

Ben

aka....The Sunny 16 rule (external link) :cool:


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JOSX2
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Feb 02, 2011 13:17 |  #24

mpix345 wrote in post #11763403 (external link)
And it doesn't matter if you are shooting a black dog in a green grass field or tubers on hills of snow? (not challenging your statement; just honestly clueless)

correct. It's a 'rule of thumb' to guide ya to get the correct exposure on a bright sunny day. You may have to adjust by 1 or 2 stops depending on what you're shooting though (no photog rule is set in stone). You're examples of black dog or snowy hill, you'll prolly have to slightly adjust the exposure a stop or so.


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Createsean
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Feb 02, 2011 15:24 |  #25

Hi all,

really appreciate all the help here. I've uploaded the original raw file to my dropbox here (can't find the public share link). Will be away from the internet until Sunday (going to inlaws in the country and there's no internet available), but when I get back will check back in with this thread.


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Benji
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Feb 02, 2011 18:55 |  #26

josullivan79 wrote in post #11763902 (external link)
correct. It's a 'rule of thumb' to guide ya to get the correct exposure on a bright sunny day. You may have to adjust by 1 or 2 stops depending on what you're shooting though (no photog rule is set in stone). You're examples of black dog or snowy hill, you'll prolly have to slightly adjust the exposure a stop or so.

No its not a rule of thumb it is 100% accurate 100% of the time (provided it is between about 10 AM and 5 PM, I.E. "full sun.") It is just as true in January as it is in July. North pole or south pole. Europe or north America it makes no difference because the full sun is the full sun is the full sun. It always puts out the exact same amount of light so you will never need to "adjust the exposure a stop or two" for black dogs or white snow.

Benji




  
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Feb 02, 2011 19:05 |  #27

In Camera Raw, set the WB to daylight. Move the highlight slider to the right. Go to the tab with saturation, increase your blue, see if you get closer.

Do not miss the moderator's post above; he's always spot-on.


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JOSX2
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Feb 02, 2011 20:09 |  #28

Benji wrote in post #11765896 (external link)
No its not a rule of thumb it is 100% accurate 100% of the time (provided it is between about 10 AM and 5 PM, I.E. "full sun.") It is just as true in January as it is in July. North pole or south pole. Europe or north America it makes no difference because the full sun is the full sun is the full sun. It always puts out the exact same amount of light so you will never need to "adjust the exposure a stop or two" for black dogs or white snow.

Benji


aight...my bad then. Someone told me that sunny 16 was a perfect way to start out w/ an exposure, & adjust if necessary. I haven't had a chance to put it to action, so I was just going by what I was told. But if it's a 100%-all-the-time-for-correct exposure (in daylight), then that's what it is


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Qbx
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Feb 03, 2011 03:49 |  #29

Peano wrote in post #11762347 (external link)
Very puzzling. Maybe you could upload the raw file to www.yousendit.com (external link) and post the link here. I'd be curious to see it in Camera Raw.

Of course, you can always make a mask and use hue/sat to fix the sky.

QUOTED IMAGE

Peano, that's a great edit. How did you mask the sky and get the mask to weave between the tree branches so well?


-- Image Editing OK --

  
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Peano
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Feb 03, 2011 09:08 |  #30

Qbx wrote in post #11768053 (external link)
Peano, that's a great edit. How did you mask the sky and get the mask to weave between the tree branches so well?

Thank you. I used Calculations on (if I remember correctly) the blue channel.


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why is this sky charcoal black?
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