Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Sports Talk 
Thread started 15 Feb 2011 (Tuesday) 07:50
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

Tips for my first sports shoot - College Basketball

 
bank5
Member
101 posts
Joined Jan 2009
     
Feb 15, 2011 07:50 |  #1

I'm going to a JV college basketball game tonight. Does anyone have any tips on things like settings, where to sit, what to try, etc?

Based on what I've been reading on here I'm going to start with these settings:

Lens: 85mm 1.8
Aperture: Wide Open (should I be concerned about the DoF being too shallow?)
Sutter Speed: 1/800 (will shoot in manual so I can slow it down for shots when play is stopped)

Auto ISO, Auto WB, AI Servo, AF Auto




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
dankopp
Member
192 posts
Joined Oct 2009
     
Feb 15, 2011 09:04 |  #2

You generally have it right. I don't have the 85mm, I use a 2.8. From what I read on here, many people shoot the 85mm at f/2 though.

1/800 is great, although 1/620 will work in a pinch. The ball is sometimes a little blurry at 1/620though.

If you can figure out the ISO, that is better than Auto ISO (although I use that function in gyms where the light is uneven).

I tend to overexpose slightly, as that helps with faces when they are close to you and backlit and helps with the noise.

Baseline is best. I would think with an 85mm you want to be closer to the corner than the basket.

You won't get good shots at the other end. I wouldn't even bother.

Good luck!




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Craign
Goldmember
Avatar
1,196 posts
Gallery: 17 photos
Likes: 77
Joined Mar 2010
Location: Kentucky
     
Feb 15, 2011 09:31 |  #3

Arrive early enough to experiment with a variety of settings. Warm-ups usually begin one half hour before tip-off.

Sit behind the end line with the basket/lane to your left. Most players are right handed and you will be facing them on many lay-ups. Do not sit directly behind the basket - you run the risk of getting bowled over and a referee will often be in your way.

Lighting can be anything. Try using custom WB or pick one of the presets. Any kind of control is usually better than trusting the camera with Auto WB.

Set ISO to the highest level that is acceptable for you.

Experiment during warm-ups with different AV and TV settings keeping SS at least 1/500, 1/1000+ is better and possible with decent lighting and the 85mm f/1.8 lens.

My biggest problem is shooting the "big picture" and not focusing on a player. This can/will result in the camera focusing between players and on the background. The foreground and the important part, the players, is then out of focus.

I include the following to stress the importance of focusing on the main subject.
The DoF with the 85mm lens @ f/1.8 and distance to subject of 20 ft. is a whopping 1' 1.7" at f/4.0 it increases to only 2' 6.5" at 30 ft. and @ f/1.8 DoF is 2' 6.9" This was calculated using: http://www.tawbaware.c​om/maxlyons/calc.htm (external link)


Canon 7D Mark II w/Canon BG-E16 Battery Grip; Canon EOS 50D w/Canon Battery Grip; Canon SL1; Tokina 12mm - 24mm f/4 PRO DX II; Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS; Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS; Canon 70-300mm f/4-5.6L IS; Sigma 85mm f/1.4 EX DG HSM; Canon EF 300mm f/4L IS; Canon EF-S 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS STM; Canon Extender EF 1.4x II; Canon Extender EF 2x II; Canon Speedlite 430EX II Flash
Image Editing Okay

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
snyderman
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
7,083 posts
Likes: 7
Joined Nov 2008
Location: Wadsworth, Ohio
     
Feb 15, 2011 10:12 |  #4

since you didn't say what body you'll use, I'll give you the standard settings using my 7D for indoor basketball. Set shutter to 1/640, your 85mm f/1.8 to f/2 and raise ISO setting until you have proper exposure. Standard HS gyms are around ISO 2500. If the venue is particularly well-lit for you, you may want to sacrifice ISO for 1/800 on the shutter for the quicker college players.

Shoot in manual, don't choose any of the auto settings. Put camera in centerpoint only focus mode. As for WB, if you can't do some sort of custom WB, choose the fluorescent setting which is usually closest to reality in a gym. As someone mentioned, try to meter some shots with the players on the court during shoot-around prior to the game.

If you have court side access, a great place to setup with the 85mm lens is on the sideline and about 5' behind the baseline. From this vantage point, you'll be able to get full bodies in shots around the basket. Also, anything on your side of the court from the 3pt line to the foul line will be good also.

Last tip: Setup your camera for good exposure and enough shutter speed then don't mess with things. Lighting is usually fairly consistent on basketball courts. There are some dark(er) zones, but that's the way it is. Set it, forget it and concentrate on shooting the game action and not messing with your camera setup.

Good luck and be sure to post some shots.

dave


Canon 5D2 > 35L-85L-135L

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
DC ­ Fan
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
5,881 posts
Gallery: 3 photos
Likes: 50
Joined Oct 2005
     
Feb 15, 2011 10:40 as a reply to  @ snyderman's post |  #5

Effective basketball photography goes far beyond settings. You have to be on the lookout for action, drama and intensity, and anticipate those moments so you're pushing the shutter button before it happens.

IMAGE NOT FOUND
IMAGE IS A REDIRECT OR MISSING!
Byte size: ZERO | Content warning: NOT AN IMAGE


IMAGE NOT FOUND
IMAGE IS A REDIRECT OR MISSING!
Byte size: ZERO | Content warning: NOT AN IMAGE


The intensity and drama of a basketball game is displayed best on the faces of the participants, both players and coaches. Nearly all of the best images will have the players coming at you, so you can clearly see the raw emotions. Because you can usually get very close to the action, it's simple to get frame-filling shots, but you need to make sure those images tell the story of how much the game means to the participants. Numbers on a player's back don't tell a story, but faces convey the game's excitement.



  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
bank5
THREAD ­ STARTER
Member
101 posts
Joined Jan 2009
     
Feb 15, 2011 11:28 as a reply to  @ DC Fan's post |  #6

Thanks all for the great replies. Exactly what I was wondering.

To follow up, I'll be shooting with a 60D. I'll have the following lenses - nifty-50, nifty-250, and 85mm 1.8.

The lighting in the arena will be excellent - at least compared to high school gyms.


Some additional questions I have are:

1. Why do some recommend manually setting the ISO? Is this so you can slightly overexpose?

2. Do most people use center point AF? Someone recommended that and it makes sense, incase a ref or another player gets in the way.

3. I'm new to photography so am not too sure about setting the WB. Is it tough to mess up? I'm concerned that if I manually set too many things something will be off. Then again, I'm just going out there for a learning experience and don't plan on keeping the shots.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Mk1Racer
Goldmember
Avatar
1,735 posts
Likes: 9
Joined Mar 2009
Location: Flagtown, NJ
     
Feb 16, 2011 07:05 |  #7

bank5 wrote in post #11847918 (external link)
Thanks all for the great replies. Exactly what I was wondering.

To follow up, I'll be shooting with a 60D. I'll have the following lenses - nifty-50, nifty-250, and 85mm 1.8.

The lighting in the arena will be excellent - at least compared to high school gyms.


Some additional questions I have are:

1. Why do some recommend manually setting the ISO? Is this so you can slightly overexpose?

2. Do most people use center point AF? Someone recommended that and it makes sense, incase a ref or another player gets in the way.

3. I'm new to photography so am not too sure about setting the WB. Is it tough to mess up? I'm concerned that if I manually set too many things something will be off. Then again, I'm just going out there for a learning experience and don't plan on keeping the shots.

1) Yes. Do some research on HAMSTR.

2) Yes. Center-point AF and AI Servo for tracking. Also research back-button focusing.

3) I can't offer anything on WB, but go out there with the intention of getting keepers.


7D, BG-E7, BGE2x2 (both FS), 17-55 f/2.8 IS, 17-85 f/4-5.6 IS (FS), 50 f/1.8, 85 f/1.8, 70-200 f/2.8L IS Mk I, 70-300 f/4-5.6L, 550EX, Kenko Pro300 1.4xTC

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
squires
Member
40 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Sep 2010
     
Feb 16, 2011 09:44 as a reply to  @ Mk1Racer's post |  #8

Shot my first basketball game last night (high school) and all i have to say is: I hate refs :D




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
SkateSoft
Senior Member
383 posts
Joined Jan 2011
     
Feb 16, 2011 21:28 as a reply to  @ squires's post |  #9

I see you have the 250. I shot my first game last Sunday with it and it was better then I expected. I had to shoot on 6400 and noise reduce in light room and I feel that noise wasn't that bad and I expect that the 60d is much better when it comes to noise. Only use the 50 and 85 if you have it, the 250 was just a pain.


Gear- 550d, KONICA Auto S2, Pentak ZX-50, 18-55, 55-250, YN-560
http://www.dylanredfie​ldphotography.com (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
slimenta
Senior Member
Avatar
369 posts
Joined Oct 2009
Location: Charlotte, NC
     
Feb 18, 2011 23:29 as a reply to  @ SkateSoft's post |  #10

Everything manual is best! Your camera is not smart enough to optimize for the player you are shooting so everything manual will work best. A couple of comments.

WB==I use tungsten at it works well where I shoot
Shutter speed--Although 1/640-1/800 work, I like 1/1000. Nothing worse than losing a good shot because you shot to slow
Aperture--wide open
ISO--whatever it takes


www.stevenlimentanipho​tography.com (external link)
http://www.sportsshoot​er.com/members.html?id​=8865 (external link)
1DX x 2, 1D Mark IV X 4, 5D Mark III x 3, 200-400, 4.0, 400 2.8 (II), 300 2.8, 200 2.0, 70-200 2.8 (II),135 2.0, 85, 1.2, 50 1.2, 24 1.4, 17-55 2.8, 24-70 2.8, 16-35 2.8, 28-300 3.5-5.6, 100-400 4.5-5.6, 16-35, 2.8, 8-15, 4.0 fisheye, 1.4 X and 2X TC

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
SkateSoft
Senior Member
383 posts
Joined Jan 2011
     
Feb 19, 2011 07:26 |  #11

slimenta wrote in post #11871674 (external link)
Everything manual is best! Your camera is not smart enough to optimize for the player you are shooting so everything manual will work best. A couple of comments.

WB==I use tungsten at it works well where I shoot
Shutter speed--Although 1/640-1/800 work, I like 1/1000. Nothing worse than losing a good shot because you shot to slow
Aperture--wide open
ISO--whatever it takes

I would dissagree with some of these. First since it is a JV game they might be in a gym with bad lighting or with different lighting around the room. If this happens just use AV


Gear- 550d, KONICA Auto S2, Pentak ZX-50, 18-55, 55-250, YN-560
http://www.dylanredfie​ldphotography.com (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
slimenta
Senior Member
Avatar
369 posts
Joined Oct 2009
Location: Charlotte, NC
     
Feb 19, 2011 14:57 |  #12

SkateSoft wrote in post #11872731 (external link)
I would dissagree with some of these. First since it is a JV game they might be in a gym with bad lighting or with different lighting around the room. If this happens just use AV

Not sure what it being a JV game has to do with it and in fact bad lighting makes the need for manual settings even more important because of the inconsistency of the light.


www.stevenlimentanipho​tography.com (external link)
http://www.sportsshoot​er.com/members.html?id​=8865 (external link)
1DX x 2, 1D Mark IV X 4, 5D Mark III x 3, 200-400, 4.0, 400 2.8 (II), 300 2.8, 200 2.0, 70-200 2.8 (II),135 2.0, 85, 1.2, 50 1.2, 24 1.4, 17-55 2.8, 24-70 2.8, 16-35 2.8, 28-300 3.5-5.6, 100-400 4.5-5.6, 16-35, 2.8, 8-15, 4.0 fisheye, 1.4 X and 2X TC

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
SkateSoft
Senior Member
383 posts
Joined Jan 2011
     
Feb 19, 2011 16:06 |  #13

slimenta wrote in post #11874409 (external link)
Not sure what it being a JV game has to do with it and in fact bad lighting makes the need for manual settings even more important because of the inconsistency of the light.

But if there is inconsistency of lighting then you will have to be constantly be changing settings.


Gear- 550d, KONICA Auto S2, Pentak ZX-50, 18-55, 55-250, YN-560
http://www.dylanredfie​ldphotography.com (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
slimenta
Senior Member
Avatar
369 posts
Joined Oct 2009
Location: Charlotte, NC
     
Feb 19, 2011 17:50 |  #14

SkateSoft wrote in post #11874680 (external link)
But if there is inconsistency of lighting then you will have to be constantly be changing settings.

Of course but the ability of AV or TV to get it right is generally poor compared to what you can do with manual settings. AV and TV give you an average. If the players completely fill your field than it may be OK, but in most cases they do not. An example would be a shot where you have a lot of the crowd in the background and the crowd is relatively dark compared to the player. The player will be overexposed.


www.stevenlimentanipho​tography.com (external link)
http://www.sportsshoot​er.com/members.html?id​=8865 (external link)
1DX x 2, 1D Mark IV X 4, 5D Mark III x 3, 200-400, 4.0, 400 2.8 (II), 300 2.8, 200 2.0, 70-200 2.8 (II),135 2.0, 85, 1.2, 50 1.2, 24 1.4, 17-55 2.8, 24-70 2.8, 16-35 2.8, 28-300 3.5-5.6, 100-400 4.5-5.6, 16-35, 2.8, 8-15, 4.0 fisheye, 1.4 X and 2X TC

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
SkateSoft
Senior Member
383 posts
Joined Jan 2011
     
Feb 19, 2011 18:08 |  #15

slimenta wrote in post #11875211 (external link)
Of course but the ability of AV or TV to get it right is generally poor compared to what you can do with manual settings. AV and TV give you an average. If the players completely fill your field than it may be OK, but in most cases they do not. An example would be a shot where you have a lot of the crowd in the background and the crowd is relatively dark compared to the player. The player will be overexposed.

Then you can use spot metering or the smallest type of metering mode.


Gear- 550d, KONICA Auto S2, Pentak ZX-50, 18-55, 55-250, YN-560
http://www.dylanredfie​ldphotography.com (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

3,137 views & 0 likes for this thread
Tips for my first sports shoot - College Basketball
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Sports Talk 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is travelhuge1
1210 guests, 280 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 15144, that happened on Nov 22, 2018

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.