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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 26 Feb 2011 (Saturday) 02:46
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Purpose of a fast UWA?

 
spineduke
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Feb 26, 2011 02:46 |  #1

So I have the Tokina 11-16/2.8. Suggestions for taking advantage of the 2.8 aperture? I find myself trying to maximize the DoF. For most landscape shots I'm shooting at 8+. With indoor shots I also have a DoF problem, with areas seemingly looking oof, when its just the bokeh kicking in. So I rarely use 2.8 indoors as well..maybe I'm approaching it the wrong way?




  
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KenjiS
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Feb 26, 2011 02:51 |  #2

Perhaps some examples would help?


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spineduke
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Feb 26, 2011 02:59 as a reply to  @ KenjiS's post |  #3

Sadly I'm at work at the moment, so I can't upload anything. I guess the best way to sum up my question is, where would the Tokina have a large discernible advantage over a slower UWA, say the Canon 10-22?




  
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Brennan.M
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Feb 26, 2011 03:00 |  #4

low light is nice to have


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FlyingPhotog
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Feb 26, 2011 03:02 |  #5

You can still isolate details in the foreground shooting wide open with a WA or UWA lens...

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spineduke
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Feb 26, 2011 03:11 |  #6

FlyingPhotog wrote in post #11916739 (external link)
You can still isolate details in the foreground shooting wide open with a WA or UWA lens...
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Good example! The bokeh on the Tokina doesn't look anywhere as good though!




  
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mansalim
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Feb 26, 2011 03:18 |  #7

since tokina is faster, you can select lower iso and/or faster shutter speed, and still has the same exposure.
Lower iso, lower noise, faster speed, reduce chance of blur.
Not to mention tokina is fixed aperture, and a parfocal lens..
i prefer fixed aperture so i can zoom without worrying about exposure variation, and being a parfocal greatly help with my video.


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newton
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Feb 26, 2011 03:18 |  #8

Low light concerts.




  
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MintMark
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Feb 26, 2011 03:22 |  #9

Brennan.M wrote in post #11916734 (external link)
low light is nice to have

That's the answer for me... and low light might be things like night time city views, landscape illuminated by moonlight, star trails.

I just got an 11-16 for astrophotography. The Tokina can be used in conjunction with a clip in light pollution filter and that can't be done with the Canon EF-S design (I even tried removing the back from the Canon!)


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spineduke
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Feb 26, 2011 03:24 |  #10

mansalim wrote in post #11916769 (external link)
since tokina is faster, you can select lower iso and/or faster shutter speed, and still has the same exposure.
Lower iso, lower noise, faster speed, reduce chance of blur.
Not to mention tokina is fixed aperture, and a parfocal lens..
i prefer fixed aperture so i can zoom without worrying about exposure variation, and being a parfocal greatly help with my video.

Ah right, video! Good thinking.

newton wrote:
Low light concerts.

Wouldn't a longer lens be a much better choice? Like a 85/1.8? :)




  
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smythie
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Feb 26, 2011 03:25 |  #11

with the f/2.8 max aperture throughout the focal range, I see one of its advantages being that it allows those bodies with f/2.8 sensitive focus points the luxury of easier focussing.

Or is my assumption (based on limited experience admittedly) incorrect?


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spineduke
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Feb 26, 2011 03:41 |  #12

MintMark wrote in post #11916781 (external link)
That's the answer for me... and low light might be things like night time city views, landscape illuminated by moonlight, star trails.

I just got an 11-16 for astrophotography. The Tokina can be used in conjunction with a clip in light pollution filter and that can't be done with the Canon EF-S design (I even tried removing the back from the Canon!)

So you shoot night time city landscapes at 2.8? The only advantage I can think of is that the exposure time is shorter, so less noise, but you're still better off shooting at 4+ for a sharper picture.

The light pollution filter idea is neat, it'll be nice to explore this one day.

smythie wrote:
Or is my assumption (based on limited experience admittedly) incorrect?

UWAs have a hard time deciding on what to focus on in the first place. Most of the times I just shoot manual.




  
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newton
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Feb 26, 2011 04:09 |  #13

spineduke wrote in post #11916785 (external link)
Wouldn't a longer lens be a much better choice? Like a 85/1.8? :)

Sure, but not every shot is a crop of the singer or performer. Sometimes you wanna get atmosphere, stage, audience or the entire band in one shot.

And most media photobooths for concerts are right in front of the stage, requiring wide lenses.

For example I shot this one a while back. If it was night time, I would have wished for the Tokina over my 10-22.

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Feb 26, 2011 05:58 |  #14

One word - Astrophotography.

When you're doing those wide-field Milky Way shots, or star-trails, then every single photon is precious. The extra stop or so can make a huge difference.


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hollis_f
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Feb 26, 2011 06:05 |  #15

spineduke wrote in post #11916699 (external link)
So I have the Tokina 11-16/2.8. Suggestions for taking advantage of the 2.8 aperture? I find myself trying to maximize the DoF. For most landscape shots I'm shooting at 8+.

Er, does it really make that much difference to the DoF? At 11mm and f/11 your hyperfocal distance is just 81 cm. Whereas at f/2.8 it's 226cm and everything from 184cm to infinity is in focus.

Now I don't think I'd really be that worried about such tiny differences in DoF.


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Purpose of a fast UWA?
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