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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
Thread started 04 Mar 2011 (Friday) 04:23
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450D shutter speed

 
talbot_sunbeam
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Mar 04, 2011 09:47 |  #16

Easy to test. Switch to manual focus and take some pics without worrying about focus. If you are getting the response you expect, then it's your technique that's the problem.

Always focus by half press, and *then* finish the press to activate the shutter - otherwise you press in one go, the camera has to figure out the image, work out the contrasty bits, focus the lens accordingly, confirm the focus, and then take the picture - no wonder there's a delay.



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preveen
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Mar 04, 2011 09:55 |  #17

Turn off as many "auto" things as you can.The only thing I have in auto is the focus. And learn to anticipate.
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Bang ­ Bang ­ Boy
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Mar 04, 2011 11:38 |  #18

Switch to back button focusing. Then you atleast know that when you hit the shutter the picture is taken.


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LeeRatters
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Mar 04, 2011 13:45 |  #19

Bang Bang Boy wrote in post #11955208 (external link)
Switch to back button focusing. Then you atleast know that when you hit the shutter the picture is taken.

i've only recently swapped over to back button but that was what i was going to suggest too!!


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Mar 05, 2011 06:55 |  #20

Keep both eyes open all the time.
Anticipate when you need to take the picture (takes practice)
Get into a rythmn of taking photos throughout the event.
Remember that with an SLR, if you saw the shot in the viewfinder, you missed it.


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Mar 05, 2011 07:01 |  #21

Oh, and don't rely on frames/sec to get the shot you want. Develop your timing so that you get the shot you want first time.


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enrigonz
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Mar 05, 2011 07:07 |  #22

You can't just press the shutter all the way and expect instant response on any camera, they all have to acquire focus first, so you press it half way and press all the way when you want the shot. Set if to continuous shooting if you want to grab 3-4 images at a time (3-4 FPS) and you wont have to release your finger off the shutter button.


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spurs73spurs
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Mar 05, 2011 14:32 |  #23

Thank you all for you replies. It all makes sense a bit now. I will have a go at back button focusing and see how I go.

Geejay, Your comment "Remember that with an SLR, if you saw the shot in the viewfinder, you missed it." is exactly what I am doing. I am expecting to see a photo of whats in my view finder. I will have a go at correcting that, Thankyou.


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preveen
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Mar 06, 2011 11:25 |  #24

I'm not an expert at the back button focus method, but I seriously doubt its usable for fast action photos. Having to press two buttons when capturing a moving target just seems slow. It will never work on something coming towards you or moving away. You'll have to hope the action stays the same distance away from you.




  
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ChewieT
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Mar 06, 2011 11:43 |  #25

Actually a lot of sports shooters prefer the back button focus method.


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musashi
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Mar 06, 2011 12:14 |  #26

preveen wrote in post #11966583 (external link)
I'm not an expert at the back button focus method, but I seriously doubt its usable for fast action photos. Having to press two buttons when capturing a moving target just seems slow. It will never work on something coming towards you or moving away. You'll have to hope the action stays the same distance away from you.

Its very very usable for fast action shots, it can handle same distance or erratic movements, and preferred by many.


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Tim ­ S
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Mar 06, 2011 12:22 |  #27

apersson850 wrote in post #11953652 (external link)
Make sure you have the button at half-press for at least half a second before shooting. Thus at least the camera is as ready as it can be. If you press all the way in one move, it has to do the focusing first, and even in AI Servo AF, that takes some time.

No focus confirmation in AI Focus, the shutter fires when the button is pressed, whether focus was achieved or not. You need to work on your anticipation skills. The biggest delay is from eye to brain to finger!


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preveen
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Mar 07, 2011 08:17 |  #28

musashi wrote in post #11966880 (external link)
Its very very usable for fast action shots, it can handle same distance or erratic movements, and preferred by many.

Thats the thing, same distance. For something like, say a race car coming towards you? Or sitting on the baseline trying to take a basketball player running towards you?




  
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philwillmedia
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Mar 07, 2011 14:33 |  #29

preveen wrote in post #11966583 (external link)
I'm not an expert at the back button focus method, but I seriously doubt its usable for fast action photos...

preveen wrote in post #11972219 (external link)
Thats the thing, same distance. For something like, say a race car coming towards you? Or sitting on the baseline trying to take a basketball player running towards you?

It's obvious you don't have a clue what you're talking about.
Maybe you should refrain from giving advice and opinions on methods you know little or nothing about and have no experience with.


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HmrMike
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Mar 07, 2011 19:59 |  #30

preveen wrote in post #11972219 (external link)
Thats the thing, same distance. For something like, say a race car coming towards you? Or sitting on the baseline trying to take a basketball player running towards you?

So half-pressing the shutter button should be better for stuff coming right at you?:confused:
Happy accidental refocusing to you.

I shoot a little at some scale RC aircraft show every year with the XSI. And when those little tiny planes get far enough to cover only one focus point (not rare on a rebel), passing the half-press focusing torment each time to take a shot is terrible. I mean keeping the point exactly on some part of the plane is nearly impossible (I'm not a robot), also useless (at least some composition is required if they use smoke or have good background). The camera will very often try to focus on the sky.
Just stop AF by releasing the * button, problem solved. I'd rather plan the shot a bit ahead, it's not too hard. Half pressing the shutter button only makes the camera do things that I don't want it to do at the moment, so make it lock the exposure instead.




  
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450D shutter speed
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