Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
Thread started 05 Mar 2011 (Saturday) 22:36
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

How To Clean My Lens?

 
Bill ­ Boehme
Enjoy being spanked
Avatar
7,358 posts
Gallery: 38 photos
Best ofs: 1
Likes: 88
Joined Jan 2007
Location: DFW Metro-mess, Texas
     
Mar 07, 2011 01:06 |  #16

fvsurfer wrote in post #11971037 (external link)
Can I use a duster from those aerosol cans that we use on computers?

I have found that they sometimes leave a residue.


Atmospheric haze in images? Click for Tutorial to Reduce Atmospheric Haze with Photoshop.
Gear List .... Gallery: Woodturner Bill (external link)
Donate to Support POTN Operating Costs

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
fvsurfer
THREAD ­ STARTER
Member
196 posts
Joined Jan 2011
     
Mar 07, 2011 01:21 |  #17

Rai33 wrote in post #11965612 (external link)
Basicaly what SkipD says - I use Eclipse solution and their tissues. I also avoid cleaning as much as possible - I keep the lens cap on when not shooting and use a rocket blower on both the lens and lens cap each time after shooting. Good practice to also keep the lens cap clean and avoid putting it in your pocket full of lint while you shoot etc. Always using a hood while you shoot also helps keep the need to clean to a minimum.

I always put my lens cap in my pocket. I knew right away it was going to collect dust, but where am I supposed to put it!


Canon EOS 60D/Sigma 30mm F1.4 EX DC

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Lone ­ Rider
Goldmember
Avatar
1,349 posts
Joined Jun 2010
Location: Mount Isa, North West Qld
     
Mar 07, 2011 01:38 |  #18

I picked up my new reading glasses today ($1,000) and my optometrist told me this......the glass needs to be wet.

Put a wet tissue on the glass, wipe the lens and use a soft lint cloth to clean it. He swears this is the best way to clean pro quality glass.


Trevor
_______________
Canon 5D3 24-70L 70-300 DO IS 18-55 Sigma 10-20 430EXII BACKUP: 550D

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Rai33
Goldmember
Avatar
1,838 posts
Likes: 16
Joined Jan 2009
Location: Sydney
     
Mar 07, 2011 01:38 |  #19

fvsurfer wrote in post #11971158 (external link)
I always put my lens cap in my pocket. I knew right away it was going to collect dust, but where am I supposed to put it!

I usually chuck it into a clean section of my camera bag.


Portfolio - Fashion/Beauty (external link)
Portfolio - Kids (external link)
Model Mayhem (external link)
Flickr (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Bill ­ Boehme
Enjoy being spanked
Avatar
7,358 posts
Gallery: 38 photos
Best ofs: 1
Likes: 88
Joined Jan 2007
Location: DFW Metro-mess, Texas
     
Mar 07, 2011 02:09 |  #20

Sportidi wrote in post #11971207 (external link)
I picked up my new reading glasses today ($1,000) and my optometrist told me this......the glass needs to be wet.

Put a wet tissue on the glass, wipe the lens and use a soft lint cloth to clean it. He swears this is the best way to clean pro quality glass.

Uh, that would be a lint-free cloth unless things work differently in Oz.

The best type of lint-free cloth are the microfiber cloths designed for cleaning glasses and lenses. There are a number of different kinds of microfiber cloths including those sold in the automobile section of WalMart -- those are good for cleaning your auto, but not the same as lens cleaning cloths. Also, many people do not quite understand that even the best cloth gets dirty and must either be cleaned (not in the clothes washer) or replaced occasionally.


Atmospheric haze in images? Click for Tutorial to Reduce Atmospheric Haze with Photoshop.
Gear List .... Gallery: Woodturner Bill (external link)
Donate to Support POTN Operating Costs

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Lone ­ Rider
Goldmember
Avatar
1,349 posts
Joined Jun 2010
Location: Mount Isa, North West Qld
     
Mar 07, 2011 03:33 |  #21

Bill Boehme wrote in post #11971309 (external link)
Uh, that would be a lint-free cloth unless things work differently in Oz.

The best type of lint-free cloth are the microfiber cloths designed for cleaning glasses and lenses. There are a number of different kinds of microfiber cloths including those sold in the automobile section of WalMart -- those are good for cleaning your auto, but not the same as lens cleaning cloths. Also, many people do not quite understand that even the best cloth gets dirty and must either be cleaned (not in the clothes washer) or replaced occasionally.

....my bad...."lint-free cloth"...:oops:

I was also told the fine grains of dirt/dust in the cloth can make it worse, and to wash it out every couple of weeks or so...


Trevor
_______________
Canon 5D3 24-70L 70-300 DO IS 18-55 Sigma 10-20 430EXII BACKUP: 550D

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
tagnal
Goldmember
1,255 posts
Likes: 62
Joined Aug 2010
Location: Bay Area, CA
     
Mar 07, 2011 18:00 |  #22

If not in the clothes washer, then by hand? Do you use distilled water? I ended up buying a new one at one point, but if I can wash and reuse the old ones, that would be great.


5D3 / M3 / S100 / Σ 35 Art / 50 1.8 / 135 L / 17-40 L / 24-70 L / 70-200 f/4 IS L / m 22 2.0 / 580ex II
Toy List | flickr (external link) | FAA (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
DutchVince
Senior Member
297 posts
Joined Oct 2010
Location: Netherlands
     
Mar 07, 2011 19:27 |  #23

Bill Boehme wrote in post #11964304 (external link)
The microfiber lens cloth is the best thing except for possibly PecPads. Avoid the so called lens tissues like the plague.

Interesting, my experience is the opposite of yours.

I tried microfibre cloth for a short while but I have no use for them.
I now avoid them like the plague: anything that touches my lens gets thrown away immediately because after using a cloth once or twice it will smear finger-grease/oil all over the place. I could never keep the d@mn cloths clean for longer than one cleaning session: just by touching them you contaminate them with finger grease and dust/sand which is worse. In no time at all they scratch your lens coating (maybe you won't see it, but on a microscopic level they will scratch nonetheless). Also they don't absorb oily/fatty smears as well as optical tissue, they just smear it around.

So I almost totally agree with SkipD and his procedure (except for the LensPen which I use with great caution):

First - the goal is to clean the lens (or filter - I would use the very same process) without grinding any dirt/debris into the lens. To me, this absolutely dictates single-use surfaces for anything that touches the lens. That's why I use lens tissues instead of a washable cloth or - particularly - something like a lens pen.

The last 30 years or so I use high grade optical tissues used for microscopes and such.
The high grade type does not scratch the lens coating and absorbs oil quite well.
Use once and discard.

Since a couple of weeks I use LensPen to get rid of smears and water spots only. I was very sceptical but I'm a believer now:
works even better than optical tissue. It is unbelievable how clean my lenses are at the moment.
(and this is the first time I let something touch a lens more than once :) )
Since I am still concerned with dust/sand I will buy a new LensPen regularly.
I also use them only when the tissue fails to remove a spot or smear.


7D|400D|10-22|60 Macro|18-55|100-400L|600
Or: just about anything from real close to infinity
Mac Pro|calibrated Eizo monitor
Some of my photo's: http://www.allalin.nl/​photogallery/ (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
geekyrocketguy
Senior Member
Avatar
270 posts
Likes: 4
Joined Jan 2007
Location: Chantilly, VA
     
Mar 07, 2011 21:25 |  #24

Spit and swab it with a tshirt...


I don't try to intimidate people with my gear.
My Photography Site (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
itzcryptic
Goldmember
1,174 posts
Joined Sep 2006
Location: Cincinnati
     
Mar 07, 2011 21:29 |  #25

geekyrocketguy wrote in post #11977062 (external link)
Spit and swab it with a tshirt...

Yeah, this is closer to reality I would think. I'll use a cloth if I have one...if not, I gently wipe it with my shirt.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
oldvultureface
Goldmember
Avatar
4,243 posts
Gallery: 72 photos
Best ofs: 2
Likes: 269
Joined Jun 2008
Location: Northwest Indiana USA
     
Mar 07, 2011 21:46 |  #26

geekyrocketguy wrote in post #11977062 (external link)
Spit and swab it with a tshirt...

Two day old handkerchief and I have a cold.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
tgara
Goldmember
Avatar
2,336 posts
Likes: 7
Joined Sep 2007
Location: Connecticut, USA
     
Mar 07, 2011 21:58 as a reply to  @ oldvultureface's post |  #27

Here's the official Canon lens cleaning video showing how it should be done. Straight from the source...

http://cpn.canon-europe.com …terclass/lens_c​leaning.do (external link)


EOS 5D Mark III
EOS Rebel SL1
Full Gear List

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
HotRod34
Junior Member
Avatar
25 posts
Gallery: 8 photos
Likes: 21
Joined Mar 2009
     
Mar 07, 2011 22:32 |  #28

SkipD wrote in post #11965514 (external link)
A squeeze-bulb blower such as a Rocket Blower by Giottos, quality lens tissue (such as that sold by Kodak and now Tiffen), a good lens cleaning fluid, and PROPER TECHNIQUE is the way that I have cleaned my lenses for decades.

What is "proper technique"?

First - the goal is to clean the lens (or filter - I would use the very same process) without grinding any dirt/debris into the lens. To me, this absolutely dictates single-use surfaces for anything that touches the lens. That's why I use lens tissues instead of a washable cloth or - particularly - something like a lens pen.

Here are the steps that I use to clean a lens:

1. Use a squeeze-bulb blower to blow any loose dust off the lens. 90% of the time, step 1 is all that is necessary.

2. Take a lens tissue out of the pack. Fold it once, holding only what was the ends of the tissue. You want to be extremely careful to NEVER TOUCH the areas of the lens tissue that will be touching the lens. This will avoid transferring oils from your fingers to the lens.

3. Moisten the folded portion of the lens tissue with a little lens cleaner. You don't want the tissue dripping wet, but it must be damp.

CAUTION: NEVER apply lens cleaner directly to the lens (though it won’t hurt a filter, you don’t want liquid leaking into the lens’ innards).

4. Wipe LIGHTLY across the lens ONCE with the damp tissue. Then either turn it over or fold it so that you can wipe again, but with an unused surface. You can do this as often as needed, as long as you never wipe the lens twice with any surface of the tissue. This prevents scratches. Again, make sure you never touch an area of the tissue that will touch the lens.

5. Ensuring that the lens is actually clean, use a dry tissue, handled the same way as above, to wipe the lens dry. Since you have already removed the dirt, there's no risk of scratching the lens with the dry tissue.

6. Dispose of the used lens tissues in a proper trash receptacle.

That's it in a nutshell. Simple and effective. I've been cleaning my lenses this way for over 40 years, and all of them have pristine glass (and none have ever worn "protective" filters).

This is the best cleaning regimen I have seen. The coatings on lenses aren't nearly as durable as many people think they are.


http://www.flickr.com/​photos/hotrod34/ (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Buylongterm
Goldmember
Avatar
2,080 posts
Gallery: 1 photo
Likes: 53
Joined Jan 2010
Location: Chi-town
     
Mar 07, 2011 22:38 |  #29

oldvultureface wrote in post #11965550 (external link)
Rocket blower followed by LensPen followed by breath moisture followed by microfiber cloth. LensPen is particularly effective with greasy fingerprints and seagull droppings.

Me too. Gotta love the lens pen.


Christian
flickr (external link)
@WerthLiving (Follow me on Instagram)
Canon EOS 5D MK III Gripped | 35mm f/1.4L | 70-200mm f/2.8L IS MK II |100mm f/2.8L Macro | 24mm-105mm f/4.0L |

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
fvsurfer
THREAD ­ STARTER
Member
196 posts
Joined Jan 2011
     
Mar 08, 2011 00:48 |  #30

Sportidi wrote in post #11971207 (external link)
I picked up my new reading glasses today ($1,000) and my optometrist told me this......the glass needs to be wet.

Put a wet tissue on the glass, wipe the lens and use a soft lint cloth to clean it. He swears this is the best way to clean pro quality glass.

Are you serious? I should have just ignored this comment.


Canon EOS 60D/Sigma 30mm F1.4 EX DC

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

5,333 views & 0 likes for this thread
How To Clean My Lens?
FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is ed Wan
813 guests, 225 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 15144, that happened on Nov 22, 2018

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.