Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Bird Talk 
Thread started 12 Mar 2011 (Saturday) 13:11
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

How do you know you are getting close enough?

 
gasrocks
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
13,431 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Mar 2005
Location: Portage, Wisconsin USA
     
Mar 12, 2011 13:11 |  #1

A humorous but real list I give the students in my wild bird photograohy class: How do you know you are getting close enough to the wild birds? (My secret is to get very close and still use a long lens)

1 - Hey it's a bird.
2- I always did like Robins. (next might have been you can tell what sex it is but too many birds, both sexes look the same.)
3- You need to swith to vertical from horiz. to fit the bird into the frame.
4- You can tell me the color of their eyes. Many birds eyes are not black but a very dark red or brown, etc. I have a chart of the eye color change in the first 5 years of a Bald Eagles life. Great ID tip.
5- You can tell me the color of their tounge. If you ever have to guess - say orange.
6- You are using the clarity of the eye ring for editing images.
7- If you enlarge the eye, you can see your reflection in it.

How are you doing?


GEAR LIST
_______________

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
Silverfox1
Goldmember
Avatar
3,194 posts
Gallery: 3 photos
Likes: 54
Joined Aug 2009
Location: South Texas
     
Mar 12, 2011 14:41 |  #2

gasrocks wrote in post #12007311 (external link)
A humorous but real list I give the students in my wild bird photograohy class: How do you know you are getting close enough to the wild birds? (My secret is to get very close and still use a long lens)

1 - Hey it's a bird.
2- I always did like Robins. (next might have been you can tell what sex it is but too many birds, both sexes look the same.)
3- You need to swith to vertical from horiz. to fit the bird into the frame.
4- You can tell me the color of their eyes. Many birds eyes are not black but a very dark red or brown, etc. I have a chart of the eye color change in the first 5 years of a Bald Eagles life. Great ID tip.
5- You can tell me the color of their tounge. If you ever have to guess - say orange.
6- You are using the clarity of the eye ring for editing images.
7- If you enlarge the eye, you can see your reflection in it.

How are you doing?

Those are all good tips & advice.

Regards,


Silverfox1 POTN Feedback / TC Extender Tests / Gear List

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
gasrocks
THREAD ­ STARTER
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
13,431 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Mar 2005
Location: Portage, Wisconsin USA
     
Mar 12, 2011 14:48 |  #3

And tell us all where you are on the list usually.


GEAR LIST
_______________

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sandpiper
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
7,171 posts
Gallery: 1 photo
Likes: 50
Joined Aug 2006
Location: Merseyside, England
     
Mar 12, 2011 14:50 as a reply to  @ Silverfox1's post |  #4

I came up with a couple, shooting on the Farne Islands a couple of years ago.

1) When you are having to use the 24mm end of your 24-105L in order to get the whole bird in.

2) When you are having to shuffle backwards to focus because the bird is within your 8ft minimum focus distance. One particular puffin was a right bu**er, it kept following me as I shuffled backwards and stayed within the 8', obviously didn't want it's picture taken.

Amazing experience shooting on an island bird colony, you find yourself in a target rich environment and don't have to stalk anything they just sit there.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
gasrocks
THREAD ­ STARTER
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
13,431 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Mar 2005
Location: Portage, Wisconsin USA
     
Mar 12, 2011 15:00 |  #5

That's kinda cheating. I remember once I was out driving around "the block" and saw a Peacock. Stopped and got out with my 500. He came toward me. I forgot people riase Peacocks around here and he must have escaped. I kept running backwards and he followed. Probably thougth I was going to feed him.


GEAR LIST
_______________

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sandpiper
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
7,171 posts
Gallery: 1 photo
Likes: 50
Joined Aug 2006
Location: Merseyside, England
     
Mar 12, 2011 16:20 |  #6

gasrocks wrote in post #12007724 (external link)
That's kinda cheating. I remember once I was out driving around "the block" and saw a Peacock. Stopped and got out with my 500. He came toward me. I forgot people riase Peacocks around here and he must have escaped. I kept running backwards and he followed. Probably thougth I was going to feed him.

I don't think that is quite the same, but I agree bird photography is easier on an island where they don't feel particularly threatened (in fact photographers are in more danger from the birds - hard hats are recommended :D ). They are still wild birds, however, which I doubt was the case with the peacock.

I shoot birds in many situations, not all as easy as on the Farnes by any means, but I wouldn't call taking photos in a seabird breeding colony 'cheating', it's still recording an aspect of nature.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
gasrocks
THREAD ­ STARTER
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
13,431 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Mar 2005
Location: Portage, Wisconsin USA
     
Mar 12, 2011 17:18 |  #7

Sorry for my poor choice of words, spoken in jest. What you do is very valid just not what I had in mind when I made the post. Yes, the Peacock was indeed tame I found out. Making fun of myself for initially treating it as I do all wild birds. Sorry.


GEAR LIST
_______________

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
artyman
Sleepless in Hampshire
Avatar
14,402 posts
Gallery: 17 photos
Likes: 69
Joined Feb 2009
Location: Hampshire UK
     
Mar 12, 2011 17:52 |  #8

You get close enough when the birds spit on the lens :D


Art that takes you there. http://www.artyman.co.​uk (external link)
Ken
Canon 7D, 350D, 15-85, 18-55, 75-300, Cosina 100 Macro, Sigma 120-300

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
nordlysBW
Senior Member
Avatar
363 posts
Gallery: 3 photos
Likes: 29
Joined Jan 2010
     
Mar 13, 2011 13:15 as a reply to  @ artyman's post |  #9

And when once more you are going to get clipped wings or a chopped off tail because you were far too close to get that bunch of feathers in flight, obsessed as you were to get a close-up of the beak, some feather details or that piercing eye.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
scrumpy
Goldmember
Avatar
3,664 posts
Joined Jun 2004
Location: Dorset, England
     
Mar 14, 2011 05:57 |  #10

gasrocks wrote in post #12007724 (external link)
That's kinda cheating. I remember once I was out driving around "the block" and saw a Peacock. Stopped and got out with my 500. He came toward me. I forgot people riase Peacocks around here and he must have escaped. I kept running backwards and he followed. Probably thougth I was going to feed him.

Nah. Probably fancied you :lol: Peacocks are randy so-and-so's!


David: Canon EOS 400D - Canon EF70-300mm f/4-55.6 IS USM -Sigma 17-70 F2.8-4.5 DC Macro - Sigma 50-500 'Bigma' - Speedlite 580EX 11 - Better Beamer
Have patience. All things are difficult before they become easy ;)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Levina ­ de ­ Ruijter
I'm a bloody goody two-shoes!
Avatar
18,451 posts
Gallery: 319 photos
Best ofs: 10
Likes: 7650
Joined Sep 2008
Location: Amsterdam, The Netherlands, EU
     
Mar 14, 2011 06:40 |  #11

When they come charging! Which happened a while ago with a very agressive young male Mute Swan. I got up and ran! And yesterday a crow with a dead rat became very intimidating when I came too close. I backed off some...


Levina (not Lavina, Lavinia, Levinia, Ludwina and what not, mkay?)
My flickr (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Jon ­ C
Senior Member
760 posts
Joined Dec 2010
Location: Solvang, California
     
Mar 17, 2011 00:35 as a reply to  @ Levina de Ruijter's post |  #12

Jeeeez. I'm going to have to go where I can find some of 'your kind' of birds. The ones around here take off like my camera was a 12 guage shotgun. They fly up into the tallest Eucalyptus tree they can find and sit there laughing at me.

I'm either going to have to get a camo blind, or a yellow 'Big Bird' suit.


Canon 7D | EF 24-105L | EF 70-300 | EF 400 5.6L

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Levina ­ de ­ Ruijter
I'm a bloody goody two-shoes!
Avatar
18,451 posts
Gallery: 319 photos
Best ofs: 10
Likes: 7650
Joined Sep 2008
Location: Amsterdam, The Netherlands, EU
     
Mar 17, 2011 06:04 |  #13

LOL... I don't know about that yellow 'Big Bird' suit, Jon. Eagles or Vultures might see you as the tastiest lunch ever! :mrgreen:


Levina (not Lavina, Lavinia, Levinia, Ludwina and what not, mkay?)
My flickr (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Muteki
Member
200 posts
Likes: 67
Joined Jul 2009
     
Mar 17, 2011 12:54 |  #14

Jon C wrote in post #12035906 (external link)
Jeeeez. I'm going to have to go where I can find some of 'your kind' of birds. The ones around here take off like my camera was a 12 guage shotgun. They fly up into the tallest Eucalyptus tree they can find and sit there laughing at me.

I'm either going to have to get a camo blind, or a yellow 'Big Bird' suit.

Another photographer might be photographing you thinking the big yellow bird is a rare species. The hunter becomes the prey (in photography) all of sudden. :D


Raymond

Gears| (external link)Flickr |  (external link)5∞px (external link)|  (external link)Facebook (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

2,819 views & 0 likes for this thread
How do you know you are getting close enough?
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Bird Talk 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is VTKRZY
887 guests, 255 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 15144, that happened on Nov 22, 2018

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.