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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 13 Mar 2011 (Sunday) 17:02
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What are your techniques for stabilizing a zoom lens?

 
konfuzd1
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Mar 14, 2011 10:20 as a reply to  @ post 12015424 |  #16

Thanks for the ideas yall. Kjonnnn, your link looks a lot like what I'm already doing, I just grab my right forearm instead of shoulder. Definitely think I'll look into the shoulder rig though. Maybe DIY something. Anyone had any success going that route?


Gripped 50D; Rebel T2I; Rebel 35mm; EF 28-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM; 50mm f/1.8 USM II; 70-200mm f/4.0L IS USM; 430EX II (and just for fun, Rokinon 500 f/6.3 mirror and 2x tube)
http://www.facebook.co​m/milliner.john?sk=pho​tos (external link)

  
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RDKirk
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Mar 14, 2011 10:56 |  #17

jeremytf wrote in post #12014485 (external link)
If you pay attention, there are often opportunities to lean against a wall, rest your elbow on a railing, and otherwise take advantage of other structures. That can greatly help, in addition to being aware of your breathing and timing your shots accordingly.

Yes, that above. Eighty percent of the time, there is something to lean against. Take every opportunity not to depend on your own shaky legs.




  
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ben805
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Mar 14, 2011 12:08 |  #18

kung-fu grip the camera and hold breath.


5D Mark III, Samyang 14mm, 35LII, 85L II, 100L IS Macro, 24-105L, 70-200L 2.8 IS II. 580EX, AB400, AB800.

  
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Cubdriver
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Mar 14, 2011 14:26 |  #19

If there's nothing handy to brace against (a tree, wall, fence, etc), then I stand with my right hand holding the camera, left hand cradling lens and with both elbows drawn in tight to my body, feet apart for stability. Try to shoot at a shutter speed equal to the reciprocal of the focal length or higher (eg 1/100th or greater for 100mm, 1/200th or greater for 200mm) as a general rule of thumb when handholding.

-Pat


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rang
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Mar 14, 2011 15:44 |  #20

konfuzd1 wrote in post #12012871 (external link)
I'm looking for ideas on how to get better shots at slower shutter speeds. So far, I've figured out that if I grab my right arm with my left hand, the lens will rest perfectly on my left elbow and be much less shaky.

I've been using this technique (sort of like a modified version of the one Joe McNally uses) for a couple years now when I don't have a stick or legs around for support with long glass.

Seems to work best if your left eyed. And doesn't work well if you don't have gripped or Pro body.

Probably good for a couple stops.

The ONLY way that works for me with the slowish and way long Tammy 200-500 handheld (lucky thing it's light in weight).


Lotsa stuff, running outta room and a wife...I keep looking at her and wondering??? :lol:

  
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RDKirk
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Mar 14, 2011 15:52 |  #21

Quizzical_Squirrel wrote in post #12018437 (external link)
I thought I read that it was best to breathe out rather than hold your breath.

Target shooting technique: Breath out halfway, hold, shoot. Don't hold for more than a moment, though, or the tension to breathe again will start you shaking.

Also, shooting in continuous mode helps--the second and subsequent shots will be less affected by the initial squeeze of the shutter release.




  
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rang
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Mar 14, 2011 15:58 |  #22

DreDaze wrote in post #12013033 (external link)
i've never seen that technique...it seems like it would be exhausting...

here's another video link:
http://www.youtube.com​/watch?v=EDsx3-FWfwk (external link)

i usually have my elbow into my body at about a 45degree angle...sometimes i do the method above, and use my shoulder

In the first link the guy with the orange stripped shirt takes his left hand/wrist and sort of limply tucks it into the crux of his right arm. I actually take my right hand and grab my right forearm. This makes a "cage" of your arms so it's very sturdy/stable. Especially compared to all the flex points of your wrists/hands in the classic hand hold near the base of the lens/body location...even with your elbows tucked into your chest.
With the body crammed into your left shoulder (bearing most of the rig weight and the left elbow under the end of your long lens...it's surprizingly stable.
Done this way it's not exhausing when they are you get used to it. Seems like the big muscles in your shoulder and arms do ok even with a 100-400L for long periods.

But ultimately a monopod or legs would be even better.
But when you don't have either...


Lotsa stuff, running outta room and a wife...I keep looking at her and wondering??? :lol:

  
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icassell
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Mar 14, 2011 16:01 |  #23

Although this deals with lenses longer than yours, it still may be useful

http://www.naturephoto​graphers.net/ejp0801-1.html (external link)

and another that may be more useful

http://www.moosepeters​on.com/techtips/shortl​ens.html (external link)


Ian - http://www.icassell.sm​ugmug.com (external link)
Canon 7D2, 7D, 30D, Canon 500 f/4L, Canon EF 400/5.6L, Canon 70-200/2.8L II, Canon 100/2.8 Macro, Tamron 17-50/2.8, Canon 50/1.8 Mk I, Canon 40/2.8 STM, Rokinon 8/3.5 FE., Sigma 10-20EX/4-5.6, Sigma 1.4X and 2X EX, Canon 1.4x II, Induro CT313/AT214/GHB-2, Canon 600EX-RT, Olympus TG-3

  
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JohnB57
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Mar 14, 2011 16:11 as a reply to  @ post 12019077 |  #24

Adjust your strap fairly long, use live-view and pull the strap tight against your neck to give a third brace point, composing using the screen. A technique I used to use on 35mm but you had to guess the composition! Very useful for video also.




  
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rang
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Mar 14, 2011 16:12 |  #25

konfuzd1 wrote in post #12016929 (external link)
Thanks for the ideas yall. Kjonnnn, your link looks a lot like what I'm already doing, I just grab my right forearm instead of shoulder. Definitely think I'll look into the shoulder rig though. Maybe DIY something. Anyone had any success going that route?

I've used this Bush Hawk rig for a couple years now shooting BIF, bears etc.
Found a Brit firm that makes a hotshoe mount for a heads up reticle rifle sight.
Once you dial in the rifle site with the center circle in the view finder you can just use the reticle and track your target and fire away.

Even figured out how to mount it on a Cotton Carrier so toting it around with a 100-400L is not tiring at all.

It just looks really menacing so I don't use it at stadiums or shooting people.

:lol:

http://bushhawk.com/ (external link)


Lotsa stuff, running outta room and a wife...I keep looking at her and wondering??? :lol:

  
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pilsburypie
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Mar 14, 2011 16:21 as a reply to  @ post 12015424 |  #26

certainly all of the above.

If I have no tripod, which is most of the time, I firstly look for something to lean against to help steady me. If not as said previously, I hold the body with my right and the lens underneath with my left pulling my elbows tight into my body. If the ground is dry I might sit down, fold my knees up and use them as a rest for the lens. All the time I'm looking through the viewfinder I'm breathing slowly holding my breath a second or two before gently squeezing the shutter.

Also keep your shutter speed high - I had a problem when I first got my 70-200f4is. IS helps, but I don't think I was used to the focal length.


Mark
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Pasukun
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Mar 14, 2011 16:34 |  #27

Right hand on the grip and shutter button, while left hand supporting the lens. (Do not grip it too firm)
Before I squeeze the shutter button, I level my breathing 1st then breath out all the air from my lungs.
If there is a wall, lean yourself against it.


"the things we touch have no permanence.. as there is nothing we can hold onto in this world.. only by letting it go can we truly possess what is real.."

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Refresh ­ Image
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Mar 14, 2011 16:48 |  #28
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Drink less, excersize more.




  
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bogeypro
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Mar 14, 2011 20:08 as a reply to  @ Refresh Image's post |  #29

Don't drink any coffee .... no Dr. Pepper either




  
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dhilo2
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Mar 14, 2011 21:58 |  #30

I prefer the right hand on the camera, left hand underneath the lens and the left elbow braced against my ribcage. I dont shoot straight forward but more of at a 45 degree angle to the left. Feet usually spread apart for good stance


EOS 5Dc+BG-E4, 35L, 135 L, 24-70L f2.8, 70-200L f2.8 IS

  
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What are your techniques for stabilizing a zoom lens?
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