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Thread started 14 Mar 2011 (Monday) 18:33
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Why is it a good idea to use an ND filter?

 
pxchoi
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Mar 14, 2011 18:33 |  #1

Other than to get a long exposure/flowing effect, why do some people prefer to use an ND filter under bright conditions?

I shoot at f2.8 pretty often and I know that under bright conditions I'll have to shoot at higher shutter speeds, but is that necessarily a bad thing? Or is there another underlying reason to use an ND filter?

Thanks!


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Bendel
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Mar 14, 2011 18:36 |  #2

People use them to balance the exposure between different parts of the photo. A good use of a ND filter: If you have a bright sky and a dark foreground. You can use a ND filter to properly expose both areas of the picture.


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Grumbledook
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Mar 14, 2011 18:45 |  #3

well its anything that would require a longer exposure

you can use it to having moving things like traffic and people not expose on the picture

just to be clear bendals suggestion would be a graduated ND filter rather than a standard ND filter

so its just about controlling the factors of exposure like changing the aperture, iso or shutter speed




  
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thenextguy
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Mar 14, 2011 18:54 |  #4

pxchoi wrote in post #12020183 (external link)
Other than to get a long exposure/flowing effect, why do some people prefer to use an ND filter under bright conditions?

I shoot at f2.8 pretty often and I know that under bright conditions I'll have to shoot at higher shutter speeds, but is that necessarily a bad thing?

It could be if you're using lights.


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Jon
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Mar 14, 2011 18:59 as a reply to  @ thenextguy's post |  #5

pxchoi wrote in post #12020183 (external link)
Other than to get a long exposure/flowing effect, why do some people prefer to use an ND filter under bright conditions?

I shoot at f2.8 pretty often and I know that under bright conditions I'll have to shoot at higher shutter speeds, but is that necessarily a bad thing? Or is there another underlying reason to use an ND filter?

Thanks!

Well, it could be, if you wanted to isolate, say, a runner while panning to give a sense of motion.

Bendel wrote in post #12020206 (external link)
People use them to balance the exposure between different parts of the photo. A good use of a ND filter: If you have a bright sky and a dark foreground. You can use a ND filter to properly expose both areas of the picture.

That'd be graduated ND filters, not solid NDs. Different applications in spite of sounding similar.


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MarkyRB
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Mar 14, 2011 18:59 |  #6

it can be useful for video to get shallow depth of field and a low enough shutter speed to avoid jelly vision.




  
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Bendel
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Mar 14, 2011 19:06 |  #7

Jon wrote in post #12020383 (external link)
That'd be graduated ND filters, not solid NDs. Different applications in spite of sounding similar.

Well a graduated ND filter is still a ND filter...just a specific type. He didn't specify, so I didn't specify.


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peter_n
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Mar 14, 2011 21:01 |  #8

I have a 50mm/f1.0 lens and use an ND filter on it to shoot at f1 in bright sunlight for DOF effects.


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pxchoi
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Mar 14, 2011 21:12 |  #9

Jon wrote in post #12020383 (external link)
Well, it could be, if you wanted to isolate, say, a runner while panning to give a sense of motion.

That'd be graduated ND filters, not solid NDs. Different applications in spite of sounding similar.

Good idea. I guess I'm considering a ND filter and I'm trying to justify whether it is worth it and whether or not it will get used.


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booja
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Mar 14, 2011 21:30 |  #10

i use my nd filter for

1. so i can shoot at 1.2 and 1.4 in bright daylight.
2. to get my SS down so i can capture motion
3. to reduce the SS to get it under sync speeds when using triggers and flashes outside in day light




  
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rvdw98
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Mar 15, 2011 03:25 |  #11

Bendel wrote in post #12020429 (external link)
Well a graduated ND filter is still a ND filter...just a specific type. He didn't specify, so I didn't specify.

So if someone asks you how to use a bike, you'd tell them it's used to cross a river? After all, a water bike is still a bike, just a specific type. :D

Just like when people say "bike" they commonly refer to a road bike, when people say "ND" they commonly refer to a solid ND. So when you describe an application of a GND, it's prudent to mention that you're referring to that particular type of filter.


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Depth
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Mar 15, 2011 04:27 |  #12

When my shutter speed isn't fast enough I use them. And this usually happens when I'm outside shooting wide open with any of my camera's that use leaf shutters.


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rvdw98
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Mar 15, 2011 04:43 |  #13

Depth wrote in post #12022883 (external link)
When my shutter speed isn't fast enough I use them.

You use ND filters when your shutter speed isn't fast enough?


Roy

  
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thedge
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Mar 15, 2011 05:44 |  #14

rvdw98 wrote in post #12022913 (external link)
You use ND filters when your shutter speed isn't fast enough?

Hes talking about leaf shutters. I had to google for it. Leaf shutters often have one speed, so in his case if that speed isnt high enough to expose correctly he would need to use an ND filter.


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rvdw98
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Mar 15, 2011 06:50 |  #15

thedge wrote in post #12023047 (external link)
Hes talking about leaf shutters. I had to google for it. Leaf shutters often have one speed, so in his case if that speed isnt high enough to expose correctly he would need to use an ND filter.

That makes sense. Thanks for clarifying!


Roy

  
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Why is it a good idea to use an ND filter?
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