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FORUMS General Gear Talk Flash and Studio Lighting 
Thread started 20 Mar 2011 (Sunday) 21:47
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POLL: "Would you take a shoot that had to be shot on film?"
Absolutely no problem in fact lets shoot slide film
42
45.2%
I'll give it a shot but I make no guaranties
42
45.2%
No way I don't even know how to load film
9
9.7%

93 voters, 93 votes given (1 choice only choices can be voted per member)). VOTING IS FOR MEMBERS ONLY.
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How solid are you skills

 
Damian75
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Mar 20, 2011 21:47 |  #1

So in the modern world of digital photography and instant review just how confident are you in your photography and lighting skills. If a client came to you to do a shoot with studio lights be it in studio or on location, but had one stipulation, the shoot must be done on film. How confident are you in your skills, can you nail the shots without being able to review them and make adjustments. Would you take a paying gig with this stipulation? I am just curious in this modern age where so my emphasis is put on post production just how solid are your photography and lighting basics.


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BrandonSi
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Mar 20, 2011 21:51 |  #2

Damian75 wrote in post #12059438 (external link)
So in the modern world of digital photography and instant review just how confident are you in your photography and lighting skills. If a client came to you to do a shoot with studio lights be it in studio or on location, but had one stipulation, the shoot must be done on film. How confident are you in your skills, can nail the shots without being able to review them and make adjustments. Would you take a paying gig with this stipulation? I am just curious in this modern age where so my emphasis is put on post production just how solid are your photography and lighting basics.

I would buy a lot of film...

after I went out and rented a 35mm SLR. ;)


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JayCee ­ Images
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Mar 20, 2011 21:51 |  #3

As long as I am allowed a light meter, quite confident. ;)


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Crazy ­ Horse
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Mar 20, 2011 21:55 as a reply to  @ BrandonSi's post |  #4

I would have a difficult time since my current method of balancing ambient with flash is:

1: Set flashes to power setting I *think* is close to what I am going for.
2: Shoot.
3: Review Histogram / image.
4: Correct
5: Shoot.


Without the ability to review, my current method wouldn't be so hot. :P


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zacm7
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Mar 20, 2011 21:58 as a reply to  @ Crazy Horse's post |  #5

I have been shooting for 6 years now and for 3 of those years i mainly shot with my f100 and slide film...the only part about film i had a hard time with was shooting b&w, its a lot harder then it looks. But yes I am always looking for old film stuff...currently looking for a bronica to put in my bag.


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DC ­ Fan
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Mar 20, 2011 22:19 |  #6

Damian75 wrote in post #12059438 (external link)
If a client came to you to do a shoot with studio lights be it in studio or on location, but had one stipulation, the shoot must be done on film. How confident are you in your skills, can you nail the shots without being able to review them and make adjustments. Would you take a paying gig with this stipulation? I am just curious in this modern age where so my emphasis is put on post production just how solid are your photography and lighting basics.

This is based on at least two incorrect assumptions.

The first assumption is that "studio shoots" using film have been limited in the number of exposures. Even in the era when medium format film was the preferred medium for studio photography, there was a method to get instant feedback to confirm exposure, lighting and framing was correct -- instant Polaroid film. Photographers would use Polaroid film of the same speed as the medium format film, shoot test frames using the Polaroid film, check the test frames on the spot to make sure that the lighting setup was correct, and then use the preferred medium format film for the working exposure. Even with the Polaroid tests, the most effective studio photographers would expose dozens or hundreds of frames to get a handful of good images. Also, bracketing of images didn't just start when digital cameras were invested: that's a technique carried over from the film era.

The second incorrect assumption is that post-production somehow began with digital cameras. Film editing is older than rollfilm, and reprocessing of actual negatives was an art and science long before digital imaging was born. Basic techniques such as burning and dodging were fundamental elements of editing images before the Speed Graphic era, and the initial releases of programs such as Photoshop mimicked the common film editing techniques. Again, "post production" wasn't just invented in the last ten years.

This comment is based on the assumption that there's some sort of technical or artistic superiority in taking as few pictures as possible to satisfy an imaginary client. Whether large format film, medium format film or any of the many digital formats has been used, the most important factor is being effective.




  
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anlenke
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Mar 20, 2011 22:21 |  #7

I still shoot a roll (give or take) at every shoot). Often, they are favorites of the clients. Definitely, wouldn't hesitate to take a job like that; I'd be excited to meet a client that wanted it!

Edit: I'd want to be able to develop my film too.


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flowrider
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Mar 20, 2011 22:24 |  #8

Yes but with a light meter and a Polaroid back for the med. format or a large format camera.

35mm. No.


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Damian75
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Mar 20, 2011 22:40 |  #9

DC Fan wrote in post #12059600 (external link)
This is based on at least two incorrect assumptions.

The first assumption is that "studio shoots" using film have been limited in the number of exposures. Even in the era when medium format film was the preferred medium for studio photography, there was a method to get instant feedback to confirm exposure, lighting and framing was correct -- instant Polaroid film. Photographers would use Polaroid film of the same speed as the medium format film, shoot test frames using the Polaroid film, check the test frames on the spot to make sure that the lighting setup was correct, and then use the preferred medium format film for the working exposure. Even with the Polaroid tests, the most effective studio photographers would expose dozens or hundreds of frames to get a handful of good images. Also, bracketing of images didn't just start when digital cameras were invested: that's a technique carried over from the film era.

The second incorrect assumption is that post-production somehow began with digital cameras. Film editing is older than rollfilm, and reprocessing of actual negatives was an art and science long before digital imaging was born. Basic techniques such as burning and dodging were fundamental elements of editing images before the Speed Graphic era, and the initial releases of programs such as Photoshop mimicked the common film editing techniques. Again, "post production" wasn't just invented in the last ten years.

This comment is based on the assumption that there's some sort of technical or artistic superiority in taking as few pictures as possible to satisfy an imaginary client. Whether large format film, medium format film or any of the many digital formats has been used, the most important factor is being effective.

I put no limit on how many shots you could take. I am also well aware that Polaroid proofing was done by high end photographers I have several in my family but it was not in wide spread use by most as the film used ran about $2 a shot and was mostly used to check light placement. Also yes airbrushing and dodging and burning have been around for a very long time, in fact many of the tools in Photoshop are based off of old style photo tools. But these were again not used on the wide spread scale as now were anyone with a computer has access. My post was simply a theoretical exercise to see how people think their skills would hold up if they didn't have the modern aids. I personally think that anything that brings more people into photography is a good thing, that said do we now days spend as much time learning and working on our photography technique as we do on our PP skills?


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equation112
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Mar 20, 2011 22:57 |  #10

well... I have alot of film experience - was mainly a natural light specialist back then, so would just fall back on that skillset.




  
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yogestee
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Mar 21, 2011 00:44 as a reply to  @ equation112's post |  #11

I've shot a sh!t load of slide film in over 30 years in photography,, 35mm, 120/220 and 4x5..


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blad3s
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Mar 21, 2011 01:21 as a reply to  @ yogestee's post |  #12

At the moment many photographers are at an age where they started with film....... I still remember the hours and hours I spent in the darkroom with streaming eyes. I now regularly meet photographers that have never used film so suspect it's just a matter of time before photographers with film experience become a tiny tiny minority and perhaps even die out?


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bhursey
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Mar 21, 2011 07:43 as a reply to  @ blad3s's post |  #13

I shoot film for fun right now. I shot 3 rolls this week nailing the exposure on each shot with my Nikon FM2n... Mainly outside natural light If I had a light meater i could absolutly do 35mm inside with studio lights..


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Zansho
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Mar 21, 2011 07:49 |  #14

I shot with a Mamiya 645 before making the switch to digital, and before that, I shot with my old Canon EOS1 35mm. I have no problems making a switch back to film, and if we're talking black and white, I'd have to do my own developing as I generally will add on about another 10-20 seconds of developing time, with Kodak T-Max film. I also liked to use Ilford Delta, and for film, Fuji NPS and Kodak VC.


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Village_Idiot
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Mar 21, 2011 11:25 |  #15

blad3s wrote in post #12060442 (external link)
At the moment many photographers are at an age where they started with film....... I still remember the hours and hours I spent in the darkroom with streaming eyes. I now regularly meet photographers that have never used film so suspect it's just a matter of time before photographers with film experience become a tiny tiny minority and perhaps even die out?

Of course. Everyone has a computer or has access to a computer. What would take a dark room (which is huge compared to say, a 15" laptop), and the time and dedication to develop and process film can now be done with a computer and an editing program.

How long would it take to get an explosure or a person edited and ready to be printed at 24"x30" size? How long would it take to develop and do basic adjustments to 100 photos from a wedding? That's something that can be done in 15 minutes with Light Room or Aperture.


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