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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
Thread started 20 Mar 2011 (Sunday) 23:57
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Shooting towards the sun..

 
pathfndr
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Mar 20, 2011 23:57 |  #1

The manual mentions that I shouldn't shoot directly at the sun, or I might damage the sensor...

...But there are times when I like do that (and have done it, but with film..) not sunset nor sunrise but high noon on a clear summer day..

..Is there any way I can do this without cooking my sensor? ND filter maybe..? If so, what grade..? Also.. what qualifies as "direct"...anywhere in the finder?




  
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Sdiver2489
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Mar 21, 2011 00:01 |  #2

pathfndr wrote in post #12060117 (external link)
The manual mentions that I shouldn't shoot directly at the sun, or I might damage the sensor...

...But there are times when I like do that (and have done it, but with film..) not sunset nor sunrise but high noon on a clear summer day..

..Is there any way I can do this without cooking my sensor? ND filter maybe..? If so, what grade..? Also.. what qualifies as "direct"...anywhere in the finder?

I've "shot the sun" plenty of times...just don't do a 30 second time exposure of the sun at F1.2 ISO 12800 and I'm sure you'll be fine.


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tonylong
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Mar 21, 2011 00:17 |  #3

Like Sdiver says, the camera docs basically just warn you of practices -- for example, leaving Mirror Lockup on for a long time can damage the shutter, and long exposures can damage the sensor. And, these can be exacerbated by telephoto lenses due to the magnification/intensif​ying of the light (think magnifying glass).

Aside from such common-sense precautions there are also interesting complications when you are using flash extenders such as the Better Beamer (useful in wildlife photography) which use a special lens that extends the flash out to distances meant for long lens exposures -- people who inadvertently leave that rig pointed into the sun have discovered a melted flash!

All that being said, it's not that our gear is "fragile", per se -- I remember at least once I inadvertently left my mirror lockup on once when shooting a sunset scene -- I caught it, no damage was done, nothing to see here, folks, move along:)!


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Saint728
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Mar 21, 2011 00:19 |  #4

I shoot directly into the sun on many occasions either sunrise or sunsets. If I need to do a long exposure I usually go with a CPL or a ND/GND filter.

Take Care,
Cheers, Patrick


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DC ­ Fan
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Mar 21, 2011 00:47 as a reply to  @ Saint728's post |  #5

Actual pictures deliberately taken facing the sun.

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The direction was chosen to keep the subjects from squinting when facing the bright sunshine. The main illumination came from a Sunpak 383 shoe-mounted flash, which lit the subjects very well. The shadows at the subjects' feet shows the brightness of the sun, but the single flash handled the subject exposure with no problems at the close distances used.



  
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Crazy ­ Horse
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Mar 21, 2011 01:00 as a reply to  @ DC Fan's post |  #6

I've taken many photos directly into the sun, no issues.. yet ;)


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porky101
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Mar 21, 2011 05:57 |  #7

mirror lockup damages the shutter?

I always use it for long exposures.....no issues yet.

I have taken loads of pics of the sun , F20 1/4000th second @ iso100 no problems yet




  
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tonylong
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Mar 21, 2011 09:16 |  #8

porky101 wrote in post #12061015 (external link)
mirror lockup damages the shutter?

The idea that MLU for a prolonged time with a telephoto lens magnifying the sun can have a detrimental affect on the shutter.

I always use it for long exposures.....no issues yet.

I have taken loads of pics of the sun , F20 1/4000th second @ iso100 no problems yet

Normal photography with the sun in the frame shouldn't bother things.


Tony
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pathfndr
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Mar 21, 2011 10:05 as a reply to  @ tonylong's post |  #9

Thank you everyone




  
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KhanhD
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Mar 21, 2011 21:21 |  #10

facing/shooting INTO the sun is a WHOLE lot different than shooting the sun.


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pathfndr
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Mar 22, 2011 00:09 as a reply to  @ KhanhD's post |  #11

I guess I should say "shooting the sun" then...




  
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mike_311
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Mar 23, 2011 06:08 |  #12

pathfndr wrote in post #12067289 (external link)
I guess I should say "shooting the sun" then...

treat it like you eyes. a quick glance wont hurt but staring fore bore may do damage.


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robtaylor22
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Mar 23, 2011 08:24 |  #13

Many pros take shots with the sun in the photo. Nothing wrong with it as long as you understand what that does to exposure and you compensate accordingly. Otherwise remember a lens focuses light and if a lens is left pointing at the sun for a prolonged period damage can occur. But for normal type shooting there is no reason not to include the sun if it helps your shot.




  
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Shooting towards the sun..
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