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Thread started 21 Mar 2011 (Monday) 05:09
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Any lighting tips for a beginning natural light shooter?

 
emperorevo86
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Mar 21, 2011 05:09 |  #1

Hey gang, my friend just asked me to do his engagement pictures. I always been a strobiest since day one. Never really tried out a whole lot of out door using natural lighting much. When I did, I would shoot during mid day light when it's really not the best time to do a shoot. But I was challenging myself to see if I can beat the sun. So I pulled out a reflector and guess what my subject started complaining because the reflector was hurting their eyes etc. I tried my best to place the reflector where it shouldn't blind my subject, but just never really had a picture where their eyes don't squint. So is there any tips for a mid day light shooter like myself. I would prefer shooting right before the sunset, but not every clients time is as flexible as you would like them to be. Come on you outdoor shooter gurus. Give me your best shot.


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Ashura
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Mar 21, 2011 05:34 |  #2

In order to kill midday shadows more effeciently, reflected light should come from the opposite of the sun, i.e. under the face. At such an angle, you shouldn't blind your model.
Also, I'm assuming you used a silver or golden reflector ? White ones provide softer light, which is good to kill the shadows, and your model won't be as easily blinded.


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emperorevo86
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Mar 21, 2011 05:47 |  #3

I tried using white and silver only. You know what I'm gonna test out some more shots to see what works best for the situation.


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kraaazymike
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Mar 21, 2011 09:52 as a reply to  @ emperorevo86's post |  #4

If you have to shoot mid-day, you can go under the shade of a large tree etc. Or, you can use a overhead diffusion panel made of fabric placed above your subject. You can make one at home or buy them over priced from any store :) Unless you make one that's stationary that your subject can walk under, you're going to need an assistant.

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Benji
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Mar 21, 2011 10:32 |  #5

I tell my clients that I will NOT shoot in mid day sunshine and I tell them why, then I tell them when I will shoot (late afternoon) and ask them which late aftenoon will work best for them. You MUST be the one calling the shots not them. When they tell you when they will be photographed, and the images suck guess who gets blamed for the bad shots. YOU.

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Shockey
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Mar 21, 2011 10:36 |  #6

Benji wrote in post #12062141 (external link)
I tell my clients that I will NOT shoot in mid day sunshine and I tell them why, then I tell them when I will shoot (late afternoon) and ask them which late aftenoon will work best for them. You MUST be the one calling the shots not them. When they tell you when they will be photographed, and the images suck guess who gets blamed for the bad shots. YOU.

Benji

^this

Why shoot during the worst time of the day. They hire a professional to take professional quality pictures. Take them during the correct time of the day when you have good light.

Easy for me to say ha....I can pass on jobs I don't want to shoot...

If you have no choice, shoot with the sun at their backs with some fill or no flash and let the background go.
Or find some shady areas where there is some nice light on the edges...just be ready to do some color adjustment.

I never use reflectors....ever.


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emperorevo86
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Mar 21, 2011 16:25 |  #7

Shockey wrote in post #12062166 (external link)
^this

I never use reflectors....ever.

what do you use to fill up your subject? Ok looks like I'll have to make the call. Yes I tried using a
Diffuser panel that kinda help with the squinting. Ill have to say no to shooting in the wrong time of the day. All of the tips are as expected, I just thought there's something new and secretive to learn from the pro in here. Thanx guys for your inputs.


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gonzogolf
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Mar 21, 2011 16:27 |  #8

I'm not sure why you wouldn't use your strobes?




  
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emperorevo86
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Mar 21, 2011 19:32 |  #9

I wanna try out natural light, I really like the results I've seen so far. I might just go with a speedlite with an umbrella.


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gonzogolf
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Mar 21, 2011 22:17 |  #10

emperorevo86 wrote in post #12065475 (external link)
I wanna try out natural light, I really like the results I've seen so far. I might just go with a speedlite with an umbrella.

Sorry but shooting natural light in the middle of the day simply to prove that it can be done seems silly to me when you have tools to mitigate the bad natural light.




  
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Any lighting tips for a beginning natural light shooter?
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