Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS General Gear Talk Flash and Studio Lighting 
Thread started 28 Mar 2011 (Monday) 12:08
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

BXRi500's Readout

 
wizard13
Goldmember
Avatar
1,169 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Apr 2006
Location: Western NY
     
Mar 28, 2011 12:08 |  #1

This may be a real basic question but here goes.
With the Elinchrom BXRi500's there is a digital readout on the back for the power output (2.5, 3.4, etc.). The manual states the watt power of this value but how can this value be related to the f-stop that is so often referenced on this forum for the lights? How can I relate this reading to f9 for instance?
I do understand distance comes into place, like 2.8 goes to 4 if the light backups up 4ft I think.
Thanks in advance and if I have overlooked a link for this in the stickies I apologize.


Photography = a constant learning process
Website (external link) || Facebook (external link) || Gear/Feedback

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
sigma ­ pi
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
11,204 posts
Likes: 5
Joined Apr 2010
Location: Los Angeles
     
Mar 28, 2011 12:42 |  #2

each full number is a full stop. Example if you adjust the power on the strobe from 3.0 to 4.0 would be f9 - f11. (just random numbers thrown out your mileage may vary). It is really easy once you know how it works :)


Don't try to confuse me with the facts, my mind is already made up.
http://www.flickr.com …6850267535/in/p​hotostream (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Csae
Goldmember
Avatar
3,350 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Nov 2008
Location: Montreal, Canada
     
Mar 28, 2011 13:15 |  #3

Its a bit more complex then translating the digital read-out into a Fstop, things like distance, modifier make all the difference here.

A 2x diffusion SB will eat up more light then an umbrella. EVen different SBs eat different amounts of light.

So the two are generally kept different, when you want to shoot f9, either meter, or get to know your modifiers, so you'll be able to predict based on distance.

For example, my BD would eat up a stop, so if i set my light at 4.0 and i get roughly 9 feet away, i can predict to get roughly f9. (example)

IIRC, elinchrom's readout is universal to its lights, so a 400w at 3.0 is outputting the same power as a 500w at 3.0 and the same as 1200w at 3.0. (If i remember correctly..) Makes predicting things nice n easy :)


Feel free to call me Case.
CasePhoto.ca (external link) - FanPage (external link)
-Montreal based Photography.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Lichtwerk
Goldmember
Avatar
1,372 posts
Joined Apr 2010
Location: Berlin, Germany
     
Mar 28, 2011 13:29 |  #4

Csae wrote in post #12109839 (external link)
IIRC, elinchrom's readout is universal to its lights, so a 400w at 3.0 is outputting the same power as a 500w at 3.0 and the same as 1200w at 3.0. (If i remember correctly..) Makes predicting things nice n easy :)

Correct! :)
Also makes metering pretty easy.


Dennis
Grip Aficionado
500px (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sigma ­ pi
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
11,204 posts
Likes: 5
Joined Apr 2010
Location: Los Angeles
     
Mar 28, 2011 13:30 |  #5

Csae wrote in post #12109839 (external link)
IIRC, elinchrom's readout is universal to its lights, so a 400w at 3.0 is outputting the same power as a 500w at 3.0 and the same as 1200w at 3.0. (If i remember correctly..) Makes predicting things nice n easy :)

You are correct.

I guess I should have been more clear. All thing equal and you just change the out put on the strobe, thats what it should be like. Of coarse its never perfect.


Don't try to confuse me with the facts, my mind is already made up.
http://www.flickr.com …6850267535/in/p​hotostream (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
wizard13
THREAD ­ STARTER
Goldmember
Avatar
1,169 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Apr 2006
Location: Western NY
     
Mar 28, 2011 18:00 |  #6

Thanks for the replies. I was wondering if there was a simple rule or formula to use. But guess not.
Thanks for the info!
Guess I just need to play more with the soft boxes and get to know the distances.


Photography = a constant learning process
Website (external link) || Facebook (external link) || Gear/Feedback

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Damian75
Goldmember
Avatar
1,623 posts
Likes: 4
Joined Dec 2006
Location: PA
     
Mar 28, 2011 18:14 |  #7

The power scale that Elinchrom uses is one of the thing I love about their strobes it makes mixing different watt strobes together so easy. As to the OP's ? if you want to know the F stop of your strobes at a certain power rating with a certain modifiers that is what they make light meters for, not trying to be a smart ass but a good light meter should be part of any strobe lighting kit.


Canon EOS 40D,30D, Canon 70-200 2.8L, 24-70 2.8L, 85 1.8, Canon extension tube, Elinchrom Lighting gear, 
Website (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sigma ­ pi
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
11,204 posts
Likes: 5
Joined Apr 2010
Location: Los Angeles
     
Mar 28, 2011 18:25 |  #8

wizard13 wrote in post #12111884 (external link)
Thanks for the replies. I was wondering if there was a simple rule or formula to use. But guess not.
Thanks for the info!
Guess I just need to play more with the soft boxes and get to know the distances.

I am not following completely here. No matter what i set up at power modifier or distance I just put it at f9 and fire and see what I get. If I am not being lazy I pull out the light meter.

Damian75 wrote in post #12111959 (external link)
The power scale that Elinchrom uses is one of the thing I love about their strobes it makes mixing different watt strobes together so easy. As to the OP's ? if you want to know the F stop of your strobes at a certain power rating with a certain modifiers that is what they make light meters for, not trying to be a smart ass but a good light meter should be part of any strobe lighting kit.

I love that too. It makes it easy. Light meter or eyeball it. It kind of sounds like he wants a sears set up where he turns on the strobes and measures how far from the subject so its good to go. If its not a permanent set up its hard to do this, and would get boring fast.


Don't try to confuse me with the facts, my mind is already made up.
http://www.flickr.com …6850267535/in/p​hotostream (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
wizard13
THREAD ­ STARTER
Goldmember
Avatar
1,169 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Apr 2006
Location: Western NY
     
Mar 28, 2011 21:20 |  #9

sigma pi wrote in post #12112010 (external link)
I am not following completely here. No matter what i set up at power modifier or distance I just put it at f9 and fire and see what I get. If I am not being lazy I pull out the light meter.


I love that too. It makes it easy. Light meter or eyeball it. It kind of sounds like he wants a sears set up where he turns on the strobes and measures how far from the subject so its good to go. If its not a permanent set up its hard to do this, and would get boring fast.

Not looking for a sears set-up but more a formula to help calculate the output. Guess a light meter is the next purchase.
Thanks for the replies-


Photography = a constant learning process
Website (external link) || Facebook (external link) || Gear/Feedback

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Csae
Goldmember
Avatar
3,350 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Nov 2008
Location: Montreal, Canada
     
Mar 28, 2011 23:39 |  #10

Well... it exists.

Inverse square law, strobe GN, modifier Light Loss.

Take a shot at 1 meter, with no reflector or softbox or anything. Meter it, f40?Cool. Add modifier, f32? Cool, note light loss down (on the modifier if you want). Then just apply inverse square law for distance to subject and calculate the light.

Rather complicated & not extremely scientific, someone will probably chime in with a better formula.

Its much much easier to meter, or chimp.


Feel free to call me Case.
CasePhoto.ca (external link) - FanPage (external link)
-Montreal based Photography.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
wizard13
THREAD ­ STARTER
Goldmember
Avatar
1,169 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Apr 2006
Location: Western NY
     
Mar 29, 2011 10:39 |  #11

Thanks for the reply!

Csae wrote in post #12113808 (external link)
Well... it exists.

Inverse square law, strobe GN, modifier Light Loss.

Take a shot at 1 meter, with no reflector or softbox or anything. Meter it, f40?Cool. Add modifier, f32? Cool, note light loss down (on the modifier if you want). Then just apply inverse square law for distance to subject and calculate the light.

Rather complicated & not extremely scientific, someone will probably chime in with a better formula.

Its much much easier to meter, or chimp.


Photography = a constant learning process
Website (external link) || Facebook (external link) || Gear/Feedback

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sigma ­ pi
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
11,204 posts
Likes: 5
Joined Apr 2010
Location: Los Angeles
     
Mar 29, 2011 11:24 |  #12

Csae wrote in post #12113808 (external link)
Its much much easier to meter, or chimp.

This. By the time I have the calculator out I could have chimped it :lol:


Don't try to confuse me with the facts, my mind is already made up.
http://www.flickr.com …6850267535/in/p​hotostream (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
ben_r_
-POTN's Three legged Support-
Avatar
15,893 posts
Likes: 13
Joined Nov 2007
Location: Sacramento, CA
     
Mar 29, 2011 15:12 |  #13

OP: Have you seen this thread? LINK


[Gear List | Flickr (external link) | My Reviews] /|\ Tripod Leg Protection (external link) /|\
GIVE a man a fish and he'll eat for a day. TEACH a man to fish and he'll eat for a lifetime.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
wizard13
THREAD ­ STARTER
Goldmember
Avatar
1,169 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Apr 2006
Location: Western NY
     
Mar 29, 2011 16:41 |  #14

ben_r_ wrote in post #12118361 (external link)
OP: Have you seen this thread? LINK

Thanks for the link!
That is perfect!


Photography = a constant learning process
Website (external link) || Facebook (external link) || Gear/Feedback

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
ben_r_
-POTN's Three legged Support-
Avatar
15,893 posts
Likes: 13
Joined Nov 2007
Location: Sacramento, CA
     
Mar 29, 2011 20:21 |  #15

wizard13 wrote in post #12119112 (external link)
Thanks for the link!
That is perfect!

Just found it today myself actually. Only minutes before I fell onto your thread. Thought that might shed some light on it. Glad that helped!


[Gear List | Flickr (external link) | My Reviews] /|\ Tripod Leg Protection (external link) /|\
GIVE a man a fish and he'll eat for a day. TEACH a man to fish and he'll eat for a lifetime.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

2,266 views & 0 likes for this thread
BXRi500's Readout
FORUMS General Gear Talk Flash and Studio Lighting 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is Jpcullen
916 guests, 287 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 15144, that happened on Nov 22, 2018

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.