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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 08 Apr 2011 (Friday) 02:38
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wide angle macro

 
amfoto1
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Apr 08, 2011 15:54 |  #16

If you want to shoot high magnifications, you are going to need some working room. A wide angle macro would generally put you way too close to the subject.

IMAGE: http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5023/5601543420_61d786650e_b.jpg
Callifornia poppies.
Canon EF 20mm f2.8 lens at f11 or f16, with 12mm macro extension tube.
EOS-3 Camera, shutter speed unrecorded. Handheld.
Kodak Ektachrome E100VS Slide film, scanned with Nikon EF4000.


I think this is the right shot... it's from some years ago and I had to dig in my archives for it. If it's the one I'm thinking of, it's considerably less than 1:1 magnification macro shot, but was made with a 20mm lens on a film camera, where it's a very wide lens (Film = full frame... On a crop camera a 12 or 13mm lens would give similar angle of view).

It's not a macro lens, so I added a 12mm macro extension tube behind the lens to allow it to focus closer. The petal of the flower was touching the front lens element! Any closer than this and it would have been impossible to focus. The goal of this shot was to better retain background detail in a macro shot, although it still goes pretty soft. Normally there would be even less detail.

Normally I use a 100mm macro lens, on both crop and full frame cameras. Another I use for handheld shooting is a compact 90mm. I also have a 180mm macro lens, but mostly use that on full frame. It's a bit long and difficult to work with on a crop sensor camera.

Out in the field I don't particularly like to work with shorter than 90 or 100mm macro lenses. A 50mm or shorter would put me right on top of my subject, where I might cast an unwanted shadow or scare away living critters.


There are exceptions... I use a 45mm Tilt Shift for near macro close-ups, on a crop sensor camea, for small product shots in studio. This is a different situation. I want to be close enough that I can reach out and rearrange the inanimate subject while keeping my eye to the viewfinder. And since I'm working with studio lighting I don't have any problems with unwanted shadows.

Following isn't macro, but was shot with Canon 100mm f2.8 USM macro lens...

IMAGE: http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5149/5601622244_5784e7a28c_b.jpg
Amaryllis or "belladonna lily".
EF 100mm f2.8 USM Macro lens. Aperture setting unrecorded.
EOS-3 camera. Shutter speed unrecorded.
Ektachrome E100VS film. Scanned with Nikon EF4000.


As a rule, when someone asks me about shooting macro I usually suggest a lens in the 90mm to 105mm range to learn with... That's just the easiest to use for all purpose close-up shooting and there are a number of good ones to choose among. There are some good 60mm and 70mm, too, but I wouldn't want to go much shorter for field work. If shooting full frame, then a 150mm or 180mm might be useful, but I generally don't recommend such a long lens with crop cameras.

Of course, for some "portraits" you want an even longer lens to have plenty of working distance from the subject, especially when it doesn't feel like having its picture taken...

IMAGE: http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5029/5601037665_0207e66381_b.jpg
California ebony tarantula.
EF 180mm f3.5L macro lens, aperture setting unrecorded.
EOS-3 camera, shutter speed setting unrecorded.
Ektachrome E100VS film, scanned with Nikon ED4000.


If your goal is unusually deep depth of field in macro shots, check out "focus stacking" at www.heliconsoftware.co​m (external link).

Alan Myers (external link) "Walk softly and carry a big lens."
5DII, 7DII(x2), 7D(x2) & other cameras. 10-22mm, Tokina 12-24/4, 20/2.8, TS 24/3.5L, 24-70/2.8L, 28/1.8, 28-135 IS (x2), TS 45/2.8, 50/1.4, Tamron 60/2.0, 70-200/4L IS, 70-200/2.8 IS, 85/1.8, Tamron 90/2.5 Macro, 100/2.8 USM, 100-400L II, 135/2L, 180/3.5L, 300/4L IS (x2), 300/2.8L IS, 500/4L IS, EF 1.4X II, EF 2X II. Flashes, studio strobes & various access. - FLICKR (external link) - ZENFOLIO (external link)

  
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tancanon58
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Apr 08, 2011 16:01 as a reply to  @ amfoto1's post |  #17

It is a Sigma 17-70 macro .


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TuanTime
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Apr 08, 2011 19:28 as a reply to  @ tancanon58's post |  #18

Best option for a wide angle macro is to just get a nice point and shoot that does macro. Like a G12 or something, it's pretty wide, does macro, and has huge DoF.




  
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plasticmotif
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Apr 08, 2011 21:39 |  #19

ZE 21.


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gasrocks
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Apr 09, 2011 00:43 |  #20

Sorry the world of macro is not just 1:1, most macro lenses do not even go to 1:1.


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sbattey
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Apr 09, 2011 02:12 |  #21
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Most certainly not suited for macro, but the sigma 10-20 3.5 can focus at like 9.5 inches. Super close.

Has a cool effect but wont help you get large photos of bugs.


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windpig
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Apr 09, 2011 08:05 |  #22

gasrocks wrote in post #12187654 (external link)
Sorry the world of macro is not just 1:1, most macro lenses do not even go to 1:1.

I guess it's how "macro" is defined as opposed to close up merely being "close up".


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plasticmotif
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Apr 09, 2011 08:44 |  #23

Zeiss 21 focuses to 8.75 inches.


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Josh13
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Apr 09, 2011 09:48 as a reply to  @ plasticmotif's post |  #24

Sigma 28mm f1.8 does a 1:3 macro and is on the less expensive side


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gasrocks
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Apr 09, 2011 13:17 |  #25

Definition of macro - an area, starts where the usual lens leaves off, about 1/8 life size and goes down to 2 times life size. Past that is another field. Most people are quite happy with 1/2 life size, IMO.


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SavageDigital
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Apr 09, 2011 15:09 as a reply to  @ gasrocks's post |  #26

The Tokina 10-17mm Fisheye has a 180 degree FOV and shoots 1:2.5 macro with a MFD of 1". Produces some interesting near-macro shots due to the field curvature...


-Randy Gear: Canon 5D MKIII, 6D & 7D, 70-200mm f2.8 IS II, 24-105mm L, 50mm STM - Sigma 85mm & 35mm f1.4 ART - Rokinon 8mm Fisheye

  
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kent ­ andersen
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Apr 10, 2011 17:12 |  #27

thanks for all these very good sugestions!!!

This was very helpful!!


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ZoneV
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Apr 12, 2011 04:09 |  #28

Some add a thicker washer between their lens mount and the lens itself. I think this is done sometimes with the shorter Samyang / Rokinon fisheys - but should work for most manual lenses very well. And with Canon EF lenses this could be done too. But warranty is lost with this operation.
For "longer" wideangles short extension tubes could be useful, I made a 8 mm thick manual extension tube.

Other way would be a realy lens system. First lens a (super) wideangle for e.g. 2/3" camera, and the inter-image is magnified with a second (relay) lens. This is the way most wideangle macros are made.

Another way would be the use of an borescope with wide angle field. But one has to take a better one with HD quality or such. That is more or less the same like the relay lens system and a "dark" f-stop.


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ceriltheblade
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Apr 12, 2011 04:20 |  #29

kent andersen wrote in post #12184573 (external link)
Thanks for the answers...

Yes, what I want is to take pictures of macros object (like bugs...) with an wide angle effect, and sharp background of leafs, sky, people etc...

The problem with Kenko tubes is the narrow DOF. And I want the eternal sharpnes and macro.

I gues there is no lens able to do that.

Gues I am left with PP to achieve that...

when you get into true macro photography the DOF is extraordinarily narrow - it has to do with the magnifcation. It does NOT have to do with the kenko tubes (or other extesion tubes from different companies). There was a discussion a couple of months ago (approx) in the macro discussion of using the wider focal lengths in at least a 1:1 ratio. Although according to your desire to have sky, people etc in your picture, I am not sure you mean that you want a 1:1 macro shot in and of itself - but maybe just a close up?


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kyleturbo
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Oct 23, 2011 14:04 |  #30

I have been looking for a wide angle close focusing lens as well. Not for shooting as small of things like bugs etc but to get the distorted look like you would get through a regular 24-70L but that can focus closer than 7inches.

A couple of you mentioned lenses that can focus as close as 8 or 9 inches. Thats kind of far actually...at least when you want wide angles.

for the 24mm tilt shift, I have used that lens a bunch, but forget how close you can get. I do remember it being closer than the 24-70. How close can you get?


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wide angle macro
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