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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
Thread started 07 May 2011 (Saturday) 06:47
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Grainy Photos

 
misstrapper
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May 07, 2011 06:47 |  #1

Hi, this is my first post on here or on any photography forum for that matter. I just do this for a hobby but have a lot of learning to do so I figured asking other photographers would be a great start.

I have a canon rebel xs and this past weekend I took photos at a church for my husbands nephews baptism. At the church the photos appeared to be coming out great but once I got home and downloaded them they all looked a bit graining. I had the ISO on 1600 and WB to tungsten light.

I'm very new to this camera so any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks
Holly


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gonzogolf
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May 07, 2011 07:05 |  #2

At ISO 1600 with an xs there will be some noise, which you call grain. Its more noticable and accentuated in shots that are a bit underexposed like the first shot you posted. You can reduce the effect with noise reduction software. If you have to use 1600 make sure you use your histogram to ensure you are nailing your exposure.




  
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yogestee
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May 07, 2011 07:34 as a reply to  @ gonzogolf's post |  #3

Also,, your shots look horribly out of focus. Did you try to sharpen them during post processing?


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Stump
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May 07, 2011 07:53 |  #4

I wanted to check out the exif, but it's missing from the photos. What was your shutter speed, what lens were you using?

The noise problem is like already posted, underexposed and iso1600 combined. But, more importantly why are they so out of focus?


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misstrapper
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May 07, 2011 13:41 as a reply to  @ Stump's post |  #5

Like I said I'm very new.

My shutter speed is 1/60 but I'm not sure how to use that yet and as far as focusing I just relied on the auto focus that camera has.

For photo editing I have photoshop cs5 but I've never worked in photoshop before and I'm finding it very overwhelming.




  
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Stump
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May 07, 2011 13:52 |  #6

misstrapper wrote in post #12365487 (external link)
Like I said I'm very new.

My shutter speed is 1/60 but I'm not sure how to use that yet and as far as focusing I just relied on the auto focus that camera has.

For photo editing I have photoshop cs5 but I've never worked in photoshop before and I'm finding it very overwhelming.

You won't really need to do a lot in photoshop starting out, so don't let it overwhelm you.

I would trying using center focus point. The camera doesn't always pick a good place to focus.


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mike_d
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May 07, 2011 14:09 |  #7

Those look like fluorescent lights above and a window in the background. 1/60' was good to capture a full cycle on the lights but tungsten was the wrong white balance. I would have just left it at auto. A flash bounced off the ceiling would have added much-needed light and let your use a lower (cleaner) ISO.




  
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Woodworker
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May 07, 2011 14:26 |  #8

Does this look any better? I've adjusted white balance and applied a little noise reduction but, at 1600 iso, I think some visible noise (grain) will be inevitable with your Rebel.

David


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sbattey
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May 07, 2011 15:24 |  #9
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ISO 1600 on the XS is pretty bad. You definitely need to do some noise reduction on the photos.


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atlrus
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May 08, 2011 10:11 |  #10

My take on the image. Although the issue here is that as others have said - you are out of focus. In the first pic, for example, the left arm of the guy with the candle is the one in focus, rather than the baby/parents. If everyone was in focus, it would be a piece of cake to fix the image, even at 1600ISO...Remember that you can remove noise, but at the expense of sharpness and vice versa.

P.S. Sorry for the small image, but POTN wouldn't let me attach anything over 150K


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misstrapper
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May 09, 2011 11:22 |  #11

Thank you for the feed back, I know I have a lot to learn. Step one, No ISO 1600! Step two, I need to focus myself and not trust the camera. Step three, learn a lot more about lighting.

I'm glad I have a place I can come to know when I'm having problems!

Thanks!




  
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BaghdadFred
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May 09, 2011 12:20 |  #12

Your under exposed, too slow of shutter speed and out of focus and DOF is too shallow. Auto Focus likely ended up using the guys arm as the focal point.

For this shot I would have probably set RAW, Manual, AWB, Shutter 1/125, F8.0, ISO600 and had my flash turned on. I would have also chosen single point AF pointed at the eye of your husband.


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IslandCrow
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May 09, 2011 15:08 |  #13

misstrapper wrote in post #12376025 (external link)
Thank you for the feed back, I know I have a lot to learn. Step one, No ISO 1600! Step two, I need to focus myself and not trust the camera. Step three, learn a lot more about lighting.

I'm glad I have a place I can come to know when I'm having problems!

Thanks!

I certainly wouldn't say "no ISO 1600". Use the ISO you need for the correct exposure. If it's 1600 (in this case it appears you needed at least that), use 1600. Most people can live with a noisy photo much more so than something that's underexposed or has a lot of motion blur.

As others have stated, the focus is a bigger issue. I'm guessing you're allowing the camera to pick the focus point (I think there's a specific term for that mode, but I can't remember). I don't believe the Rebel cameras have the nice little joystick (that's probably also not the correct term) on the back to allow you to select the exact focus point on the side, but even setting just the center focus point would be preferrable in most circumstances. Once you learn how to do that, it allows you to focus on the exact part of the scene you most need in focus. In portraiture, that's generally your primary subjects eyes (or closest eye if it's more of a profile shot). Especially in low light situations, you'll probably be using your largest aperture (i.e. smallest f-stop), which can give you a very small depth of field (i.e. the area of the photo that's in focus).




  
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Bang ­ Bang ­ Boy
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May 09, 2011 20:18 |  #14

I'd say buy an external flash or even use the pop up one(its pretty bad) to get a higher shutter speed and lower ISO. Less grain and no motion blur!

Some people here might seem rude and direct but I hope you enjoy this forum as much as I have, here is a boatload of information regarding just about anything between photography and ducks.

/Felix


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gkarris
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May 09, 2011 20:41 |  #15

1/60th is fine. Make sure your aperture is wide open, so you can decrease the ISO to 800 or lower and make sure your lens IS is on if you need to decrease the shutter speed....




  
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Grainy Photos
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