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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
Thread started 10 May 2011 (Tuesday) 01:25
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What is the 'true' sharpness of a lens

 
jwhittaker
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May 10, 2011 06:30 |  #16

Sdiver2489 wrote in post #12381396 (external link)
In the second test you stopped down to f13 at 15mm. Not only is that probably pointless, it will introduce some softness that may be bothering you. You appear to be using highlight tone priority because you used ISO200. You can disable this and access ISO100. Lastly, your shutter speed due to your aperture was only 1/30th a second. More than enough to hand hold but not enough to stop the motion of fluttering leaves.

Yeah, I was hoping to extend the depth of field by reducing fstop, so I would have more of a section in focus/sharp. I was thinking that wide open would confuse the issue as only a small bit would be in focus, but I'm not experienced enough to know if it would make a difference at the distances involved.


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Sdiver2489
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May 10, 2011 06:44 |  #17

jwhittaker wrote in post #12381423 (external link)
Yeah, I was hoping to extend the depth of field by reducing fstop, so I would have more of a section in focus/sharp. I was thinking that wide open would confuse the issue as only a small bit would be in focus, but I'm not experienced enough to know if it would make a difference at the distances involved.

http://www.dofmaster.c​om/dofjs.html (external link)

Pay attention to the hyperfocal distance. I like to play it a bit safe with this number but its a good guide. Basically if you had used F5.6 and focused about 10 ft away, everything from 4ft to infinity would be in focus. You can quickly see how for these focal lengths and subject distances, F13 is way overkill.

It took me messing up shutter speeds a few times to learn that, while a scene may look stationary, it really isn't. This is where IS can hurt you sometimes. Yes, you can hand hold at 15mm down to probably 1/2 a second or so...but leaves move rather quickly and that is likely to be the first thing you will lose detail in.


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jwhittaker
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May 10, 2011 06:48 |  #18

Sdiver2489 wrote in post #12381471 (external link)
http://www.dofmaster.c​om/dofjs.html (external link)

Pay attention to the hyperfocal distance. I like to play it a bit safe with this number but its a good guide. Basically if you had used F5.6 and focused about 10 ft away, everything from 4ft to infinity would be in focus. You can quickly see how for these focal lengths and subject distances, F13 is way overkill.

It took me messing up shutter speeds a few times to learn that, while a scene may look stationary, it really isn't. This is where IS can hurt you sometimes. Yes, you can hand hold at 15mm down to probably 1/2 a second or so...but leaves move rather quickly and that is likely to be the first thing you will lose detail in.

Thanks for all the advice, this forum is awesome.


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hollis_f
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May 10, 2011 06:49 |  #19

jwhittaker wrote in post #12381414 (external link)
Does that mean that the camera (not lens) introduces softness via it's onboard software? I read somewher about anti-aliasing but not sure what it means.

The camera has an anti-aliasing, or low-pass, filter in front of the sensor. This is required to prevent nasty artifacts and moire patterns in the final image. It does, however, blur the image slightly. Sharpening the image can improve the appearance of some of the blurred areas.


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May 10, 2011 06:49 |  #20

jwhittaker wrote in post #12381414 (external link)
Does that mean that the camera (not lens) introduces softness via it's onboard software? I read somewher about anti-aliasing but not sure what it means.

Yes, the capture has to be de-mosaiced, also there is the anti aliasing filter, which are different for different camera bodies.

My 40D and 7D require more sharpening than my 5DII, in fact it's real easy to over sharpen my 5DII images.

I use DPP a lot to cull out my shots. Default is set to 3, I feel I can go to 5 on a 40D or 5DII shot without feeling like I have an OOF shot. This is only a generalization.


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May 10, 2011 06:53 as a reply to  @ windpig's post |  #21

Have you ever considered one of these?
Its a good read.
http://www.canonrumors​.com …ica-m9-experience-review/ (external link)




  
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GoneTomorrow
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May 10, 2011 06:59 |  #22

jwhittaker wrote in post #12381414 (external link)
Does that mean that the camera (not lens) introduces softness via it's onboard software? I read somewher about anti-aliasing but not sure what it means.

Check the Picture Styles on your camera. There you will find the camera's setting for sharpness, contrast, and saturation. When I last had a Rebel, the sharpness was set to 0 out of the box.

These same three settings can be adjusted post-process if you shoot RAW. Otherwise, the settings are fixed with JPEG.


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jwhittaker
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May 10, 2011 07:15 |  #23

So if we take the actual image which lands on the sensor...
Does a sharpness of zero actually deliberately 'soften' the image - eg to be kind on wrinkly faces.
Does a sharpness of 7 actually make the image sharper than what lands on the sensor?
What is the setting for 'as is'? I guess its 3 or 4? - but maybe it's 7.
But I guess that's not imporant if shooting in RAW? It just ignores that sharpness setting and records exactly what it sees?


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Sdiver2489
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May 10, 2011 07:25 |  #24

jwhittaker wrote in post #12381598 (external link)
So if we take the actual image which lands on the sensor...
Does a sharpness of zero actually deliberately 'soften' the image - eg to be kind on wrinkly faces.
Does a sharpness of 7 actually make the image sharper than what lands on the sensor?
What is the setting for 'as is'? I guess its 3 or 4? - but maybe it's 7.
But I guess that's not imporant if shooting in RAW? It just ignores that sharpness setting and records exactly what it sees?

1. No
2. Yes
3. 0 would be the closest to the output of the sensor
4. Correct

You have to understand that there are softening effects due to the Camera's AA filter and noise reduction. Because of this, the image recorded is softer than it needs to be sometimes. This can be partially recovered by applying some sharpening to your image.

Don't overthink this one, if using JPG, just find the setting that works best for you, I personally find 3 or 4 are usually good.


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yogestee
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May 10, 2011 09:40 as a reply to  @ Sdiver2489's post |  #25

Lack of sharpness can be caused by a number of things, camera movement, subject movement, misfocus and lens optics.

The first two are due to user error, the third user error and/or equipment failure, the fourth also equipment failure.


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May 10, 2011 10:20 |  #26

Given your subjects, I don't see anything wrong with the lens based on those shots; I wouldn't fret about it and get out and shoot. A lot of the other commenters here have given some great pointers. Also, remember that these cameras need good contrast to focus on (a transition from black to white, for an extreme example) and it looks like you were focusing on some pretty flat, mono-colored subjects in these shots. That isn't going to give you great focus anyway

It takes time and experience; as you spend the first and gain the second you'll find your pics get sharper regardless of the lens :)


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What is the 'true' sharpness of a lens
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