Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS General Gear Talk Flash and Studio Lighting 
Thread started 10 May 2011 (Tuesday) 07:47
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

Set-up for formal prom pics-

 
wizard13
Goldmember
Avatar
1,169 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Apr 2006
Location: Western NY
     
May 10, 2011 07:47 |  #1

Doing a favor for a friend at a small high schools prom. Using a pair of BXRI500's as the main lights and a 580exII and 430ex for background lighting with gels for school colors. Have either 45" umbrellas (shoot through or reflective) or 25" soft boxes to use. Any suggestions which would work better for the formal poses of either a couple or individual?
Thanks in advance.


Photography = a constant learning process
Website (external link) || Facebook (external link) || Gear/Feedback

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
Echo63
Goldmember
Avatar
2,868 posts
Likes: 167
Joined Aug 2006
Location: Perth - Western Australia - Earth
     
May 10, 2011 10:42 |  #2

When I was shooting formal school prom pics, we used a pair of monoblocks on stands, with reflective brollies.
I think that may have been more for the simple setup, and it was what the hire kits came with than any other reason.
More importantly, tape the cables, and the edges of the backdrop down properly, you don't want to get sued if someone trips on a loose cable


My Best Imageswww.echo63.deviantart.​com (external link)
Gear listhttps://photography-on-the.net …p?p=2463426&pos​tcount=385

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
wizard13
THREAD ­ STARTER
Goldmember
Avatar
1,169 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Apr 2006
Location: Western NY
     
May 10, 2011 10:46 |  #3

Echo63 wrote in post #12382717 (external link)
When I was shooting formal school prom pics, we used a pair of monoblocks on stands, with reflective brollies.
I think that may have been more for the simple setup, and it was what the hire kits came with than any other reason.
More importantly, tape the cables, and the edges of the backdrop down properly, you don't want to get sued if someone trips on a loose cable

Thanks for the info. Was planning to tape all and will make sure now that you mentioned that.
Anything against soft boxes? Or just more the ease of set-up?


Photography = a constant learning process
Website (external link) || Facebook (external link) || Gear/Feedback

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Echo63
Goldmember
Avatar
2,868 posts
Likes: 167
Joined Aug 2006
Location: Perth - Western Australia - Earth
     
May 10, 2011 20:12 as a reply to  @ wizard13's post |  #4

I personally have nothing against soft boxes, you may find they work better.

When I Was shooting school balls it was for a fairly large photographic studio, about half the gear we used was his, and the other half was rental gear.
The Bowens or Elinchrom rental gear would always arrive packed in a bag with brollies.
Brollies are faster and easier to set up, and much cheaper to replace if they get damaged, I feel that these are the reasons we were using them, instead of any image/light quality concerns.

We basically set up a backdrop (normally a fabric one, occasionally a roll of seamless)
2 lights, high and at 45 degree angles, metered to about f8
Shooting was done with cameras in the 6mp range, 10d and 20d etc and 28-135 type lenses.


My Best Imageswww.echo63.deviantart.​com (external link)
Gear listhttps://photography-on-the.net …p?p=2463426&pos​tcount=385

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
wizard13
THREAD ­ STARTER
Goldmember
Avatar
1,169 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Apr 2006
Location: Western NY
     
May 10, 2011 21:09 |  #5

Thanks for the info. That is what I was thinking when you mentioned umbrellas. Appreciate the lighting set-up. That is exactly what I am planning on doing.

Echo63 wrote in post #12386218 (external link)
I personally have nothing against soft boxes, you may find they work better.

When I Was shooting school balls it was for a fairly large photographic studio, about half the gear we used was his, and the other half was rental gear.
The Bowens or Elinchrom rental gear would always arrive packed in a bag with brollies.
Brollies are faster and easier to set up, and much cheaper to replace if they get damaged, I feel that these are the reasons we were using them, instead of any image/light quality concerns.

We basically set up a backdrop (normally a fabric one, occasionally a roll of seamless)
2 lights, high and at 45 degree angles, metered to about f8
Shooting was done with cameras in the 6mp range, 10d and 20d etc and 28-135 type lenses.


Photography = a constant learning process
Website (external link) || Facebook (external link) || Gear/Feedback

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
RPCrowe
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
8,060 posts
Likes: 1196
Joined Nov 2005
Location: San Diego County, California, USA
     
May 11, 2011 09:56 as a reply to  @ wizard13's post |  #6

All tape is not created equal...

I have to admit that duct tape is one of my favorite materials but, it certainly has its limitations. One of the downsides of duct tape is the sticky residue which often remains after the tape is removed.

That is not the fault of the manufacturer because, duct tape is designed to tape up HVAC ducting and not to be removed.

When a photographer wants to tape his electrical cords or tape anything else in which the tape must be removed, Gaffer's Tape is the material to use because it doesn't leave residue like duct tape does and because it is stronger and more adhesive than masking tape.

Gaffer's Tape is more expensive but, it is the right tool for the job...

http://www.uline.com …OH05p6U4KgCFQkF​bAodvFWfHg (external link)


See my images at http://rpcrowe.smugmug​.com/ (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Echo63
Goldmember
Avatar
2,868 posts
Likes: 167
Joined Aug 2006
Location: Perth - Western Australia - Earth
     
May 11, 2011 10:47 |  #7

RPCrowe wrote in post #12389165 (external link)
I have to admit that duct tape is one of my favorite materials but, it certainly has its limitations. One of the downsides of duct tape is the sticky residue which often remains after the tape is removed.

That is not the fault of the manufacturer because, duct tape is designed to tape up HVAC ducting and not to be removed.

When a photographer wants to tape his electrical cords or tape anything else in which the tape must be removed, Gaffer's Tape is the material to use because it doesn't leave residue like duct tape does and because it is stronger and more adhesive than masking tape.

Gaffer's Tape is more expensive but, it is the right tool for the job...

http://www.uline.com …OH05p6U4KgCFQkF​bAodvFWfHg (external link)

Yep, we used to go through rolls and rolls of Nashua 357 gaffa tape
Best stuff ever, I used it and a few cable ties to bodge the alternator bracket in my car together to get me home, 9 Months later I finally got around to fixing it properly.

One of my "rules" is "if you can't fix it with gaffa tape and cable ties, it's an electrical problem"


My Best Imageswww.echo63.deviantart.​com (external link)
Gear listhttps://photography-on-the.net …p?p=2463426&pos​tcount=385

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
wizard13
THREAD ­ STARTER
Goldmember
Avatar
1,169 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Apr 2006
Location: Western NY
     
May 11, 2011 12:00 |  #8

Echo63 wrote in post #12389476 (external link)
Yep, we used to go through rolls and rolls of Nashua 357 gaffa tape
Best stuff ever, I used it and a few cable ties to bodge the alternator bracket in my car together to get me home, 9 Months later I finally got around to fixing it properly.

One of my "rules" is "if you can't fix it with gaffa tape and cable ties, it's an electrical problem"

Love to see how you would fix a lens that was cracked in half with gaffa tape! Since that is not electrical-


Photography = a constant learning process
Website (external link) || Facebook (external link) || Gear/Feedback

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

2,939 views & 0 likes for this thread
Set-up for formal prom pics-
FORUMS General Gear Talk Flash and Studio Lighting 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is gammy13
1949 guests, 234 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 15144, that happened on Nov 22, 2018

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.