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FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos The Business of Photography 
Thread started 16 Sep 2010 (Thursday) 01:37
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Shooting for my own architectural firm

 
photoguy6405
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May 11, 2011 14:52 |  #16

My opinion: They are not being unreasonable. In fact, they could be far more restrictive and claim your photography as moonlighting*. If you are taking shots on their time and dime, they have every reasonable expectation of ownership. Not unlike the designs you do for them as an architect.

Whatever you do on your own time and dime, is your business.

*- Some companies will do this, and I personally disagree with it (as long as their is no direct liability to the employer), but it is not illegal to have such a policy either.


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May 11, 2011 15:00 |  #17

photoguy6405 wrote in post #11218542 (external link)
Is that a horse?

LOL thats what i was thinking


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May 11, 2011 16:39 |  #18

If you work on their time, they own the images. Given you're supplying all the equipment that complicates things slightly. A rental fee would be appropriate. Perhaps there could be an agreement that if they resell the images for profit then you receive a 50% share.

If you're a full time employee and they pay you reasonably don't be too greedy. A solid job with a good firm is worthwhile.


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Architective
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May 11, 2011 16:48 as a reply to  @ photoguy6405's post |  #19

photoguy- I can't disagree with you about the ownership of photos taken on their time and dime being there. I'd be willing to relinquish the ownership of those if there was any kind of compensation given to me for the skills that I possess that nobody else here has. But I have paid for all of my own equipment, which is a big personal expense.

I'm not trying to get rich on the deal by any means. I like and value my job and don't want to jeopardize that. I just want to be fair.




  
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Simonthephotoman
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May 11, 2011 17:49 |  #20

My parents are architects and the photographer usually gets paid a flat rate of 2-3000$ a job which usually takes 3-4 days and they provide my parents with 4 sets of each image(8x10 or 4x5) for sending off to publication. I would say charge a flat rate for each job it makes things easier over the long term. Or have 3 different types(Small, Medium, Large)


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Park ­ Street
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May 11, 2011 20:49 |  #21

I would stop shooting for your firm if I were you. You are simply trying to wear too many hats there.

As far as pricing, most architectural photographers I know bid each job separately based on the number of shots, the rights granted, a creative fee, and expenses. I have a creative fee, which is like a day rate, charge a license for each image, have a post processing fee for each image and then add expenses. NO transfer to third parties is on everything given to the original client. I want to add as many parties to the original shoot as possible to bring down the expense cost. On images sold as stock after the shoot I always make them a higher cost than the shot price to the original client as they took the risk and should reap a lower rate than stock clients.

Look at the ASMP site - http://asmp.org/commis​sioning/overview.html (external link) for info on commissioning architectural photography. Both ASMP and AIA worked to establish these documents.


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May 12, 2011 00:10 as a reply to  @ Park Street's post |  #22

Park -

Really good advice, and an even better link to ASMP/AIA literature. The more I've thought about it, the more I feel like you are right about shooting for my own firm. I'm considering a twist on this. I am drafting a contract that I intend to show my boss that outlines the duties and expectation implied with my business being an independent contractor back to them; shooting buildings on my OWN time, or by taking personal days to shoot it. In it, I plan to outline the acknowledgement of their intellectual properties and some language that identifies the rights of their clients. I am proposing to be a contractor to them, offering my services on a case by case basis which I will give an estimate for. In the cases where I shoot their buildings, I will notify them if someone is interested in purchasing the pictures, or at least ask the permission of the client to sell them. One consideration of mine is giving them a "creative fee", small percentage as an incentive.

I'm going to take the time to research this and not just blast it out. I plan on talking to them about it, let them know my rates will be laughably low compared with what I'll be charging other interested parties, and give them the option. I won't be offended if they say no, and I will politely decline to photograph their buildings, and not be upset if they hire other photogs. It might actually be a hell of a lot easier in the long run to do this.

These are just rough thoughts though. Thanks to all for chiming in.




  
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PhotosGuy
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May 12, 2011 08:57 |  #23

shooting buildings on my OWN time, or by taking personal days to shoot it.

That works best for me. And early AM & late PM is better light & could be shot before/after work, too.

One consideration of mine is giving them a "creative fee", small percentage as an incentive.

I wouldn't go down that road!

let them know my rates will be laughably low compared with what I'll be charging other interested parties, and give them the option.

If everything is on your own time, then "Slightly lower" would be better than "laughably low." Obviously you've been providing better images than the freelancers they've used in the past, so why shouldn't you get as much as they did?


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May 12, 2011 15:21 as a reply to  @ PhotosGuy's post |  #24

Just found this thread, and find it especially intersting to me, as I too am an Architect and a photographer on the side.
I shoot wedding on the side though, not really architecture. (well, i shoot architecture but not for profit, my business is lifestyle and wedding photography.)
so there are some differences in what we do.

But the way i look at it is similar to Tim, they are already paying me a nice hourly rate for my creativity, etc. I just make sure i don't get screwed on hours.
And they obviously should pay you for travel, expenses, etc..

But really the only thing that seperates it from a lot of your regular architect duties is that you are using your own equipment.
So in my situation, I make them rent me a 5D mark II and the appropriate lenses for the job. so i'm not actually even using my own equipment really.

if i already owned a 5dII and a 17 ts-e, then i don't know what i would do tbh. i would feel like i'm getting taken advantage of.


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