Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos RAW, Post Processing & Printing 
Thread started 18 May 2011 (Wednesday) 08:11
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

Help - Need to remove reflection from car

 
Village_Idiot
GREATEST POTN MEMBER EVER
Avatar
3,695 posts
Likes: 18
Joined Jan 2007
Location: Durt Burg, WV
     
May 18, 2011 08:11 |  #1

This is the largest size flickr will let me upload. If you would like a larger size, I can mail it or figure out a way to get it to you.

I would like to be able to remove the reflect of the strip box from the fender. I didn't have a boom and the person holding the light was being a pain to direct, so this is what I ended up with. I'm pretty decent at cloning or copying and pasting then manually blending it in with dodge, burn, and smudge, but I figure there has to be an easier way.

So, does anyone have a way to fix the reflections that won't take me an hour of messing just to get an acceptable image. I want a good image. If you can do this, can you also include how it was done?

IMAGE NOT FOUND
IMAGE IS A REDIRECT OR MISSING!
HTTP response: NOT FOUND | MIME changed to 'image/gif' | Redirected to error image by FLICKR

My village called. I was told that they missed me.

Speedotron users, untie!

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
The ­ Shaheen
Senior Member
406 posts
Joined Nov 2007
Location: London
     
May 18, 2011 08:26 |  #2

[QUOTE=Village_Idiot;1​2432615]This is the largest size flickr will let me upload. If you would like a larger size, I can mail it or figure out a way to get it to you.

I would like to be able to remove the reflect of the strip box from the fender. I didn't have a book and the person holding the light was being a pain to direct, so this is what I ended up with. I'm pretty decent at cloning or copying and pasting then manually blending it in with dodge, burn, and smudge, but I figure there has to be an easier way.

So, does anyone have a way to fix the reflections that won't take me an hour of messing just to get an acceptable image. I want a good image. If you can do this, can you also include how it was done?


'Patch Tool' gently, and a tiny bit of cloning..


"Tt's not the Devil in the details, it's God!"
https://photography-on-the.net …p=11498080&post​count=2620

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
czynot
Member
198 posts
Joined Sep 2008
     
May 18, 2011 10:31 |  #3

stamp/clone it out or patch tool will do too.Easy to fix fender area but harder to fix headlight area. simple took 3mins. will look alot better if spend few more mins


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.


5D MKII, 24-70mm L, 18-55mm IS,70-200mm 2.8L IS, 50mm 1.8, 100mm Macro, 2-580EX

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Big ­ Apple ­ Photography
Wish I had a 5D Classic
Avatar
4,148 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Feb 2011
Location: Near a pot of gold
     
May 18, 2011 11:06 |  #4

Select the reflection with the patch tool press shift f5 (or go to edit>fill) and select content aware.... You should do it on small portions.... Then burn the area a little bit... Just circle shift f5 enter circle shift f5 enter until you get it... :)


Love POTN? Donate!
Feel like spending your money? Support POTN while doing that! Shop here! ;) (external link)TF IS BOORING...Undeserving of the TF's further attention, but sadly in need of a spell-check (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
kirkt
Cream of the Crop
6,171 posts
Gallery: 5 photos
Likes: 974
Joined Feb 2008
Location: Philadelphia, PA USA
     
May 18, 2011 11:14 |  #5

You may have more success with the clone tool if you switch to Lab as opposed to RGB and clone out the offending reflection in each channel. in this shot there are subtle gradients in tonality and color as the light tracks the body contours. If you examine the RGB channels, you can see this - trying to clone around this subtlety can often lead to glaring evidence of cloning. Compare the relative uniformity of the areas in the Lab channels surrounding the reflections and you will get the idea that trying to clone these channels may lead to a better result.

I cloned out the lowest reflection on the fender/wheel arch area using the Lab approach - took about 30 seconds. I did not use any area selections, etc. to limit the clone to the offending area, something that might improve the clone so it does not intrude into the break in the sheet metal on the fender, and potentially disrupt that line.

Kirk

IMAGE: http://kirkt.smugmug.com/Photography/Photo-of-the-Day/i-wRVC6Z9/0/X3/diagram-X3.jpg

IMAGE: http://kirkt.smugmug.com/Photography/Photo-of-the-Day/i-LWGMHg6/0/X3/car-ed-X3.jpg

Kirk
---
images: http://kirkt.smugmug.c​om (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
tvphotog
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
6,093 posts
Gallery: 1 photo
Likes: 37
Joined Aug 2007
Location: New York City
     
May 18, 2011 11:19 |  #6

To my eye, I like the reflection as it gives the feeling of a shiny finish. Removing it makes the car look dull.

The above suggestions are fine if you want to remove it. If it's in RAW, you can use the exposure brush to reduce it just a bit if you want to reduce the glare.


Jay
Ireland in Word and Image (external link) Jay Ben Images (external link)5D IV | 5DS/R | Powershot S100 | 24-105L | 100-400 IIL | 16-35 f/2.8 IIL | 24 T/S f /3.5L II | 17 T/S f/4L | 50mm f/1.2L | 35mm f/1.4L | 70-200 f/2.8L II | 580 EX II | 600 EX-RT | Feisol 3441T/Markins Q3T lever QR | Gitzo 3542L Markins Qi20 BV-22 | Gitzo 5561T RRS MH-02

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Dustman
Senior Member
Avatar
868 posts
Likes: 21
Joined Mar 2010
Location: New Jersey
     
May 18, 2011 11:58 |  #7

tvphotog wrote in post #12433681 (external link)
To my eye, I like the reflection as it gives the feeling of a shiny finish. Removing it makes the car look dull.

The above suggestions are fine if you want to remove it. If it's in RAW, you can use the exposure brush to reduce it just a bit if you want to reduce the glare.

+1

I too prefer the reflections on the car in your shot, I personally fell it will loose something if you remove it from the image. I do not find them distracting at all. Nice Shot!


www.DustinLevine.com (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
svtdude
Member
Avatar
34 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Feb 2010
Location: Des Moines, Iowa
     
May 18, 2011 12:05 |  #8

same here keep the reflection, nice shot




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Village_Idiot
THREAD ­ STARTER
GREATEST POTN MEMBER EVER
Avatar
3,695 posts
Likes: 18
Joined Jan 2007
Location: Durt Burg, WV
     
May 18, 2011 12:28 |  #9

kirkt wrote in post #12433653 (external link)
You may have more success with the clone tool if you switch to Lab as opposed to RGB and clone out the offending reflection in each channel. in this shot there are subtle gradients in tonality and color as the light tracks the body contours. If you examine the RGB channels, you can see this - trying to clone around this subtlety can often lead to glaring evidence of cloning. Compare the relative uniformity of the areas in the Lab channels surrounding the reflections and you will get the idea that trying to clone these channels may lead to a better result.

I cloned out the lowest reflection on the fender/wheel arch area using the Lab approach - took about 30 seconds. I did not use any area selections, etc. to limit the clone to the offending area, something that might improve the clone so it does not intrude into the break in the sheet metal on the fender, and potentially disrupt that line.

Kirk


That's great. Are there any specific tutorials for this method? I've never even heard about it until just now.

tvphotog wrote in post #12433681 (external link)
To my eye, I like the reflection as it gives the feeling of a shiny finish. Removing it makes the car look dull.

The above suggestions are fine if you want to remove it. If it's in RAW, you can use the exposure brush to reduce it just a bit if you want to reduce the glare.

If anything, the two bottom ones have to go. The contour looks bad and I don't like how the top one isn't hugging the body line. If it was, then I'd be all for it, but I didn't have a good means of positioning the light and not a lot of time, so I ended up with what you see above.


My village called. I was told that they missed me.

Speedotron users, untie!

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

3,626 views & 0 likes for this thread
Help - Need to remove reflection from car
FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos RAW, Post Processing & Printing 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is aggrey12
1304 guests, 241 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 15144, that happened on Nov 22, 2018

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.