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FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Astronomy & Celestial 
Thread started 22 Jun 2010 (Tuesday) 11:36
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Starry Sky at ISO 3200 - What could be done to make this picture better?

 
Jon-Luke
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May 21, 2011 05:13 as a reply to  @ post 12434978 |  #31

I agree that more color would be good! But IMHO more color with less noise... Would this have been easier to achieve by "Stacking" as DutchVince suggests... Also does anyone have a method for doing stacking, my worry would be that it would be difficult to achieve proper stacking without getting a star trail effect especially if you want horizon in the picture (Is this correct or is there a way of avoiding the problem?)


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Jon-Luke
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May 21, 2011 05:25 |  #32

ameerat42 wrote in post #10422980 (external link)
Hey! You still there, Jon-Luk?
I looked at your exif for the shot and here's a bit of it...

Lens: 10-20mm
Focal Length: 10.0mm
Aperture: f/3.5
Exposure Time: 30.000 s
ISO equiv: 3200
Title: Milkyway Hobatere

I didn't read the above tirades in detail, but high ISO aside, you need Light Gathering Power and Resolving Power for good images of the stars.

That means you want as much good glass as you can get on the front of your camera. Now, you used a 10mm effective focal length at f/3.5. That makes an actual aperture of about 3mm. In my old 35mm film cameras, I have always aimed at a "good inch" of open glass as my aperture for such shots. Typically, I used a 50mm lens at its widest stop of f/1.7. That made the aperture about 29mm, just over an inch. (Once I used an f/1.2 version of the same brand lens with disastrous little comets for stars anywhere away from the very centre of the image.) I'd use ISO 400 film and track the sky with the camera fixed on an equatorial mount. Typically 30-60 sec exposures.

Sure, ISO is important, and some of the above discourse is relevant, but for "good to start with images", get some good glass.
Cheers. Am.


Thanks for the message - Quite a difficult decision balancing wide angle with wide aperture, I wanted to be as wide as possible to show the magnificent sweep of the milky-way in the southern hemisphere - but as you say its better to be able to have an aperture that is wider. I also have a 30mm ƒ1.4 lens which I will try some shots on, unfortunately my camera has a cropped sensor, so the 30mm effectively gives almost the same image as a 50mm. But thanks for the advice.


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waassaabee
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May 21, 2011 08:42 |  #33

Jon-Luke wrote in post #10406901 (external link)
This is my first attempt at photographing the heavens. The intention was to photograph the Milky Way without start trails. Using the camera's LCD viewfinder and a bit of trial and error I seemed to get the best results with ISO 3200 the aperture wide open at ƒ3.5 and the shutter set to 30 sec.

I was using a 7D and a Sigma 10-20mm lens set at 10mm. (Photograph was taken in Namibia close to Etosha - so Milky Way in the Southern Hemisphere).

Any suggestions would be appreciated

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You have some good data here, but IMHO the color balance is way off. Way to much blue here, though it does produce a interesting image.

All the techno babble makes my head hurt.-?


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rclester
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May 21, 2011 11:02 |  #34

Jon-Luke wrote in post #12451321 (external link)
I agree that more color would be good! But IMHO more color with less noise... Would this have been easier to achieve by "Stacking" as DutchVince suggests... Also does anyone have a method for doing stacking, my worry would be that it would be difficult to achieve proper stacking without getting a star trail effect especially if you want horizon in the picture (Is this correct or is there a way of avoiding the problem?)

waassaabee wrote in post #12451720 (external link)
You have some good data here, but IMHO the color balance is way off. Way to much blue here, though it does produce a interesting image.

In my edit, I first ran it thru a program to add more detail. This also gave me more color and separated the foreground just a bit. But it added quite a bit of noise. I ran it thru a program to reduce the noise (but only a little bit because this also started to get rid of some of the stars). I agree that it has too much noise. I know waassaabee won't like my edit because he thinks the original has too much blue in it. That's just a matter of taste. Realism vs. Interpretation. That's up to the viewer.

As for the stacking of images, I have the same question that you have. It seems that this would surely cause the stars to trail. I'm interested in having someone discuss that. The only photo I've taken with stars in it is this one https://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthre​ad.php?t=710617. I'm really interested in doing more of this type of photography, so I'm looking at lot of different threads in this fouum to get tips and ideas. This guy http://twilightscapes.​com/ (external link) posts to this forum quite often and really does some nice work.

I really like your picture. Keep working on it. That's what I'm going to do.


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David ­ Ransley
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May 21, 2011 15:07 |  #35

Stacking images with the option to align the stars causes zero trailing. With a visible foreground, the forground will become smudged. If you serach the Internet, it is possible to find examples where people built a composite. The foreground and stars come from seperate images, or only capture the stars and stack them. If you don't align the stars, the long trails will show up.


DRH

  
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Celestron
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May 21, 2011 16:32 |  #36

i just wonder how many pages of info is needed to continue of how to make this image better . there is a max that can be done and i think the answer is on the first page . Give it a rest please .....




  
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Footbag
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May 22, 2011 16:45 |  #37

Nice image!

You should definitely download Deep Sky Stacker. Then you can take a series of dark frames at the same iso, exposure and temperature {with the lens cap on} that your image was taken and remove the noise that way.

I'm not sure if you took a series of exposures with the same settings. If you did then stacking the images will definitely remove some of the noise. But whether you did or didn't, you can still shoot some darks at any time. As long as the temperature is right.


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Celestron
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May 22, 2011 22:17 |  #38

Footbag wrote in post #12458655 (external link)
Nice image!

But whether you did or didn't, you can still shoot some darks at any time. As long as the temperature is right.


I've done that and it did not work . Darks and Flats must be during the same time as the original image .




  
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Footbag
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May 23, 2011 07:40 |  #39

Celestron wrote in post #12460318 (external link)
I've done that and it did not work . Darks and Flats must be during the same time as the original image .

Flats must be taken using the same image/optical train as the lights without rotating the camera. Even bumping the camera can mess this up.

Darks can be taken at anytime, anywhere. I've assembled a dark library, some of my darks were taken in the refrigerator, some in the freezer, some in a cooler. Some on the telescope. There is no difference. Just temperature match them. I use a program called Dark Library to select darks that match up with my lights.


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Starry Sky at ISO 3200 - What could be done to make this picture better?
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