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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 02 Jun 2011 (Thursday) 13:15
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question re 100mm or 60 mm macro lens

 
inaflash
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Jun 02, 2011 13:15 |  #1

hi all....

i am looking to purchase a macro lens for close up use at weddings and other stuff...i'm not quite sure if i should get the 60 mil or 100 mil macro as i have never owned a macro before...any suggestions would be great!


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inaflash
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Jun 02, 2011 13:20 |  #2

question re 100mm or 60 mm macro lens

hi all....

i am looking to purchase a macro lens for close up use at weddings, ring shots that type of thing.. and other stuff...i'm not quite sure if i should get the 60 mil or 100 mil macro as i have never owned a macro before...any suggestions would be great!


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xtrematrix
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Jun 02, 2011 13:20 |  #3

I'd suggest the 60 for a cropped body and a 100 for a full frame.




  
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tkbslc
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Jun 02, 2011 13:23 |  #4

For macro use, the only real difference is the working distance, You'll be about 50% farther away with the 100m, which is usually desirable.

For non-macro, just pick based on the focal length. 60mm makes a great portrait length.


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amfoto1
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Jun 02, 2011 14:08 |  #5

It depends a lot on what camera you have...

If it's a crop sensor Canon model, then the 60mm can be used, if you wish. But it's an EF-S lens, so not usable on a full frame camera. Personally I'd find it a little short even on crop, for macro shooting I prefer a little more working distance.

If you shoot with a full frame model, then the 100mm might be a better choice. But it also works quite well on crop sensor... For mild magnifications you need more working distance, though.

Frankly if you only have occasional close-up/macro needs (most wedding shots I can think of - cake, rings, centerpieces, etc. - aren't anywhere near 1:1 macro magnification)....

The standard zooms 24-70, 24-105 and 28-135 are all quite close focusing, plus can be used with macro extension tubes to get a bit closer if needed. Many short prime teles and 70-200s also work pretty darned well with macro extension tubes. I recommend the Kenko DG tube set as the best value, about $160 US.

Another alternative is a diopter lens... These screw into the front of lenses to make them closer focusing. There are cheap ones that would be best avoided. The best ones are compound (two or more element) lenses. Canon and Nikon offer quality ones that usually work best with moderate tele primes... Canon's are 250D and 500D.

If a macro lens still seems to make sense, there are more good options:

- Canon EF-S 60mm f2.8 (Crop sensor only.)
- Tamron SP 60mm f2 macro (Crop only, note the f2 aperture might be nice for portraits).
- Sigma 70mm f2.8 macro (Full frame and crop, note this is not an HSM lens)
- Tamron SP 90mm f2.8 macro (FF and crop)
- Canon EF 100mm f2.8 USM (FF & crop. non-IS model, excellent image quality tho)
- Canon EF 100mm f2.8 L IS (FF & crop. Latest L/IS model, excellent images, higher priced)
- Tokina 100mm f2.8 (FF & crop.)
- Sigma 105mm f2.8 (FF & crop. Not an HSM lens.)

I do not recommend shorter or longer focal lengths for your purposes. Shorter ones might put you too close to the subject. Longer focal lengths are more difficult to handhold (though Sigma is coming out with a 150/2.8 with OS that might be interesting), plus might call for too much working distance to be practical in your shooting situations.

Also not recommending the Canon MP-E 65mm, which is a very cool, very high magnification macro lens, manual focus only. It's a 1:1 to 5:1 lens... so life size to 5X life size... great for portraits of fruit flies and such.

The Canon TS-E lenses are another possibility... Both the 45mm and 90mm are quite close focusing.... and they can be used with macro extension rings. These are manual focus lenses, but the ability to finely control plane of focus, and to make perspective corrected shots of tall buildings like churches, interiors as well as exteriors, might make them an interesting option. The 45mm might be most useful for close-ups on crop cameras, the 90mm on full frame. But for shots of buildings or portraits this selection might not hold true (even the 24mm or 17mm versions might be desirable).


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plasticmotif
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Jun 02, 2011 14:13 |  #6

You need working distance if you'll be shooting moving subjects like bugs, I'd recommend either Canon 100 for Sigma 150 for this.

If not any true macro lens will work. Lots of lenses will get you close to macro anyway.

If you're on a crop sensored camera, I'd recommend the 60, it doubles as a nice portrait lens. The 100 would be a little long on crop for general use.


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tkbslc
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Jun 02, 2011 14:27 |  #7

plasticmotif wrote in post #12523588 (external link)
You need working distance if you'll be shooting moving subjects like bugs, I'd recommend either Canon 100 for Sigma 150 for this.

People always say this, but in reality, the working distance difference is 4 vs 6 inches. What kind of bugs are going to get scared at 4 inches that wouldn't at 6? Same logic if you are afraid of getting stung.


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inaflash
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Jun 02, 2011 15:05 |  #8

oops, i should have mentioned will be on a full frame, canon 5d mrk 2


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tkbslc
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Jun 02, 2011 15:06 |  #9

inaflash wrote in post #12523850 (external link)
oops, i should have mentioned will be on a full frame, canon 5d mrk 2

That makes it easier. The 60mm won't even mount on the 5D because it is an EF-S lens.


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inaflash
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Jun 02, 2011 15:10 |  #10

great information, thanks for it...

dave


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plasticmotif
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Jun 02, 2011 15:31 |  #11

It's 3.5" vs 6" that's a big difference. ESPECIALLY in moving your flash around.


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TheBigDog
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Jun 02, 2011 15:35 as a reply to  @ inaflash's post |  #12

Which body are you planning to use these on? The 60mm is an EFS lens so that knocks out the 1d/5d's...

I have used the 100mm non-L and currently own the L, both are top notch in terms of quality and sharpness (haven't used the 60mm). Just one's twice the price but comes with IS and weather sealing.


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tkbslc
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Jun 02, 2011 15:38 |  #13

plasticmotif wrote in post #12524018 (external link)
It's 3.5" vs 6" that's a big difference. ESPECIALLY in moving your flash around.

Yes it is, as a percentage. I was just saying 6" still isn't very far away, so it's not like you are going to be sneaky with either lens (or be safe to shoot scorpions!)

(The 4" I said earlier must be for the Tamron 60mm, sorry)


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aboss3
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Jun 02, 2011 16:28 |  #14
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I'd suggest 60 for crop and 100mm for FF. But you can get away with 24-70 pretty much 99% of the time


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plasticmotif
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Jun 02, 2011 16:56 |  #15

tkbslc wrote in post #12524061 (external link)
Yes it is, as a percentage. I was just saying 6" still isn't very far away, so it's not like you are going to be sneaky with either lens (or be safe to shoot scorpions!)

(The 4" I said earlier must be for the Tamron 60mm, sorry)

I take it you don't shoot bugs much.

It's not so much about scaring them as bumping into other things around them, getting the flash in a good position and actual easy of finding the critter.


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question re 100mm or 60 mm macro lens
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