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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Glamour & Nude Talk 
Thread started 03 Dec 2010 (Friday) 02:19
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How the heck do I use my 2nd light?

 
RickRandhawa
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Dec 03, 2010 02:19 |  #1

Most everything I've done has been with one light. Here's a link to my latest work:
https://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthre​ad.php?t=966413

The reason I only use one light is because I've been scared to use it since Im not sure what to do with it? I have a 2nd light+reflector+20/30 degree grids that I would like to use it for indoor rim lighting but have some questions.

1. Where do u set the rim light in relation to the main light? (example: 1 stop below main light, etc)
2. Where exactly do you aim the main light for a 2/3rd body shot? (Shoulder? Lower back?)
3. Anything else I should know about actual rim light placement for indoor work?

Thanks!


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sc0rp
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Dec 03, 2010 04:53 |  #2

I can't offer majorly helpful advice but hey:

1. Well your locked into the 2:1 ratio of the ranger so keep in mind that your main is always going to twice as powerful as the rim.

If you need to increase the power you can use a high performance reflector or just move the lights closer.

Less power, move it further back, gel it or use a less efficient modifier.

You set the rim light to where ever you want the light to be coming from to get the effect you want. Directly overhead on a boom works well if you have access to one.

2. Again depends on what type of lighting and effect you would like. I tend to aim the modifier towards the head pointing down so the light fall's off around the legs / feet if I'm using a smaller modifier. A larger modifier works well pointing straight on or feathered off to the side.

3. Experiment? Just play around and see what works and what doesn't for you. Another option is look at other peoples photos, work out how they did it and try it for yourself.




  
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sspellman
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Dec 03, 2010 14:16 |  #3

The most common placement for a rim light is to aim it at the back of the head from one side off camera. You dont have to really worry about light proportions with the rim, just if the effect is strong or weak. Focus on where the light hits the model and keeping the stand out of frame. Using a grid will keep the light mostly hitting the head/shoulders. I prefer to use a strip style softbox to get more light on the whole side of the model.

The rim light effect can be done with the careful placement of the sun behind the head of the model too, which could be what you did in pic #2.

-Scott


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woodsters
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Dec 03, 2010 14:32 |  #4

Those photos look great with just the one light!


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skyy38
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Dec 03, 2010 18:33 |  #5
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josh5k
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Dec 21, 2010 05:55 |  #6

Honestly if those are the kind of pictures you are taking with one light the second light is going to be a un-needed hassle :-)

But you can always use it to light specific areas esp with a grid and snoot on to control the flow of the light. Use it as your hair light later in the evening when the sun isn't over powering you and so on.


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fraiseap
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Dec 22, 2010 06:26 as a reply to  @ josh5k's post |  #7

I agree that the shots posted are very well lit. However the question was about using a second light indoors. The posted shots are outdoor with flash and reflector. What you need to do for indoor shots initially is replicate the lighting setup you had, thinking about the sun as one of those lights.

You are using the flash as the key light, the sun as rim and the reflector as fill. For indoors you can replicate this a couple of ways

1 use your main flash as key (same position as for the outdoor shots), use the second light behind the model in the same position as the sun in the outdoor shots, and use the reflector as you always do

2 forget rim light and use key and fill only. Key light in normal position and fill quite close to the camera. You won't get the separation from the background this way but if the background is light colored that will be OK.


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peter.storm
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Dec 23, 2010 11:36 |  #8

Really excellent photos.
peter.




  
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DavidAzilPhoto
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Feb 10, 2011 15:24 |  #9

your photos are great without the 2nd light




  
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imjasonbassett
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May 31, 2011 03:01 as a reply to  @ DavidAzilPhoto's post |  #10

For one, you are not using one light. You are using 2. The sun is another "light source" you have to consider position. So with that in mind, treat your second light like the sun. Fill if you need it, or hair and rim light if you need it.

The biggest hurdle with lighting is understand what it does and how to use it. Your photographs could use a bit more depth, so how about using that one light for harsh shadows, and the other for some fill. Just a suggestion. Remember.. my style is probably different than yours :)


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Peacefield
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Jun 21, 2011 14:27 |  #11

Everyone in your pic post selected images 1 and 3 but I rather like #2. And in it, the sun WAS your second or rim light. Very nice work.


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jeppoy
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Jun 21, 2011 14:34 |  #12

For outdoor shots, I find myself using 1 light enough with a ranger quadra and the 39" deep octa. I tried using hair light but it was more of a hassle so all the outdoor shoots I've done is one light setup.


No I'm not a photographer, I just shoot with Canon DSLR with those lenses with red thingy...;)

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The ­ Loft ­ Studios
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Jun 21, 2011 20:38 |  #13

RickRandhawa wrote in post #11387065 (external link)
Most everything I've done has been with one light. Here's a link to my latest work:
https://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthre​ad.php?t=966413

The reason I only use one light is because I've been scared to use it since Im not sure what to do with it? I have a 2nd light+reflector+20/30 degree grids that I would like to use it for indoor rim lighting but have some questions.

1. Where do u set the rim light in relation to the main light? (example: 1 stop below main light, etc)
2. Where exactly do you aim the main light for a 2/3rd body shot? (Shoulder? Lower back?)
3. Anything else I should know about actual rim light placement for indoor work?

Thanks!

Hi Rick,
The best answer to all of your questions can only come from you. And I'm very serious about this, this is not a "smart-alec" answer. Different people like their rim lights set at different powers and coming from different angles. If I were you, I would do a simple test with a wife, girlfriend, sister, neighbor, whom ever...... I would start off with a main light in "Butterfly Lighting Position" and do a rim light at a 45 degree angle behind the model and do a test at 1-stop below main exposure, then match the main exposure, then one stop above. When posing the model, make sure she is angled to the left on some shots, then to the right on some. This is so that you can see how the light will affect the backside of her (hair, back, legs, butt, etc...) and how it will affect the front side of her (light spilling onto her face and nose, chest, mid-section, etc...). The slowly bring the light around (in a circular pattern) where is more at a 20-something or 30-something degree angle to the model, but still behind her, angle wise. Then do this whole exercise all over again. Now, do the same to the opposite side of her and repeat the above steps.....

Now, place the main light at a 45 degree angle to the model (where there is a shadow to the opposite side of her..... whether or not you choose to fill in the shadows or not is up to you). Then using the rim light, follow the above steps to where the rim light is at a 45 degree angle on the shadow side of the model (opposite of the main) at different power settings, then to the opposite side of the model (same side as your main light). And test once again.....

Pull up all of your images in photoshop, then determine for yourself, what is the best lighting scheme for "Rick" and his preference..... You'll be surprised how your vision will be different from others..... Best of Luck to you!


MARK

  
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How the heck do I use my 2nd light?
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