Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Critique Corner 
Thread started 24 Jun 2011 (Friday) 00:15
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

What did I miss with this shot?

 
at7815
Member
67 posts
Joined Jan 2010
     
Jun 24, 2011 00:15 |  #1

Hi,

I am a total noob and this is one of the first pictures I've taken with my new DSLR (a T2i). I like the shot but it's just not crisp. It was shot handheld and I hope the Exif is embedded in the picture. I use iPhoto and did not additional PP to this photo. I'd appreciate any feedback on how to improve - I know I've got ways to go. Thanks.[URL=http://ima​geshack.us/photo/my-images/30/critiquetw.j​pg/]

IMAGE: http://img30.imageshack.us/img30/4240/critiquetw.jpg
[/URL



  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
PerfectTan
Senior Member
Avatar
440 posts
Joined Aug 2010
Location: Washington
     
Jun 24, 2011 00:24 |  #2

yes, you are a noob :) What is your main focus in this picture? The bikes or the man, or the parking lot in the background? Basically, too busy.


My Gear: Do you really want to know?

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
bboehm
Senior Member
706 posts
Joined Mar 2007
Location: Chicago, IL
     
Jun 24, 2011 00:31 |  #3

Two things that would improve this shot immensely:

1. Pick a subject and really focus in on just that subject. There's so much going on with this picture that I can't really tell what you intended to be the primary subject

2. You're on the right track with Aperture Priority (I shoot 99% of my pics in AP), but with a shot like this, I would shoot as wide open as you can (lowest f number) so that you blur out your background and only your subject is in sharp focus.

You're doing the right thing by taking shots and asking for advice because it's the best way to learn. Have fun with your new camera!!


7D, 50D, EFS 17-85mm IS, 24-70mm f/2.8L, 50mm f/1.2L, 70-200 f/2.8L IS II, 2X Extender III, Calumet Genesis 400, Speedlite 430EX, Pocket Wizards

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
DrFil
Senior Member
Avatar
510 posts
Joined May 2008
Location: Los Angeles
     
Jun 24, 2011 03:15 |  #4

this picture is not "crisp"? what does that even mean? before you start worrying about the crisp-ness of your photos, you need to work on composition. why is this picture bad? because it's busy, there's no main focus, nothing is particularly interesting, tons of random crap is in focus, etc. i would recommend looking at other people's pictures that you like and trying to think about what makes them appealing. and then go out and try to replicate those same principles. hell, even replicate the same pictures. good luck.

p.s. have you read ben's newbie guide yet? if not, that's the first thing you should do. https://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthre​ad.php?t=414088




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
jerefish
Goldmember
Avatar
1,003 posts
Likes: 2
Joined Feb 2011
Location: Canton, MI
     
Jun 24, 2011 08:31 |  #5

Also, I'm guessing you are using the kit lens...that should be thrown out. They are never any good...well maybe on the rare occasion, but I really hate mine at least. I did use it for fireworks pictures though, but to focus on a subject you need a better lens. I would start looking at other's photos on here and try to figure out what makes it a good picture. That will help you to get the camera-person's eye. Don’t be afraid to copy others work to start out, you will then figure out what you like! From there you will start taking pictures that you have every desire to print!


Jeremy or jfish works
Canon 7d | 70-200 F/4 L
| 28-70mm f/2.8 L
Flickr (external link) | Website (external link) | Julianne Grace 365

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
at7815
THREAD ­ STARTER
Member
67 posts
Joined Jan 2010
     
Jun 24, 2011 08:34 as a reply to  @ jerefish's post |  #6

Thank you, all! The focus was supposed to be the man but that's clearly not how it turned out. I have read ben's newbie guide but will give it another read. I really appreciate the feedback. Off to getting more practice!




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
pelooyen
Goldmember
Avatar
2,940 posts
Likes: 84
Joined Mar 2010
Location: Sydney
     
Jun 24, 2011 23:23 |  #7

I would HIGHLY recommend Bryan Peterson's book "Understanding Exposure" which is a great first book for newbies.


cheers, Paul
---------------
Flickr (external link) | My Website (external link) | Like me on Facebook (external link)
6D | 5Dc | 17-40mm L | 28-135mm IS USM | 70-200L f4 | 100mm f2.8 macro USM | MPE65 | MT-24EX | 580EX | Kenko extension tubes | 1.4x TC
| couple of umbrellas and softbox and other lighting stuff

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Aperture1.4
Member
184 posts
Joined May 2011
     
Jun 24, 2011 23:39 |  #8

Do you work for google street view?


I am dealing with apple autocorrect. Excuse my spelling/random words.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
shaftmaster
Goldmember
Avatar
1,429 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Nov 2008
Location: above 5000 feet
     
Jun 24, 2011 23:48 |  #9

Did you select the focus point or did you let the camera select it for you?

The EXIF data shows a shutter speed of 1/60, aperture f/16, and focal length of 50mm. I think 1/60 is too slow for a 50mm lens on a crop body and hand held, especially for shots of people that can be moving slightly. You'd get a more crisp shot at f/8 and 1/250 or f/5.6 and 1/500.


Paul

Gear -- Flickr (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
pelooyen
Goldmember
Avatar
2,940 posts
Likes: 84
Joined Mar 2010
Location: Sydney
     
Jun 25, 2011 00:23 |  #10

Another thing that needs mentioning
The photo has two extreme lighting conditions - The bike is over exposed, evidenced by the blown details. The exposure setting was still not enough to adequately light the shadow region, and so is still underexposed.
I suggest, on top of the number of good suggestions already mentioned, that you shoot subjects that has fairly even lighting so that you can really get a handle on understanding exposure.


cheers, Paul
---------------
Flickr (external link) | My Website (external link) | Like me on Facebook (external link)
6D | 5Dc | 17-40mm L | 28-135mm IS USM | 70-200L f4 | 100mm f2.8 macro USM | MPE65 | MT-24EX | 580EX | Kenko extension tubes | 1.4x TC
| couple of umbrellas and softbox and other lighting stuff

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
SOK
Goldmember
Avatar
1,592 posts
Likes: 2
Joined Jun 2008
Location: Gold Coast, Australia
     
Jun 25, 2011 08:06 |  #11

jerefish wrote in post #12650095 (external link)
I'm guessing you are using the kit lens...that should be thrown out.

:rolleyes:

jerefish wrote in post #12650095 (external link)
I would start looking at other's photos on here and try to figure out what makes it a good picture.

Why bother if all you need to do is ditch your gear and buy something better?

OP, take some of the comments here with a large grain of salt.

The reading suggestions are very good...but also read up on dynamic range to learn why this scene would be very difficult to execute regardless of the subject. Also check out how to select auto-focus points on your camera.

Oh...and check out this thread shot by someone using the kit lens.


Steve
SOK Images - Wedding and Event Photography Gold Coast (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Titus213
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
19,402 posts
Gallery: 4 photos
Likes: 34
Joined Feb 2005
Location: Kalama, WA USA
     
Jun 25, 2011 19:33 |  #12

Tis a poor workman who blames his tools. The kit lens is fine. I think it the rare photographer who could shoot beyond its ability.

The problem with this picture is metering. And f16 isn't helping either. Crank the lens open to its max and adjust ISO to insure adequate shutter speed. If the man is your focus you should focus and meter on him and recompose if necessary. And that means using one focus point that you select (not the camera) and a metering mode to accomplish what's desired. Probably center-weighted average in this case - again, depending on your subject.


Dave
Perspiring photographer.
Visit NorwoodPhotos.comexternal link

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
elogical
Goldmember
Avatar
1,217 posts
Joined Aug 2010
Location: St Paul, Minnesota
     
Jun 25, 2011 20:45 |  #13

There's nothing wrong with taking snapshots while you're getting used to the camera, the more you play around with it, things will start coming together for you. I wouldn't bother getting a detailed critique on your first snapshots though, just shoot, read and look at other peoples shots for ideas.

There's nothing wrong with the kit lens at all but if you're looking for "crisp" photos, keep in mind that many of the really sharp pictures you see around the forum here are taken with nicer lenses and are sharpened significantly in processing


Gear

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Crocodile101
Member
Avatar
186 posts
Joined May 2009
Location: Westchester, IL
     
Jun 25, 2011 23:20 |  #14
bannedPermanent ban

Seems to me that some of these CC are just here to keep the forum from loosing interest. This picture is something I would take while testing the exposure. What person takes such a random photo and post for recommendations, sorry man but this is way out of park. It does not have any qualities and it makes me upset when people post a photo they took on their brand new camera, then would like for someone to comment on the results on what may be a year or three for them to actually show some professional results..
Hey just keep trying, but please try to learn something before you post your first photo.


You don't take a photograph, you make it. Ansel Adams.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
shaftmaster
Goldmember
Avatar
1,429 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Nov 2008
Location: above 5000 feet
     
Jun 25, 2011 23:39 |  #15

Yeah, well it makes me upset to see people post comments that have absolutely no benefit whatsoever to this forum or anyone that reads it. Everyone has to start somewhere and asking for help should not result in being told to go away until you can show some professional results.


Paul

Gear -- Flickr (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

2,926 views & 0 likes for this thread
What did I miss with this shot?
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Critique Corner 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is MartinG
819 guests, 329 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 15144, that happened on Nov 22, 2018

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.