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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
Thread started 23 Jul 2011 (Saturday) 19:59
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Photos flashing/blinking on 7D

 
Lone ­ Rider
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Jul 23, 2011 19:59 |  #1

I made some manual camera settings to my 7D last night for night photography, and now the image on the LCD flashes between a good photo and another which highlights the borders and lower light. Even in "P" or "Auto" it does the same.

I feel like a noob and need some help restoring the settings so it will just show the one photo on the LCS.....if that make sense. :o


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Hermeto
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Jul 23, 2011 20:02 |  #2
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Flashing blinkies are just showing highlights on the picture, no need to change that.
If you still want to remove it, look for Highlight Alert in your camera settings and set it to Disable.


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Lone ­ Rider
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Jul 23, 2011 20:09 |  #3

Thanks Hermeto I found it under "Highlight alert" I have no idea why it was engaged and feel embarrassed...thanks for sharing so quickly. Thats what POTN is all about I guess - helping others.


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mikewinburn
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Jul 23, 2011 20:15 |  #4

its the default setting on the camera.
You might want to take the time to read the entire manual and play with all the settings as you read each page. A lot of folks would not bother to read it, but, I love knowing all the little nuances of the different cameras... a lot of little tricks one would never know as well! have fun!

by the by, the 7D allows you to clear the settings you've changed and restore the camera to all defaults modes as well


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Jul 23, 2011 22:13 |  #5

I'd leave the blinky thingy on.


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hairyjames
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Jul 23, 2011 22:15 |  #6

Ditto! Leave it on, it is there to help you.




  
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Lone ­ Rider
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Jul 23, 2011 23:01 as a reply to  @ windpig's post |  #7

Thanks...I found it on page 163 of the manual...

"Highlight alert" When the highlight alert is set to "Enable" overexposed highlight areas will blink. To obtain more image detail in the overexposed areas, set the exposure compensation to a negative amount and shoot again.

My scenario had half the image blinking and the other half wasn't. Wouldn't reducing exposure compensation affect the areas which weren't been highlighted?


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Mark ­ Kemp
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Jul 24, 2011 01:14 |  #8

Sportidi wrote in post #12811822 (external link)
Thanks...I found it on page 163 of the manual...

"Highlight alert" When the highlight alert is set to "Enable" overexposed highlight areas will blink. To obtain more image detail in the overexposed areas, set the exposure compensation to a negative amount and shoot again.

My scenario had half the image blinking and the other half wasn't. Wouldn't reducing exposure compensation affect the areas which weren't been highlighted?

Yes it would, you need to strike a balance between the highlights burning out and the shadows turning black.




  
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thedge
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Jul 24, 2011 08:02 |  #9

Sportidi wrote in post #12811822 (external link)
Thanks...I found it on page 163 of the manual...

"Highlight alert" When the highlight alert is set to "Enable" overexposed highlight areas will blink. To obtain more image detail in the overexposed areas, set the exposure compensation to a negative amount and shoot again.

My scenario had half the image blinking and the other half wasn't. Wouldn't reducing exposure compensation affect the areas which weren't been highlighted?

Half the image would depend on what you were shooting but yet half of it can easily blink. Blown out sky for example.

Without seeing the image, yes reducing the exposure compensation would effect the other half but it could be ok. Depends on the image and where you need the detail most.


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stsva
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Jul 24, 2011 12:28 |  #10

Here are some short articles on metering and exposure that might be helpful:
http://daystarvisions.​com/Docs/Tuts/Meter/pg​1.html (external link)
http://daystarvisions.​com/Docs/Tuts/DCExp/pg​1.html (external link)
http://www.cambridgein​colour.com/tutorials/c​amera-exposure.htm (external link)
http://www.cambridgein​colour.com/tutorials/c​amera-metering.htm (external link)


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sandpiper
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Jul 24, 2011 13:49 |  #11

Sportidi wrote in post #12811822 (external link)
My scenario had half the image blinking and the other half wasn't. Wouldn't reducing exposure compensation affect the areas which weren't been highlighted?

Yes, it will affect the whole image.

The "blinkies" are simply a tool to show you the parts of an image that are blowing out, and recording no detail. What you do with that information is up to you, but the information can be invaluable.

It sounds like, in your scenario, the sky was blown out. In this instance, you can either take steps that will affect the sky alone (such as employing a GND filter) or make an exposure choice depending on the importance of various parts of the scene. Naturally, in this case, you don't want to drastically underexpose the ground areas as that is your subject, but a small amount of compensation may bring detail into some of the sky whilst leaving the subject area enough exposure to record all the detail and bring it up in post. If you use the blinkies in conjunction with the histogram, you can tell a great deal about how your image is recording. If you have blinkies, but there is space to the left of the histogram curve, then you know you can reduce the exposure without losing shadow detail.

In another scenario, you may be photographing something light and it is the highlights that are important. A good example might be shooting a bird against dark foliage. Something like a barn owl, with it's white chest, can easily blow out in sunlight. If you watch the blinkies, the metered exposure will likely show blinkies on the chest, meaning that you have lost all feather detail. You may need -2 stops of EC to stop the blinkies and record all the detail, and you can leave the background to be underexposed as it is less important.

The histogram is useful for telling you that some parts of a scene are blowing out, but the blinkies tell you which parts - whether they are an unimportant part of the scene (perhaps spots of reflective highlights on water or chrome, which will look OK as pure white) or a vital part of the subject.

I leave my blinkies enabled to give me the most information I can get.




  
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Photos flashing/blinking on 7D
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