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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Nature & Landscapes Talk 
Thread started 26 Jul 2011 (Tuesday) 18:43
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Figuring out shutter speed when using 10 stop ND?

 
DMcGrew
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Jul 26, 2011 18:43 |  #1

Is there a simple way to figure out how long I would need to set the shutter speed when using a 10 stop ND filter? Lets say for example I'm shooting at f13 and 1/500. I know to calculate 1 stop you pretty much just half the 1/500 to 1/250 for 1 stop. But doing this for 10 stops is just too many numbers for my head :) Is there an easier way to do this? Is there some kind of calculator or an app available that will handle this?


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BzBrian
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Jul 26, 2011 19:41 |  #2

You can always get a light meter like the Sekonic L-358 - it works well for me.
Other than that, I don't know of any other way.. 10 stop is always a pain but the results are worth it!


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TBG_Dad
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Jul 26, 2011 19:48 |  #3

go here.

http://www.flickr.com/​photos/goggie3/5610408​465/ (external link)


print that. fold it in to quarters and strap it to the filter box with a rubber band.




  
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DMcGrew
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Jul 26, 2011 21:49 |  #4

TBG_Dad wrote in post #12828183 (external link)
go here.

http://www.flickr.com/​photos/goggie3/5610408​465/ (external link)


print that. fold it in to quarters and strap it to the filter box with a rubber band.

Ahhhhh PERFECT!! Thanks! :)


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huntersdad
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Jul 27, 2011 08:16 as a reply to  @ DMcGrew's post |  #5

I always counted as I adjusted. SInce I use half stops, 10 stops is 20 clicks.


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Dinoman
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Jul 27, 2011 15:26 |  #6

If you have an iPhone/iPod Touch you can download the app LongTime. Probably similar apps for other devices. The app I referenced pretty much just does the chart TBG_Dad linked but you can pick anywhere from 1 to 20 stops. :)


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argyle
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Jul 27, 2011 16:18 as a reply to  @ Dinoman's post |  #7

You can carry a chart, or just use the calculator on your cell phone and multiply your unfiltered shutter speed by 1000 (the filter factor). For example, 1/500 * 1000 = 2 seconds; back off your shutter dial 30 clicks (assuming your camera is set to default at 1/3-stops) to arrive at 2-seconds also.


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DMcGrew
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Jul 27, 2011 20:17 |  #8

Dinoman wrote in post #12833006 (external link)
If you have an iPhone/iPod Touch you can download the app LongTime. Probably similar apps for other devices. The app I referenced pretty much just does the chart TBG_Dad linked but you can pick anywhere from 1 to 20 stops. :)


Even better :) This app is perfect.


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Patrick-70
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Aug 05, 2011 12:34 |  #9

I use live view on my 7D which can simulate the exposition ; I use my camera in manual mode.


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EdATX
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Aug 05, 2011 13:44 |  #10

I got a APP for my droid phone. I meter w/o lens, plug in the stops and all info I wanna use with the filter on, and it gives me the exposure.


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starlights
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Aug 12, 2011 23:02 |  #11

I have just purchased a Hoya ND x400 recently to take with me for a trip to zanzibar - so i am in the same boat as the OP - here is one article i found very useful. Hope this helps others:

http://www.redbubble.c​om …o-neutral-density-filters (external link)

Brilliant Article - Here is a quote from the Author on Calculating Exposure:

The purists are going to cringe when they read this, but when you are composing and focusing your shot before screwing in the BG, I wouldn’t worry about the exposure. In other words, don’t stress about having to calculate how many stops of overexposure you need to get an evenly-balanced exposure after putting the BG on. I have tried to do this and have never succeeded in getting anything other than an overexposed blob. I have a theory its to do with light intensity. And besides, one of the major advantages of using a BG is that you do not have to adjust ISO to compensate for bright light and instead you have greater control over aperture and speed. I discuss ISO and BGs more below, but my point is this: if you want to use ISO 100 just do it. If you want to use f22 or f2.8 or whatever, just do it. You can because what’s left is speed, and the BG gives you enormous range in that regard to find the right exposure when using the BG for any particular shot.
Another reason for not worrying about the exposure is that f stop compensation calculations assume you won’t also be using a Grad ND, which will darken your image. Try doing the calculations for that!
In the absence of doing those exposure calculations, it is a case of trial and error. 60 seconds and your image is still dark? Well shoot again, this time at 90 seconds. A little too overexposed? Well try again, this time at 75 seconds. Each time you are narrowing down the exposure time. The more you use the BG, the more comfortable you’ll get with gut feel. Bear in mind that if you shoot at, say, 300 seconds, adjusting the next shot to 315 seconds is not going to make a discernable difference. A 15 second differential will, however, make a difference between 60 and 75 seconds. Also bear in mind that the person I consider to be the Monochrome King of the BG (see below) admits that success with long exposures is “trial and error”, just like I said.




  
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thenextguy
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Aug 14, 2011 01:36 |  #12

Patrick-70 wrote in post #12882828 (external link)
I use live view on my 7D which can simulate the exposition ; I use my camera in manual mode.

I usually end up doing this. With the histogram and my eyeballs, I can get a good exposure.


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lightbender57
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Aug 16, 2011 12:48 |  #13

DMcGrew wrote in post #12827883 (external link)
Is there a simple way to figure out how long I would need to set the shutter speed when using a 10 stop ND filter? Lets say for example I'm shooting at f13 and 1/500. I know to calculate 1 stop you pretty much just half the 1/500 to 1/250 for 1 stop. But doing this for 10 stops is just too many numbers for my head :) Is there an easier way to do this? Is there some kind of calculator or an app available that will handle this?

++++++++++++
Your SLR can be set up so that each click of the shutter speed dail equals a half stop. So, once you have the proper exposure for the scene with NO filter, just screw on the filter and decrease your shutter speed by 20 "clicks". Pretty simple.
You'll probably find that is a good starting point. Pay attention to your histogram, it won't lie.


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sulli.gibson
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Aug 16, 2011 14:00 |  #14

huntersdad wrote in post #12830520 (external link)
I always counted as I adjusted. SInce I use half stops, 10 stops is 20 clicks.

that works until you have to go past 30 seconds, which is pretty much what you use a 10 stop filter to do. the only way to really do this is to calculate with a chart/app/calculator. i know from experience


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huntersdad
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Sep 16, 2011 08:36 |  #15

sulli.gibson wrote in post #12946162 (external link)
that works until you have to go past 30 seconds, which is pretty much what you use a 10 stop filter to do. the only way to really do this is to calculate with a chart/app/calculator. i know from experience

From there, it's math in the head or on the calculator.


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Figuring out shutter speed when using 10 stop ND?
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