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FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos The Business of Photography 
Thread started 16 Aug 2011 (Tuesday) 14:25
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What would you do in this situation

 
amairphoto
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Aug 16, 2011 14:25 |  #1

.I had to shoot some food the other day for a client. It was a steak shot and it wasnt working shooting at an angle because i had to do it in the back of a casino, so i did an overhead shot. Whilst i was going through the pics on my camera at the end of the shoot the chef wanted to see the ones of the steak. He said he liked the side angle one. I still thought it looked like ****.
So i sent across the images and didnt include the side angle one. Now theyre asking for it. I told them that i dont feel comfortable having that shot be a reflection of my work and that i wouldnt want to send it over. Now theyre demanding that i sent over all the pictures i took.

I work with the agency a lot so dont want to rub them the wrong way but i dont like that pic at all.......... what would you do?


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emelvee
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Aug 16, 2011 15:45 |  #2

Perhaps this is a lesson of not letting people see the images until they are on your computer and you have looked through them and decided which ones you wanted your clients to see. I know, it's after the fact ... but maybe something you should keep in mind for next time.


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Curtis ­ N
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Aug 16, 2011 16:12 |  #3

The customer is always right.


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butugly
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Aug 16, 2011 16:13 |  #4

Maybe your being over critical of your own work, I know we all do it sometimes.
Post up the overhead and the side view for us to salivate over.
And if it is that bad you just wont add it to your portfolio.




  
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Matthew ­ Patrick
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Aug 16, 2011 16:14 |  #5

This is a sticky wicket. It seems like you have to find the path of least resistance. They might think you're just being too much of an "artist" and that the image is fine, but for some reason you don't like it. Try to look at the whole situation from their position.

Will releasing the image minimize the damage done? Will not releasing the image create more of a problem than submitting sub-par work? Can you do a quick re-shoot?

I would rather release a bad image if it means a better chance of getting the next gig. They might agree that the image should not be used or they might use the image and never use you again.

Whatever you decide to do, I would be very cautious and try very hard to gauge their impressions of you. If they don't trust your ability to judge your own work, you may encounter more trust issues and then it's all down hill. It would seem like a compromise would be in everyone's best interest at this point




  
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nathancarter
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Aug 16, 2011 16:15 |  #6

Give the client what they want, and learn the lesson that emelvee stated so it doesn't happen next time.

Also, in this case, you're not showcasing your work, you're showcasing the chef's work.
How many people are going to see the photograph and think, "That steak looks delicious!"
How many people are going to see it and think, "The angle on that photograph of the steak isn't quite right, plus the highlights are blown on the edge of the plate, and the composition doesn't follow the Golden Mean... I'm going to go have a ham sandwich"


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BreitlingFan
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Aug 16, 2011 20:12 |  #7
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I'm pretty sure the worst client to have isn't the guy who really likes your work. In this case, you have someone who really likes a photo you took and, for whatever reason, feels that a particular photo you took is perfect for what he wants.

Sorry, man, I fail to see a problem there.

You're not presenting a photo for customers to review, he's presenting a steak for customers to review...


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airfrogusmc
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Aug 16, 2011 20:16 as a reply to  @ BreitlingFan's post |  #8

I lost a client once because I wouldn't give them shots I thought were substandard. It was a sizable account. Within 6 months they were back and I of course increased my rates. When its all said and done everything you produce and everything that gets out your door is a reflection of you and your work. If bad stuff gets out it can hurt a lot worse than the short end gain.




  
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quiksquirrel
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Aug 16, 2011 20:27 |  #9

If you really don't feel comfortable with that photo, don't send it.
"the costumer is always right" is a pile of crap. Your professional integrity is not.

If you don't want to just say no, give them a reason that they understand. You may not like it for various technical reasons, but those mean nothing to people outside the business. But they will understand if you tell them it's out of focus, noisy (use other words) or in some other way beyond saving.
If they have only seen it on the back of your camera, they have no way of knowing.

Remember that most chefs are like little girls. They are prima donne. if he thinks that this particular photo shows hes work in a bad light, he will be more than happy to have it erased.

Personally, I wouldn't do that. I have no problem with just saying no. But if you are not comfortable with that, just use other words.

Remind them why they hired you in the first place. If they want a professional result, they need to trust that the professional knows what he is doing. And knows things they don't.




  
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NorseHorse
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Aug 16, 2011 23:38 as a reply to  @ quiksquirrel's post |  #10

The last comments reflects the sentiment that 'doing the best work is what gets you more work'. I would think carefully about that.

My experience is that happy customers are even more important.


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Miki ­ G
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Aug 17, 2011 05:55 |  #11

Why not post your shots here with a poll for people who are actually interested in photography & see if they think you should give the customer the side view shot?




  
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amfoto1
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Aug 17, 2011 09:40 |  #12

Put your ego away and give the client what they want. Obviouisly the client sees something in the shot you don't like, that better works for their needs. Your needs and feelings are secondary to theirs, when they are paying for the work.

I don't know why people sometimes choose one shot over another. I do cull out the ones I really don't want to see the light of day, before I let them review anything. But ultimately, they are paying the bill so it's up to them. Sometimes it's not the "most beautiful" shot that does the job best for the client.

Alternatively, if there is something technically wrong with the shot you don't want them to use, offer to reshoot at no additional cost, discussing it with them carefully before, during and after.

Satisfied customers who refer business to you will be your single biggest source of customers in the future.


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Frugal
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Aug 17, 2011 13:20 as a reply to  @ amfoto1's post |  #13

Put your ego away and give the client what they want. Obviouisly the client sees something in the shot you don't like, that better works for their needs. Your needs and feelings are secondary to theirs, when they are paying for the work.

Satisfied customers who refer business to you will be your single biggest source of customers in the future.

^^ Agreed. For a commercial shoot I usually let the client look at the first shot on the LCD (gasp) and ask them to look at angle, background but not picture quality to make sure that it's what they are looking for. Works for me


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tomj
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Aug 18, 2011 13:24 |  #14

Any chance of explaining to the client your misgivings and asking to reshoot it, working out whatever problem you had the first time?


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airfrogusmc
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Aug 18, 2011 13:30 |  #15

Frugal wrote in post #12952487 (external link)
^^ Agreed. For a commercial shoot I usually let the client look at the first shot on the LCD (gasp) and ask them to look at angle, background but not picture quality to make sure that it's what they are looking for. Works for me

I'm just the opposite I only show clients what I want them to see. I am the one that knows photography and I know it better than any of them. I'm the expert thats why I get hired. Thats not ego, thats a fact.




  
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