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Thread started 20 Aug 2011 (Saturday) 22:06
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High Key Portrait

 
mgrover
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Aug 20, 2011 22:06 |  #1

I'm working on my high key editing - actually this is the first high key image I have created. Please let me know your thoughts...


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TheBurningCrown
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Aug 20, 2011 22:09 |  #2

This doesn't say high-key to me, this just says overexposed. Just blown highlights everywhere...

Sorry for being harsh :(.


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mgrover
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Aug 20, 2011 22:20 |  #3

TheBurningCrown wrote in post #12970385 (external link)
This doesn't say high-key to me, this just says overexposed. Just blown highlights everywhere...

Sorry for being harsh :(.

Thanks for the comment - I guess I don't quite agree. Do you have any examples of what you would consider high key so I can see the difference? I really want to learn how to get this right...


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PhotogWannabe
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Aug 20, 2011 22:52 |  #4

Google "high key lighting" for examples and definitions.




  
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TheBurningCrown
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Aug 20, 2011 23:20 |  #5

mgrover wrote in post #12970433 (external link)
Thanks for the comment - I guess I don't quite agree. Do you have any examples of what you would consider high key so I can see the difference? I really want to learn how to get this right...

High key basically means that the majority of values in the scene is above middle gray; that the values are usually all of light tone. If you have a white subject on a white background and expose correctly, that's already high key. Overexposing is a different story. Same thing with low key. Underexposing a subject to get "low key" lighting is equally as incorrect. It's about the lighting ratios (and subsequent contrast), not the lighting power.

If you do a Google image search for "high key" you should be able to see what I mean. For your image: she's just overexposed (again, in my opinion). Too much spill coming from the back and wiping out her features (and even the edges of her face).


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bboehm
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Aug 20, 2011 23:39 |  #6

Yeah... really looks way overexposed to me too. Not really diggin it.


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Aug 20, 2011 23:53 |  #7

As it stands its a good experimental with her sort of blending/appearing out of the white background.


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Aug 21, 2011 00:31 |  #8

I'd say blowing highlights in a high key image can be ok in certain cases, but I prefer separation from the background. A little work and another attempt and I'm sure you will get it perfect. I'd like to see your pre process image, If the highlights are there, you could probably still use this image...




  
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booja
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Aug 21, 2011 01:32 |  #9

When I think of high key images I think of an image that is mostly white and bright. But not necessarily over exposed. More like bringing the top of your curves up. Where the highlights are. But still have defined lines of the subject and background and separation of the two. In your example she blends right in bc of it being over exposed.




  
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mgrover
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Aug 21, 2011 08:15 as a reply to  @ booja's post |  #10

Thanks everyone for the feedback so far. I expected some harsh feedback as this is the first time I have attempted this type of image, but this is how we get better.

Here is the original unedited image.

IMAGE: http://farm7.static.flickr.com/6205/6064890779_55cfd45e48_b.jpg

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TheBurningCrown
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Aug 21, 2011 13:22 |  #11

mgrover wrote in post #12971766 (external link)
Here is the original unedited image.

That's much nicer! When trying this again, do it with the light (and not in post). Aim more of the lighting towards the backdrop.


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airfrogusmc
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Aug 21, 2011 13:25 |  #12

TheBurningCrown wrote in post #12972847 (external link)
That's much nicer! When trying this again, do it with the light (and not in post). Aim more of the lighting towards the backdrop.

And a flatter more butterfly light type on the subject.




  
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Tweet
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Aug 21, 2011 13:55 |  #13

I was just looking in photoshop at the image. I am by no means a high-key expert, but I am pretty decent w/ photoshop. What I think, and what airfrogusmc was eluding to, is that with this contrasty lighting, which has highlights near the edges of the face, it is difficult to get the image brighter with out blowing out those highlights. If the lighing was flat or even with a ringlight, it would be even so if you raised the brightness with curves or something similar, the entire face would be brighter, i.e. high-key. I was reading some tutorials and IDK. Maybe you could selectively brighten the center of the face.




  
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airfrogusmc
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Aug 21, 2011 14:02 as a reply to  @ Tweet's post |  #14

Most of the great hey key effect work has usually fairly shadowless light on the subject because shadows are fighting the very high key concept, thus butterfly or main light straight ahead of subject straight out and up a bit from subjects face but straight out as to not leave a shadow on one side of the nose or the other just a small one directly under it and a pure white shadowless background. Usually you need to do this in camera to do it right with some photoshop enhancement. You are right about the kickers are killing this.




  
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jetcode
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Aug 21, 2011 14:18 |  #15

TheBurningCrown wrote in post #12970685 (external link)
High key basically means that the majority of values in the scene is above middle gray; that the values are usually all of light tone. If you have a white subject on a white background and expose correctly, that's already high key. Overexposing is a different story. Same thing with low key. Underexposing a subject to get "low key" lighting is equally as incorrect. It's about the lighting ratios (and subsequent contrast), not the lighting power.

If you do a Google image search for "high key" you should be able to see what I mean. For your image: she's just overexposed (again, in my opinion). Too much spill coming from the back and wiping out her features (and even the edges of her face).

Nice and concise and to the point. Well stated.




  
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