Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 29 Sep 2011 (Thursday) 23:55
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

Polarizing filter?

 
carsonbm
Member
44 posts
Joined Aug 2010
Location: N.E. Ohio
     
Sep 29, 2011 23:55 |  #1

To get the white balance right, do I have to take the white balance reading before I put the filter on the lens?



Canon 60D with the 18 to 200mm lens. Canon G11 and 430EX II flash.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
xarqi
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
10,435 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Oct 2005
Location: Aotearoa/New Zealand
     
Sep 30, 2011 06:05 |  #2

No, after.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
x_tan
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
8,153 posts
Gallery: 137 photos
Best ofs: 3
Likes: 496
Joined Sep 2010
Location: ɐılɐɹʇsnɐ 'ǝuɹnoqlǝɯ
     
Sep 30, 2011 06:09 |  #3

Shoot RAW, easier to fix if WB problem anyway.


Canon 5D3 + Zoom (EF 17-40L, 24-105L & 28-300L, 100-400L II) & Prime (24L II, 85L II, 100L, 135L & 200 f/2.8L II; Zeiss 1,4/35)
Sony α7r + Zeiss 1,8/55 FE
Nikon Coolpix A; Nikon F3 & F100 + Zeiss 1,4/50
Retiring  (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
paddler4
Goldmember
Avatar
1,325 posts
Gallery: 3 photos
Likes: 14
Joined Aug 2009
     
Sep 30, 2011 06:50 |  #4

the WB reading should be the same as the sensor sees. So after.


Check out my photos at http://dkoretz.smugmug​.com (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
cueball
Senior Member
Avatar
507 posts
Gallery: 2 photos
Likes: 140
Joined Jun 2008
Location: Illinois
     
Sep 30, 2011 09:40 |  #5

x_tan wrote in post #13186262 (external link)
Shoot RAW, easier to fix if WB problem anyway.

+1 for this...


Canon: 5D Mark IV, EOS R, 35 f1.4L II, 85 f1.4L IS, 16-35 f4L IS, 24-70 f2.8L II, 70-200 f2.8L IS II, 100-400 f4.5-5.6L IS II, 100 f2.8L IS Macro, 2X III, 1.4X III, 580EX II, 430EX
Feedback: https://photography-on-the.net …=12723614&postc​ount=27889, https://photography-on-the.net …=13303433&postc​ount=30051

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
steve40
Member
Avatar
188 posts
Joined Aug 2011
Location: Asheville, North Carolina
     
Sep 30, 2011 09:55 as a reply to  @ cueball's post |  #6

a Polarizing filter has no effect, on the temperature/color of light. So you can make WB adjustments, either before or after you install the filter. Its only affect is to cut light by roughly 1/2 - 1 stop, depending on the amount of polarization used.


Steve40.
http://steveslandscape​s.50webs.com (external link)
Cameras: Canon G12, SX150 is, & A1200.
Darkroom & Printer: PhotoShop Elements 9, Canon Pixma iX6520.
Tripods: Manfrotto 190XPROB & Giottos MT 9251 + Several Heads.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
bjyoder
Goldmember
Avatar
1,664 posts
Joined Jun 2007
Location: Central Ohio
     
Sep 30, 2011 09:57 |  #7

Because of the way the cameras today work, putting the polarizer on before you take your WB reading is the way to go. All the decisions made by the camera in regards to WB are done after the light reaches the camera itself, which means the light has to go through the lens and whatever filter you have on the camera at the time.

And, while shooting RAW will help if you fudge the WB setting a bit, if you set it first, that's one less thing you have to do after the fact!


Ben

500px (external link) | Website (external link) | Gear

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
bjyoder
Goldmember
Avatar
1,664 posts
Joined Jun 2007
Location: Central Ohio
     
Sep 30, 2011 09:59 |  #8

steve40 wrote in post #13187015 (external link)
a Polarizing filter has no effect, on the temperature/color of light. So you can make WB adjustments, either before or after you install the filter. Its only affect is to cut light by 1/2 - 1 stop, depending on the amount of polarization used.

For a good, high quality filter yes, but some filters may add a color cast.

Also, there is a different color of light overall that reaches the camera after the light has been polarized; think of trees on an Autumn day, where you reduce the glare from the waxy leaves, and there is much more color coming through to the sensor.


Ben

500px (external link) | Website (external link) | Gear

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
steve40
Member
Avatar
188 posts
Joined Aug 2011
Location: Asheville, North Carolina
     
Sep 30, 2011 10:10 as a reply to  @ bjyoder's post |  #9

A polarizing filter has effect on the color of light, as far as the camera is concerned. Polarizing light only changes the angle of the light rays, to reduce reflections. Look at the color of the filter, its neutral gray that does not affect the way the camera sees light temprature. You can use a custom white balance if you feel that is important, or just use the AWB, it really makes no difference in most cases. There are a few circumstances where a custom white balance is necessary, but they are not the average.

It only took me a little over 60 years, to learn this little fact. The only filters that may affect light, are the sorry filters Tiffen makes they are always a little warm.


Steve40.
http://steveslandscape​s.50webs.com (external link)
Cameras: Canon G12, SX150 is, & A1200.
Darkroom & Printer: PhotoShop Elements 9, Canon Pixma iX6520.
Tripods: Manfrotto 190XPROB & Giottos MT 9251 + Several Heads.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
MCAsan
Goldmember
Avatar
3,871 posts
Likes: 80
Joined Jun 2010
Location: Atlanta
     
Sep 30, 2011 10:51 as a reply to  @ steve40's post |  #10

If you are shooting raw, set the body to AWB. In your PP software you can adjust temp (blue-yellow) and tint (green-magenta) in any direction you like.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
FastCougar
Member
127 posts
Joined Aug 2011
Location: Eastern Panhandle, WV
     
Sep 30, 2011 11:02 |  #11

MCAsan wrote in post #13187257 (external link)
If you are shooting raw, set the body to AWB. In your PP software you can adjust temp (blue-yellow) and tint (green-magenta) in any direction you like.

+1 :)


Trevor | Canon 7D & T1i | Canon 24-70mm f/2.8 L | Canon 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS | Sigma DC 17-70mm f/2.8-4.5

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
ktownhero
Senior Member
313 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Apr 2011
     
Sep 30, 2011 11:32 |  #12

MCAsan wrote in post #13187257 (external link)
If you are shooting raw, set the body to AWB. In your PP software you can adjust temp (blue-yellow) and tint (green-magenta) in any direction you like.

This. RAW allows you to not have to worry about WB while shooting.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
steve40
Member
Avatar
188 posts
Joined Aug 2011
Location: Asheville, North Carolina
     
Sep 30, 2011 11:35 as a reply to  @ FastCougar's post |  #13

Not everybody shoots RAW, or necessarily wants to. If you are so worried about WB, buy yourself a Gray Card. Set your white balance from it, after! you install whatever filter. Especially a Tiffen, they tend to be a little too warm.


Steve40.
http://steveslandscape​s.50webs.com (external link)
Cameras: Canon G12, SX150 is, & A1200.
Darkroom & Printer: PhotoShop Elements 9, Canon Pixma iX6520.
Tripods: Manfrotto 190XPROB & Giottos MT 9251 + Several Heads.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
bjyoder
Goldmember
Avatar
1,664 posts
Joined Jun 2007
Location: Central Ohio
     
Oct 01, 2011 10:03 |  #14

steve40 wrote in post #13187085 (external link)
A polarizing filter has effect on the color of light, as far as the camera is concerned. Polarizing light only changes the angle of the light rays, to reduce reflections. Look at the color of the filter, its neutral gray that does not affect the way the camera sees light temprature. You can use a custom white balance if you feel that is important, or just use the AWB, it really makes no difference in most cases. There are a few circumstances where a custom white balance is necessary, but they are not the average.

It only took me a little over 60 years, to learn this little fact. The only filters that may affect light, are the sorry filters Tiffen makes they are always a little warm.

I'm going to assume there should have been a "no" in that first sentence, and you're right in that a good polarizer will be color neutral. However, there is a difference in the color of light reaching the camera sensor. If used to, say, get a better exposure for the sky, much more blue light is going to be recorded, and the camera will adjust accordingly.


Ben

500px (external link) | Website (external link) | Gear

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

2,117 views & 0 likes for this thread
Polarizing filter?
FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is countrygirl67
833 guests, 176 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 15144, that happened on Nov 22, 2018

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.