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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Weddings & Other Family Events Talk 
Thread started 09 Aug 2011 (Tuesday) 13:12
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2nd Wedding Blues - Lighting a big room

 
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Aug 10, 2011 14:00 |  #16

I like option 2. You should get some nice background lighting with the strobes bouncing off the ceiling, and it doenst matter if there is a color cast. In fact, I actually like a different color cast in the background, really making the subjects pop out.


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bigarchi
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Aug 10, 2011 14:05 |  #17

emdzey01 wrote in post #12910684 (external link)
you can bounce the bees off the vaulted ceilings while being fully aware of the color cast issues it might present. you'll still want to use you on-camera flash for fill, so gel accordingly (maybe some RED+CTO, can't tell what the color cast will be).

if i were presented with that situation, i'd put the bees on the balcony and point it down to keep it simple (not sure if a modifier would still soften the light given the distance); on-camera flash with negative compensation for fill.

either way, you wouldn't want the strobes to kill the mood of the images. if the couple wants it dark with candles and christmas lights, do your best to incorporate it to the photos. nuking the ambient and lighting up the whole place shouldn't be your priority.

agree with your whole post, but I definitely agree with this.


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Aug 10, 2011 16:48 |  #18

I don't think it's an either-or situation.

What triggers do you have? Do both Option 1 and Option 2, and set them on different channels on the trigger - and flip your transmitter's channel on the fly as you want different lighting. Option 3 is to turn off your transmitter, leaving ambient (and on-camera) only. Option 4 would be to take 30 seconds to run up to the balcony and change the channel on the receivers, so they all light up at once. And Option 5 is your wife with a lightstick. They don't all have to be mutually exclusive, I don't think.


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tim
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Aug 10, 2011 17:01 |  #19

Candles put out effectively no light. I remember years ago trying to take photos of my gf, even with a half dozen candles really close I was at an exposure like ISO3200 F1.4 1/30th.

The flames on the candles themselves will be visible no matter what power you set the strobes to, but the light from the candles won't be visible unless you're shooting purely ambient - any strobe will overwhelm them.

Try it at home. Light a few candles in a reasonable sized room, take photos with and without flash. Learn how to balance things before the wedding, not during.


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Aug 11, 2011 07:10 |  #20

That room is quite easy to light since it has balconies. Place your AB's so that each one is on a balcony, pointing down to a section of floor. If you have grids, use them. If not, think about wrapping each light with a cone of black wrap. This way you get a smaller spot of light.

Each light should hit a different section of floor. Then use your 580EX on camera (with a bounce card) and dial in a minus 1 or 2 stop compensation for fill.

You might want to have one of your AB in the back of the room aimed at the middle of the floor and flooded. This will give you some lovely back light.

Keep all your lights on low power and shoot at high ISO. You won't kill all the ambient so it will look quite nice.


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JAPE
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Aug 11, 2011 11:21 |  #21

I was at a recent wedding, and the photographer had a 580 ex II and a ton of 430ex's around the venue attached to poles, so when she shot a picture the nearest flash along with 580 went off, which provided enough lighting.


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siddr20
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Aug 12, 2011 01:25 |  #22

Dont forget to post some pics you took here so we can see the result and learn from it.
Cheers


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Bentapp2
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Aug 12, 2011 17:25 |  #23

Those seem like great options Kell, what I was going to suggest.




  
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kellmeister
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Aug 13, 2011 16:09 |  #24

I have pocketwizards tt5/tt1 for triggers. I need to pick up some ac9's for the alien bees... One of my concerns is that there may not be enough plug-in's for the 4 ab's in the balcony/reception hall and I only have one vagabond. I guess could use about 4-430exii's about now!

LOL, there's always something.


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Oct 06, 2011 23:06 |  #25

Just had a short time to play around with some lights tonight in the large reception hall.

Tried lighting the room tonight using ab400's from the stage on 1/8 power. Settings on the camera were 1600iso 1/160, on-camera flash -3.

I know everyone said that they would use the balconies, but I thought the spread from the stage would work. But from the photos, I don't know. Lots of harsh shadows and the lights are a little intrusive and kills the ambient.

Would help to pull my iso down at least...Looks like 2 strobes in the top balcony facing down, may be the way to go.


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Gel
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Oct 07, 2011 03:31 |  #26

Ok, based on the above I'd do the following.

IS1600-3200 F2.8 at all times.

Bounce the flash off the walls, not the ceilings. It's much easier to keep the flash heads discrete this way and wil give you a more natural look. The last thing I would want in such a scenario is to go to take a shot of someone only to find it blasted with direct flash.

Ultimately though by keeping the ISO high you will capture some of the ambient and this will blend the flash more. Also gel your flashes with 1/2 or full CTS (Not CTO) gel as it'll make the white balance issues go away as long as you shoot RAW.

If you are worried about light spill from the flash heads snoot them without a grid and try not to use a diffuser where possible and you'll lose around a stop of light in the process.

From those images I'd put one in each top balcony pointing at the ceiling that's still there (carefull of the bounce angle with one bounced off the wall above the door and another on the other side.

Direct flash like above can create too harsh a shadow and burned outlines. If you set up all the flashes individually you can still retain the ambient light and if you position them correctly.

Finally when all four fire, increase / decrease the flash output in the area with the weakest amount of light to 1/60 at F.4.0 (usually the centre) - this is for two reasons. 1. People absorb the light in the distance between the weakest point and the flash head, 2. The lighting will be in your complete control so any areas where there is more should be consitent and all they will require is a smaller aperture.

Ultimately you should end up with a fixed lighting setup where all you need to change is the aperture.
If for any reason something requires a faster shutter speed you can just open up the aperture a stop and double the shutter speed.

Good times.

Edit: Looks like you have ambient spots for the stage too, you could always see if they turn.


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bigarchi
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Oct 07, 2011 08:05 as a reply to  @ Gel's post |  #27

what an awesome venue.
it's great that you went there and tested your thoughts out like this. definitely a good idea.
I would probably do exactly what jcolman said above though.

man, i gotta get more bees :)


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Oct 07, 2011 17:44 |  #28

I'd love to see the results from this :)


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Oct 08, 2011 08:56 |  #29

tim wrote in post #12912162 (external link)
Candles put out effectively no light. I remember years ago trying to take photos of my gf, even with a half dozen candles really close I was at an exposure like ISO3200 F1.4 1/30th.

The flames on the candles themselves will be visible no matter what power you set the strobes to, but the light from the candles won't be visible unless you're shooting purely ambient - any strobe will overwhelm them.

Try it at home. Light a few candles in a reasonable sized room, take photos with and without flash. Learn how to balance things before the wedding, not during.

Gotta disagree with you on this. High ISO + gelled flash bounced behind me. The room was lit by candle light alone + some small can lights in the ceiling.

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tim
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Oct 08, 2011 19:07 |  #30

jcolman wrote in post #13221074 (external link)
Gotta disagree with you on this. High ISO + gelled flash bounced behind me. The room was lit by candle light alone + some small can lights in the ceiling.

QUOTED IMAGE

There are heaps of light in the ceiling of that room! I know that when I did it, 4-6 of those little tea candles, really close to the person, wasn't much light.


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2nd Wedding Blues - Lighting a big room
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