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FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos The Business of Photography 
Thread started 12 Oct 2011 (Wednesday) 13:48
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Individual Hi-Res File Pricing

 
TwistedGray
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Oct 12, 2011 13:48 |  #1

(note: Has since been resolved, thanks for the responses. Feel free to add you opinion in case someone does a search in the future and finds this thread...)

I went back 10 pages and couldn't find anything to help me so figured I'd post up.

I'll be shooting two vehicles on Sunday. They are owned by the same customer. I would normally just charge a flat rate per vehicle ($250), give them edited images on a cd that they can do with as they please.

However, this customer wants to see the proofs first and then just buy the high-res file of the image they want so that he can print them himself. This is the first time I've come across this so don't know how to quote him a per image cost.

On one hand if I quote $20 an image he would have to chose 25 files which probably won't happen, maybe...I don't know. If I did something more like $100 a file then I think it's more likely he would choose 5 files, but probably not any more. However, would someone even chose 5 files...who knows.

I have only been dealing with the person who was modifying his vehicles so I only know about this guy second hand until now. The customer, owner of vehicles, has seen my work and likes it enough to consider buying the images and is requesting a quote from me.


Any help?


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Mistabernie
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Oct 12, 2011 16:10 |  #2

Kind of a tough situation.

You can keep the cost of the file down to $25-$50 each, but you'd probably want to charge a session fee to make that work to ensure you're getting paid for your work. Perhaps what you could do is evaluate how much you would normally make and how much time you would normally shoot for a shoot like this. Then, when you determine the value of the session (let's give it a random number of $250), give partial credit towards the purchase of the hi-def files (and price breaks for more files the customer wants to purchase) -- for example, give the customer 1/2 credit towards the images, but if they only buy one or two images, you charge $50 per image with no refunds on unused credit (but they can keep the credit for later). If they want more images, drop the charge down to the $20 an image you were thinking about, and hope he wants ~100.

You're not trying to get rich here, but you do need to be compensated for your work, and pricing 'by the image' doesn't quite work, unless there is a guarantee to sell a certain number of images at a certain price, which seems unlikely.


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TwistedGray
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Oct 12, 2011 16:22 |  #3

Mistabernie wrote in post #13241658 (external link)
Kind of a tough situation.

You can keep the cost of the file down to $25-$50 each, but you'd probably want to charge a session fee to make that work to ensure you're getting paid for your work. Perhaps what you could do is evaluate how much you would normally make and how much time you would normally shoot for a shoot like this. Then, when you determine the value of the session (let's give it a random number of $250), give partial credit towards the purchase of the hi-def files (and price breaks for more files the customer wants to purchase) -- for example, give the customer 1/2 credit towards the images, but if they only buy one or two images, you charge $50 per image with no refunds on unused credit (but they can keep the credit for later). If they want more images, drop the charge down to the $20 an image you were thinking about, and hope he wants ~100.

You're not trying to get rich here, but you do need to be compensated for your work, and pricing 'by the image' doesn't quite work, unless there is a guarantee to sell a certain number of images at a certain price, which seems unlikely.

That's something I was thinking (re: sitting fee). Thanks for laying it out for me :)


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tim
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Oct 12, 2011 19:00 |  #4

$250 for the first file, additional free.

Don't let people dictate your pricing. They just want to get you cheap. Given the time invested in the shoot and pricing let them know your minimum charge, and make sure they pay it before you turn up, or at least a deposit on the day of the shoot.

People want everything free or cheap. You can choose not to shoot something if the price isn't right.


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Dan ­ Marchant
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Oct 12, 2011 23:30 as a reply to  @ tim's post |  #5

Cost is not the only issue here, the intended use is also something that needs to be considered, especially when giving out high res digital files.

Most togs charge a session fee and then a fee for each print. They don't give out digital files because you lose control over what happens to them next. The intended use may well be for personal prints and/or promotion of their business or car collection (or whatever). However, with high res digital files there is nothing (other than a legal document) stopping them from selling prints or even just selling the digital image.

For this reason it is important to have an acceptable use license that makes it clear that you still own the copyright and clearly defines what they are allowed to do with the image.


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TwistedGray
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Oct 12, 2011 23:41 |  #6

Thanks for the head's up Dan, will consider than when writing up the contract.


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realitysays
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Oct 13, 2011 01:06 as a reply to  @ TwistedGray's post |  #7

Great post, especially regarding cars as i'm an automotive/motorsport photographer as well.
As you might know, everyone spends so much $$$$ on the car and doesn't want to pay for good photos. It makes no sense, but i guess in this day and age, everyone is a tightass.

As suggested, charge a sitting fee as minimum.
Tim also mentioned a good point - Don't let people dictate your pricing.

Depending on what you are doing, whether it be statics, rig shot, light painting, charge your minimum ($250) and then go from there. Possibly discount the second vehicle, so the total shoot and all images will be $400.
Of course you don't want to lose the business or the opportunity to shoot the cars, but you don't want to be short changed.

Keen to see what kind of contract you write up as i'm in the process of trying to get one done also!


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Oct 13, 2011 03:42 |  #8

I'd say $150 shoot fee per car plus $75 per digital file. Normally you'd get $500 per car, this time you are getting $300 for sure and hopefully at least an additional $150 (one image per car). That's $450, so not the full price you'd usually charge, but it's still less then he would pay per car and it DOES mean a little less work for you. Seems fair to me.


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TwistedGray
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Oct 13, 2011 08:30 |  #9

Well, Well that went over rather smoothly I must say. When it's all said and done I'll pocket more than I originally anticipated...a win, win!

Now onto this contract jargon, oh do I hate contracts...what ever happened to the gentlemen's agreement anyways.


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Dan ­ Marchant
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Oct 13, 2011 23:10 |  #10

TwistedGray wrote in post #13244813 (external link)
Now onto this contract jargon, oh do I hate contracts...what ever happened to the gentlemen's agreement anyways.

Too many people had their fingers crossed behind their backs while they were shaking hands on the deal :(

Also, when it comes to photographic images most people simply don't understand copyright law. They assume that payment means they own the image and a piece of paper is needed to clearly explain what they can or can't do. Its a pain in the bum but not much we can do about it.


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USER876
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Oct 14, 2011 09:52 as a reply to  @ Dan Marchant's post |  #11

Charge a 250 package fee

Give them a proofing disk of low res watermarked files and offer 1-3 files of clients choice in high resolution that include extra retouching.




  
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illrooster132
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Oct 14, 2011 10:43 |  #12

Dan Marchant wrote in post #13243719 (external link)
Cost is not the only issue here, the intended use is also something that needs to be considered, especially when giving out high res digital files.

Most togs charge a session fee and then a fee for each print. They don't give out digital files because you lose control over what happens to them next. The intended use may well be for personal prints and/or promotion of their business or car collection (or whatever). However, with high res digital files there is nothing (other than a legal document) stopping them from selling prints or even just selling the digital image.

For this reason it is important to have an acceptable use license that makes it clear that you still own the copyright and clearly defines what they are allowed to do with the image.

i give full resolution jpeg images to customers. not the raw file ever.
in my contract is also stated that ownership of the pictures is mine . they can share and print as they like. but no comercial use is permited without permission.


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djtwigsta
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Feb 10, 2014 16:34 |  #13

I am in this position now also however the client would like to print the photos for business use (cards/flyers/backdrop​s/etc.)... What do you use for an agreement? I would still want it stated they cannot sell the photos themselves as prints in bulk etc.


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Individual Hi-Res File Pricing
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