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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
Thread started 20 Oct 2011 (Thursday) 10:57
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Ready to throw in the towel...

 
Shockey
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Oct 20, 2011 12:50 |  #31

On your sample bring your exposure up just a tick and you are done his eyes are fine, 5 seconds max.
Do not brighten eyes and teeth, waste of time. Only clean up MAJOR blemishes unless the shot is just a headshot then more may be required.

You are overworking your shots.

Take them in jpeg, get your settings how you like them in cameras regarding sharpening and contrast. Shoot Auto white balance, it will normally be right or very close.

Process in Lightroom. Use Auto Sync to adjust exposure as necessary for groups of photos with similar lighting. Go through them quickly and adjust crop if necessary, keep cloning to a minimum...I very seldom to any cloning.....people just don't notice that stuff.

Do a universal sharpening on all of them at once.

Export. Done.

Using this process my average processing time is 100 photos per hour.

99 percent of my photos are processed completely in Lightroom, a few get extra skin processing and a few go to Photoshop for more work.

Of course this is portraits.......landsc​apes are a LOT more work.


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Mommalyze
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Oct 20, 2011 13:40 |  #32

I am feeling the same way and I just bought a PowerShot SX130IS. It has the nice zoom and some creative power for you but not as bulky as the SLR. I don't think you can save images or video in raw file. It has 720HD video and that is about all I can remember about it off hand. The size is not too small but not as big and bulky as the SLR. It doesn't need a big bag, but would fit in a little case in your purse.
It may be coming on clearance as there is a newer model out now.




  
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D ­ Thompson
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Oct 20, 2011 14:18 as a reply to  @ post 13279812 |  #33

This took about 2 minutes only using ACR. Of course, the RAW would've been better to work with. Only thing done in PS was resize and save for web.


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HappySnapper90
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Oct 20, 2011 14:27 |  #34

Amamba wrote in post #13279504 (external link)
at 10 minutes average per photo - which is probably too optimistic - that's 5 - 6 straight hours of work.

Amamba wrote in post #13279693 (external link)
Well, here's what I do on a typical portrait.

1. Adjust white balance and some exposure adjustment in DPP. 1-2 min.

2. Transfer to PS. 1 min at least (it's not fast).

So, what part of the process should I NOT be doing out of camera ?

Ok, it sounds like you are doing too much using a slow interface. 10 minutes per photo is too much. DPP is a limited, cumbersome photo program and it would seem like Photoshop is too much of a program for you. And if you are limited with time you probably should not be running filters to smooth people's skin out!

Consider getting Lightroom 3. You can probably find it for $150 now and again on sale and it might be discounted even more on Black Friday. If you have a kid in school you might be able to qualify for the Student version that is about $90.

With Lightroom you will be able to easily copy RAW adjustment settings from one photo to as many photos as you want in a couple of seconds. No more adjusting the WB of every photo individually in DPP then exporting to a different program. Use Lightroom alone for your photo work where you never open or close a photo just move from one to the next without and "open" or "close" command. If your lighting in your photos is relatively constant copying the settings from one photo might work for all the other photos. This could make your time go from 5 hours of developing time down to 15 minutes.

If you are limited with time, don't try to super fine tune every single image. Find a happy medium.




  
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Maureen ­ Souza
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Oct 20, 2011 14:29 |  #35

Personally, I hate to shoot RAW and love jpg. I use Manual exposure and try to get it right the first time. I take a lot of photos but only process about 1/2 of them and toss the rest. Quality over quantity :)


Life is hard...but I just take it one photograph at a time.

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HappySnapper90
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Oct 20, 2011 14:30 |  #36

Amamba wrote in post #13279767 (external link)
However there are some things that need fixing even if I don't want to do much work. His eyes are too dark, an there needs to be some sharpening. Unfortunately, most other photos aren't even there.

His eyes are not too dark, they are fine given the context of the entire image. Is your computer screen calibrated for color, brightness, and contrast? Again it sounds like you are trying to do so much with each photo (brightening parts) when you have many photos to do. Choose your battles.

With Lightroom you can easily set sharpening to be done upon export to a JPG file. I never apply sharpening as a RAW conversion setting. What Lightroom does for sharpening during output is just fine especially for family snapshots like you have.




  
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AlligatorEditor
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Oct 20, 2011 14:43 |  #37

Rolfe D. Wolfe wrote in post #13279487 (external link)
A DSLR in green box mode is still 100x better then a P*s in auto mode...

That's what I was thinking...


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HappySnapper90
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Oct 20, 2011 14:46 |  #38

AlligatorEditor wrote in post #13280408 (external link)
That's what I was thinking...

Not really since it would be using the flash and ISO 400 instead of using a higher ISO. It will also give results that look like a P&S due to using f4.5 to f8 in many situations.




  
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Daedalus34r
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Oct 20, 2011 14:54 |  #39

OP are you taking each image in photoshop and heavily working on them?

My version of PP is Adobe Lightroom and post processing takes like 1min / photo. You get faster and faster at it the more you use it. Quickly you can figure out what the photo needs to get it to be where you want.

I understand the lack of time frustration, maybe you need to reduce the scale of work required, as in pick only the best FEW from the set instead of all photos that are above average.


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ssim
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Oct 20, 2011 15:01 |  #40

Numenorean wrote in post #13279276 (external link)
You are the only one that can answer your question.

What he said


My life is like one big RAW file....way too much post processing needed.
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guitarfish
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Oct 20, 2011 15:09 |  #41

I came from the opposite camp, I had a pretty high end P&S (at the time when the Canon PowerShot S5 IS was their most advanced). Indoor/low light pics were almost always blurry. In retrospect an external flash would've helped with that. The best pics were outside in sunshine, but how often can you depend on that? Motion was always an issue.

With a DSLR (first the T1i, now the 60D) an can take a pic of just about anything and be pretty confident it's going to be something I can work with.

I shoot in RAW, and open those with PhotoShop Elements. If I had to do it over again, I would probably have opted for Lightroom. In any case, I spend about 1-2 min on a picture in PSE. My steps are open it, almost always accept the white balance as shot, crop it, quick adjust of contrast, highlights and dark areas. Adjust color saturation if needed. Every now and then I may need to select a portion of a photo and (eg a bright background) and adjust it in line with the foreground. Finally, sharpen, and save as a JPG. 1-2 min tops.

Switching to a P&S may not be the be all end all.




  
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MT ­ Stringer
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Oct 20, 2011 15:18 |  #42

I skimmed through the thread so it looks like you have Photoshop, which I can't help you with. I use Photoshop Elements for more tedious stuff like resizing, adding borders, text and other stuff.

However, I use Lightroom for almost all of my post processing. Others have mentioned their workflow and that is very similar to what I do. Nothing fancy or time consuming.

1) Upload pics to computer.
2) Go through them using Breeze browser Pro and delete the non-keepers.
3) Import them into Lightroom 3 using "General Auto Tone".
4) Go to the first image. Make adjustments that you want to make globally to all images including crop, sharpness, contrast, exposure, white balance (if needed), sharpeness and noise reduction.
5) Then select all, click Sync and check the boxes for each adjustment you want to make to all of your images. Click OK and VOILA! Instantly all of your images have been adjusted.
6) Next thing I do is go through them and straighten the horizons (I am bad about that when shooting on a monopod). That is easy and fast using the crop tool in edit mode.
7) Adjust your crop to improve composition.
8) Adjust anything else that needs it.

I know this sound time consuming but it really isn't. I shoot a lot of sports and do this all the time.
When you are through, export your images to a different folder than the original. Your original images will still be intact with no changes made to them.

Download the trial version of Lightroom 3 and give it the 21 day free trial. I think you will like it.
Hope this helps.
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randy98mtu
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Oct 20, 2011 15:20 |  #43

You can get plugins to add borders and lots of other things in your batch export. I use Mogrify. Works very well.


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AlligatorEditor
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Oct 20, 2011 17:05 |  #44

HappySnapper90 wrote in post #13280423 (external link)
Not really since it would be using the flash and ISO 400 instead of using a higher ISO. It will also give results that look like a P&S due to using f4.5 to f8 in many situations.

Ah, I didn't specify that any time I use auto it's auto-without-flash. But in situations where I've needed to get a shot quickly and didn't have time to get my settings straight, I've put the camera in auto-without-flash mode and gotten photos I like MUCH better than anything I've ever gotten out of a point and shoot. If money were important, I can see selling gear for a P&S if all you care about is convenience, but as long as I could afford to keep a DSLR, I'd use that in auto over a P&S.

As far as editing, half the time if I'm just looking for Facebook-posting-worthy edits to pictures from some activity, all I do is auto-levels in Photoshop, which fixes most of my problems. 10 seconds if that per photo.

But if OP isn't enjoying his DSLR, why keep it, I suppose.


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Retouch ­ UK
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Oct 20, 2011 17:17 as a reply to  @ AlligatorEditor's post |  #45

+1 for lightroom

I use it for the majority of my photos. The only time I go into PS is if I am trying to do any major editing work or if the pictures are for someone and I want to make sure they are perfect. In these cases like you I will spend 10 mins+ per photo. In Lightroom all my pics get exposure, colour balance and levels adjusted. I spend roughly 10 seconds per photo max to make those adjustments.

Its great as a catalogue too for looking through the photos

I am interested in what some people have been saying about applying setings to other photos once one is done. I didnt realise you could do that. I do mine individually. Il have to have a play when I get home.




  
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