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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 04 Nov 2011 (Friday) 15:35
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Noobie advice on tamron vs canon lens.

 
Sp1207
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Nov 04, 2011 16:17 |  #16

There is no hard or fast rule. Compare on a lens by lens basis to get worthwhile feedback.


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M3 ­ Andy
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Nov 04, 2011 16:18 |  #17

right ok mate. wow alot to take in but will have a think about what i will really need it for.

thanks.


Canon 60D, 17-85 is usm lens, 50mm 1.4 lens, 70-300 tamron lens, 430ii speed lite and afew other stuff.

  
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Kirill
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Nov 04, 2011 16:19 |  #18

Canon EF mount protocol is proprietary - Tamron and Sigma had to reverse engineer it - as result their focusing process is their own interpretation of Canon's spec - and their lenses may or may not provide you with sharp pictures if you use Auto Focus.




  
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paddler4
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Nov 04, 2011 16:29 |  #19

So i should really stick to the canon range and if my budget allows me go for the l series lens?

No. The best advice is in a few of the posts above: compare on a per lens basis. The quality of both Canon and non-Canon lenses varies. And no, you certainly don't need to stick with the L series. E.g., the one Tamron I have, which I love, is the 28-75 f/2.8. It lack some features of the Canon competitor, but is a very good lens, weighs less, and costs 1/3 as much. The difference in price was more than enough to buy me another (Canon, no-L) lens.


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FEChariot
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Nov 04, 2011 16:34 as a reply to  @ paddler4's post |  #20

Tamron zoom and focus rings turn the Nikon way which is opposite to Canon. This will make MF when doing video confusing. Sigma rings turn the Canon way.


Canon 7D/350D, Σ17-50/2.8 OS, 18-55IS, 24-105/4 L IS, Σ30/1.4 EX, 50/1.8, C50/1.4, 55-250IS, 60/2.8, 70-200/4 L IS, 85/1.8, 100/2.8 IS L, 135/2 L 580EX II, 430EX II * 2, 270EX II.

  
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Sirrith
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Nov 04, 2011 16:41 |  #21

FEChariot wrote in post #13354777 (external link)
Sigma rings turn the Canon way.

Not all of them. Some turn the nikon way. Sigma is quirky like that :)


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Frugal
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Nov 04, 2011 16:53 as a reply to  @ Sirrith's post |  #22

Sirrith gave you the best information: i

The best thing to do is this:
Decide what you need from a new lens. Once you settle on that, decide what focal length/aperture you need from a lens. Then look at all the potential offerings from all the different manufacturers. Then look at reviews and pictures from all those lenses, and then price, and then decide which best fits your needs.
For example, if you need a fast walkaround zoom lens with stabiliser, you have the choice between the tamron 17-50 VC, the sigma 17-50 OS, and the canon 17-55 IS.

The tamron and sigma are around the same price. The sigma produces better IQ, so the tamron is usually out for most people. The canon beats the sigma in sharpness at the edge of the frame, but loses out in the centre. The sigma is smaller and lighter than the canon, and includes a hood and has a much longer warranty. The canon has faster focus and full time manual focus. The sigma has better flare resistance. The canon is a bit longer. The sigma has better build quality. The canon costs around $450 more. Based on this process, you can decide which of these lenses best suits your needs and budget, instead of thinking "canon makes the best lenses, I will only look at canon."


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redflash
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Nov 04, 2011 16:59 |  #23

yeah, that!

I've found using this forum, once you've decided on a lens, or a length - do a search for that lens, eg Canon xx-xxx zoom and there will be a thread discussing the good/bad/ugly about that particular lens, as well as alternatives. Alternatives may be tamron, sigma, L, or even similar length lenses in the Canon or other range which do a better job.

Enjoy looking around, this forum IMO is probably the best source of information and lens reviews from people who have actually used them.


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carcrafter22
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Nov 04, 2011 17:31 |  #24

crn3371 wrote in post #13354632 (external link)
With the third party lenses I think you're better off comparing on a per lens basis. Some third party lenses are every bit as good as their Canon counterparts.

I agree! With that said, I have had a couple third party lenses and have since chosen to go with nothing but canon lenses, specificly L lenses (apart from my 15-85.) they are just better built, faster to focus and much much sharper in my experience so far and I'd rather spend my money once.


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harcosparky
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Nov 04, 2011 18:56 |  #25

I am old man and I can tell you from personal experience that focusing a Tamron lens just after using a Canon lens or focusing a Canon lens just after using a Tamron lens is not an issue.

I own a mix of Canon and Tamron lenses, and to be honest I never noticed it enough to consider it mentionable.

What I did do was look at one lens from Canon, say the 180mm Macro lens, and compare it to Tamrons counterpart. Both resulted in stunning images,than it comes down to cost vs benefit.

Both seemed to benefit me equally, so cost was the deciding factor.

Canon: ~$1,500.00
Tamron: ~$690.00

I chose the Tamron, and spent the money saved from doing so on a nice Canon Macro Flash unit, the MT-24EX

That's my experience .... cannot say it enough, you need to determine your *needs* and choose according to your needs and means.




  
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BrickR
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Nov 04, 2011 19:03 |  #26

harcosparky wrote in post #13355419 (external link)
I am old man and I can tell you from personal experience that focusing a Tamron lens just after using a Canon lens or focusing a Canon lens just after using a Tamron lens is not an issue.

I own a mix of Canon and Tamron lenses, and to be honest I never noticed it enough to consider it mentionable.

What I did do was look at one lens from Canon, say the 180mm Macro lens, and compare it to Tamrons counterpart. Both resulted in stunning images,than it comes down to cost vs benefit.

Both seemed to benefit me equally, so cost was the deciding factor.

Canon: ~$1,500.00
Tamron: ~$690.00

I chose the Tamron, and spent the money saved from doing so on a nice Canon Macro Flash unit, the MT-24EX

That's my experience .... cannot say it enough, you need to determine your *needs* and choose according to your needs and means.

Perfect example sir.


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Snydremark
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Nov 04, 2011 19:07 |  #27

M3 Andy wrote in post #13354619 (external link)
Thanks for that. So i should really stick to the canon range and if my budget allows me go for the l series lens?

Learn exposure, how to best frame your subjects and learn what you need your lenses to do; from there, determine what features you need/want and evaluate your purchases from there. There very well may be cases where you are NOT best served by an 'L' lens.

If you've only just gotten into this, money is not the thing to throw at learning. Taking the time to use the gear you have, properly, and learning what/how to shoot is going to do you more good than just buying expensive toys.

Don't get me wrong, the expensive toys are nice! :D But they aren't necessarily your answer to better photography.


- Eric S.: My Birds/Wildlife (external link) (7D MkII/5D IV, Canon 10-22 f/3.5-4.5, Canon 24-105L f/4 IS, Canon 70-200L f/2.8 IS MkII, Canon 100-400L f/4.5-5.6 IS I/II)
"The easiest way to improve your photos is to adjust the loose nut between the shutter release and the ground."

  
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jrbdmb
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Nov 04, 2011 19:22 |  #28

I was about to say "Canon is typically a safe choice," but even this is not always true. And going for the Canon L is not always the safe or best choice. For instance, there have been build and durability issues with the Canon EF-S 17-85mm IS zoom and the 50mm 1.4 lens. And though the Canon 85mm 1.2L is great, it is not the choice for fast action due to its slow autofocus.

As said above, start by learning with what you have and from there figure out which lenses are working for you and which need to be replaced. IMHO first start with the Canon options, but be sure to look at third party lenses as well. Good luck!


Tools: 70D, 10-22, Tamron 24-70 VC, 70-300L, 135 f2L

  
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wayne.robbins
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Nov 04, 2011 19:28 |  #29

Not to dispute but there is a lot of bad info in this thread; opinions, yes, facts ? - not really- maybe justification, but not necessarily facts.

JeffreyG wrote in post #13354654 (external link)
3rd party lenses all focus and zoom backwards in my experience, so I don't use them. I dislike having lenses that do not operate the same way.

Not true.. While some may be backwards, every 3rd party lens I have works just like the Canon's do.

[QUOTE=jay4prez;133545​95]well, build quality and compability are 2 of the main ones, then theres price, canon lens will always work with your canon camera unless theres a defect.

Third Party lens often reverse-engineer the lens controlling software, so they may not always work without the lens being re-chipped, and sometimes esp with the older lens, they do not work at all....(with the newer cameras)
QUOTE]
Right. Some 3rd party lenses are built better than their Canon counterparts.. Some are even regarded as being better. The rest of it is generally OVER hyped!
QC is an issue for every manufacturer, including Canon. Look for the threads where someone had to send their L lens in for service, multiple times, because it didn't work right on their Canon camera in the first place! All of the brands have minimal QC in place, and all have issues here and there. Overhyped to an extreme on the forums though.. Take opinions with a grain of salt!

Stir Fry A Lot wrote in post #13354560 (external link)
Autofocus speed and accuracy.

A lot of the thrid party lenses are just as accurate and speedy. Some aren't, including some Canon lenses.

EOSBoy wrote in post #13354550 (external link)
Quality control and resale value. If you dive into Canon's L lenses, optics are also better, imo.

False, true, and is it worth it, in the long run. Also diving into the L lens lineup may also help empty your bank account. Quality control has been mostly replaced by tighter tolerances in manufacturing, and by depending upon the customer to determine if there is a problem with the lens in the end. This is how most mass produced commodities work as far as QC is concerned- it's really no longer QC- just react to customer's satisfaction/dissatisf​action. Period. The questions you need to ask- are you buying the lens with the intent of reselling it in the future, and is it worth paying the premium to have Canon's glass or even Canon's L glass. Only you can answer those questions.
You will find a lot of opinionated souls that believe that 3rd party glass is sometimes Good to Excellent, and even sometimes BETTER than the Canon equivalent. And there are the purists that believe that the only lens worth buying has to say Canon on the label- and then the extremists that believe that if it is "L" then its automatically worth the extra cost. Best practice is to evaluate each lens on a case by case basis- while considering your own personal needs. Period.


EOS 5D III, EOS 7D,EOS Rebel T4i, Canon 70-200 f/2.8 IS II, Canon 24-105L, Canon 18-135 IS STM, 1.4x TC III, 2.0x TC III, Σ 50mm f/1.4, Σ 17-50 OS, Σ 70-200 OS, Σ 50-500 OS, Σ 1.4x TC, Σ 2.0x TC, 580EXII(3), Canon SX-40, Canon S100
Fond memories: Rebel T1i, Canon 18-55 IS, Canon 55-250 IS, 18-135 IS (Given to a good home)...

  
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Snydremark
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Nov 04, 2011 19:43 |  #30

wayne.robbins wrote in post #13355514 (external link)
...Also diving into the L lens lineup will also help empty your bank account. ...

Fixed that for you ;)


- Eric S.: My Birds/Wildlife (external link) (7D MkII/5D IV, Canon 10-22 f/3.5-4.5, Canon 24-105L f/4 IS, Canon 70-200L f/2.8 IS MkII, Canon 100-400L f/4.5-5.6 IS I/II)
"The easiest way to improve your photos is to adjust the loose nut between the shutter release and the ground."

  
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