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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 03 Dec 2011 (Saturday) 05:17
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POLL: "Is the 35mm 2.0 or the 50mm 1.4 better in low light?"
35mm f/2
12
30.8%
50mm f/1.4
27
69.2%

39 voters, 39 votes given (1 choice only choices can be voted per member)). VOTING IS FOR MEMBERS ONLY.
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Is the 35mm 2.0 or the 50mm 1.4 better in low light in your experience?

 
kf095
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Dec 04, 2011 18:34 |  #46

I find 50mn to be almost useless on my T1i. Way too narrow even for outdoors.
Flash and Rebel kit lens will outperform 50 1.4 no flash in low light.
24-105, 18-55 and flash will do.
This is 35mm F4 and flash in total darkness..

IMAGE: https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-eJNnpik4jA8/Tl2iKq5xB4I/AAAAAAAAW8c/uBnFLTU7vvM/s800/_MG_1262.jpg

If you want ambient light to be present increase ISO and decrease flashlight power.

IMAGE: https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-bGQlt2xyPKY/TmgajlohpFI/AAAAAAAAXEc/GEJwKR7uNTU/s800/_MG_3495.jpg
F9, ISO400, 30mm. Flash compensation pushed to the left.

Old Site (external link). M-E and ME blog (external link). Film Flickr (external link). my DigitaL and AnaLog Gear.

  
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Ashura
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117 posts
Joined Sep 2010
     
Dec 05, 2011 08:11 |  #47

The second picture is, IMO, very unflattering.
The perspective of the 30 makes her nose look huge, and the flash makes every skin defect very apparent.
I would have used my 50, stepped back a bit, used a 2.0 aperture or so, and pushed ISO enough to get sufficient shutter speed. The picture would maybe have been a bit noisy, but with a lot more atmosphere.


flickr (external link)
50D, EF 24-105/4 L, EF 50/1.4, EF 35/2.0, EF-S 10-22/3.5-4.5, 430EX, D-Lite 4 It kit

  
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artyH
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Joined Aug 2009
     
Dec 05, 2011 09:11 |  #48

The difference in maximum aperture doesn't mean as much as you might think. It is usually OK to hold the 35 at 1/60 and the 50mm lens requires at least 1/80 to avoid the effects of hand movement while holding the lens. Also, many people don't want to shoot the 50 at f1.4, since their copies are a little soft there. Mine is pretty good at f1.4, but indoors, I like larger f stops with the 50 - like f1.8 to increase depth of field. Even if you want to shoot the 50 at f1.4, the difference is not a full stop, because of the need for most people for higher shutte speeds with the 50.
Focal length does matter here. The 50 is now in a lens case, but often winds up on a second body, while the camera I often reach for has the 35 on it.
My answer to the original question is still that they are both very good in low light, but I use my 35f2 more.
Now, the 35f1.4 - that is a different issue entirely.




  
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uneek78
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Dec 05, 2011 10:11 |  #49

artyH wrote in post #13497484 (external link)
The difference in maximum aperture doesn't mean as much as you might think. It is usually OK to hold the 35 at 1/60 and the 50mm lens requires at least 1/80 to avoid the effects of hand movement while holding the lens. Also, many people don't want to shoot the 50 at f1.4, since their copies are a little soft there. Mine is pretty good at f1.4, but indoors, I like larger f stops with the 50 - like f1.8 to increase depth of field. Even if you want to shoot the 50 at f1.4, the difference is not a full stop, because of the need for most people for higher shutte speeds with the 50.
Focal length does matter here. The 50 is now in a lens case, but often winds up on a second body, while the camera I often reach for has the 35 on it.
My answer to the original question is still that they are both very good in low light, but I use my 35f2 more.
Now, the 35f1.4 - that is a different issue entirely.

What is the different issue with the 35mm 1.4 ArtyH?


Gerard Payne | www.gerardpayne.com (external link)
Canon Rebel T1i | Canon 50mm f/1.4 | Canon 24-105L |Canon 55-250mm f/4-5.6

  
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Is the 35mm 2.0 or the 50mm 1.4 better in low light in your experience?
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