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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
Thread started 20 Dec 2011 (Tuesday) 04:00
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Dust

 
rick_reno
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Dec 26, 2011 10:10 |  #16

AndersH wrote in post #13599918 (external link)
It cost $90, and yeah i know - it's a lot of money, but I didn't want to risk anything this close to the trip.
I don't know how they cleaned it, but it's pretty clean though. I do plan to bring a small bulb blower on the trip :)

If you're flying, you might want to pack that blower in with your checked luggage. For some reason TSA likes to take them away.




  
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ejenner
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Dec 26, 2011 12:47 |  #17

AndersH wrote in post #13599918 (external link)
It cost $90, and yeah i know - it's a lot of money, but I didn't want to risk anything this close to the trip.

That was probably a good decision. getting sensors clean can be very frustrating and it is very likely you will get it more dirty first. With the extra stress the chances of doing something silly and damaging the sensor are much higher.

Although we cleans were mentioned and are effective, I would do as much dry cleaning first.

I haven't used compressed air, but I too can't believe it will damage the sensor is you are careful and check that it is not too powerful. After all when wet cleaning you can press reasonably hard - it's not super fragile. My guess is that the biggest problem will be extracting all the dust in the crevices around the sensor and depositing it on the sensor.


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Nicholas ­ R.
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Dec 26, 2011 13:00 |  #18

ejenner wrote in post #13600759 (external link)
That was probably a good decision. getting sensors clean can be very frustrating and it is very likely you will get it more dirty first. With the extra stress the chances of doing something silly and damaging the sensor are much higher.

Although we cleans were mentioned and are effective, I would do as much dry cleaning first.

I haven't used compressed air, but I too can't believe it will damage the sensor is you are careful and check that it is not too powerful. After all when wet cleaning you can press reasonably hard - it's not super fragile. My guess is that the biggest problem will be extracting all the dust in the crevices around the sensor and depositing it on the sensor.

ejenner,

As discussed earlier, going in "willy-nilly" with compressed-air or any other sensor cleaning tool may lead to problems, so it is NOT for the faint-of-heart. But the shear numbers of photographers who do self-clean their sensors is incredibly high. Each person must decide for himself if he is up for the job.

Anders made a decision and it cost him aplenty in dollars, but if he got a reasonably clean sensor by hire and kept his sanity (peace-of-mind), then that's fine. $90 for ten minutes work is a pretty good living I'd say, seeing as a couple of swabs may have cost the shop no more than $10. For half of that one can get a wet/dry kit that will last for years; use the brush or pen everyday and the wet tools maybe once or twice a month. The beauty of this type of kit is that the dry tools are perfect for cleaning up what the wet cleaning leaves behind.

Regards,
Nicholas




  
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AndersH
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Dec 27, 2011 05:32 |  #19

rick_reno wrote in post #13600215 (external link)
If you're flying, you might want to pack that blower in with your checked luggage. For some reason TSA likes to take them away.

Thanks for the advise, won't be going to the states this time though - but plan to go for a road trip in Cali sometime next summer.

ejenner wrote in post #13600759 (external link)
That was probably a good decision. getting sensors clean can be very frustrating and it is very likely you will get it more dirty first. With the extra stress the chances of doing something silly and damaging the sensor are much higher.

That was exactly my thought. I haven't done it before, and I didn't want to risk damaging anything.

Nicholas R. wrote in post #13600802 (external link)
Anders made a decision and it cost him aplenty in dollars, but if he got a reasonably clean sensor by hire and kept his sanity (peace-of-mind), then that's fine. $90 for ten minutes work is a pretty good living I'd say, seeing as a couple of swabs may have cost the shop no more than $10. For half of that one can get a wet/dry kit that will last for years; use the brush or pen everyday and the wet tools maybe once or twice a month. The beauty of this type of kit is that the dry tools are perfect for cleaning up what the wet cleaning leaves behind.

It probably didn't cost them much, but in this case, I really feel the cost was worth it, as it really gave me peace not thinking about having to photoshop three months worth of pictures.
I'm not sure how I will it done in the future, the risk of damaging either of my cameras would be a damn shame and pretty expensive for me. I might buy an old 350D or 400D, just for the practice, they seem to go pretty cheap around here sometimes.


Best Regards, Anders Hansen;
Canon EOS 50D & 5DC + 24-105mmL f/4.0 & 50mm f/1.8.

  
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Lowner
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Dec 27, 2011 06:54 |  #20

Canned air works well for me. I've never wet cleaned and I have no intention of ever doing so.


Richard

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Nicholas ­ R.
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Dec 27, 2011 07:10 as a reply to  @ Lowner's post |  #21

Everyone has their own threshold of FUD as evidenced by this thread, so each personal decision is appropriate. Canned-air does work great and is absolutely safe no matter what the FUDsters say.
Anders did not want to risk damaging his sensor so he chose to pay someone else to do it. Hopefully he got a super-clean sensor because many of these high-priced camera shops shoot blanks. You're spinning the roulette wheel even when you send it in to Canon for cleaning - some techs know what they're doing while others are inept.

All of that being said, the vast majority of professionals cannot afford to be without their cameras everytime dust becomes an issue, and as noted above, once they've paid for the service only to be greatly disappointed by the results. they indeed become highly reluctant to repeat the expensive fiasco.

If your photography is just a hobby and sensor dust doesn't bother you, it makes perfect sense to not worry about it. But pros or semi-pros who especially shoot landscapes, macro or portraits MUST take matters into their own hands.

Nicholas
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Preeb
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Dec 27, 2011 10:56 |  #22

rick_reno wrote in post #13600215 (external link)
If you're flying, you might want to pack that blower in with your checked luggage. For some reason TSA likes to take them away.

Really? I've taken several trips with it, domestic and international, and never had it questioned. I have all of my photo gear in a Swiss Gear backpack that holds my 17" laptop too. The only thing I've ever done is the standard requirement of removing the laptop from the pack and sending it through alone.


Rick
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Bruce ­ Foreman
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Dec 27, 2011 20:32 |  #23

ejenner wrote in post #13600759 (external link)
Although wet cleans were mentioned and are effective, I would do as much dry cleaning first.

My T2i came from the factory with an extremely generous layer of dust across the sensor. The Giottos Rocket Blower didn't touch it and after seeing the extent of the layer of dust with a lighted sensor loupe it took me almost 48 hours to work up the courage to get in there with wet swabs.

It actually took 2 swabs (4 passes total following instructions to the letter) and about 4 - 5 minutes to do it and that took care of it.

Scared me half to death that first time.

ejenner wrote in post #13600759 (external link)
I haven't used compressed air, but I too can't believe it will damage the sensor if you are careful and check that it is not too powerful. After all when wet cleaning you can press reasonably hard - it's not super fragile. My guess is that the biggest problem will be extracting all the dust in the crevices around the sensor and depositing it on the sensor.

If any of the propellant is not cleared from the nozzle it may tend to go "everywhere", including under the OLPF (optical low pass filter) layer in front of the sensor. Once that has happened you will likely never get a completely sharp image after that. And there is no "removing" the OLPF to clean it out.

The last lab I worked in had compressed air from a central system available in every room. Moisture condensation got into the hoses and we had to "clear" it well before using the air on negatives, glass, lenses, film holders or whatever.

I don't care what Canon techs use, and to me it doesn't matter who has used canned air for hundreds of times with nothing bad. It's that 428th time that it does happen that will ruin someone's day.

I use a sensor loupe so I can see exactly what is on that OLPF, I try "dry" (Giottos Rocket Blower then the "Brush-Off" from Photographic Solutions) methods first and if that doesn't get it then I do a wet cleaning with Visible Dust swabs and solutions. Being able to inspect with a lighted sensor loupe lets me see exactly what I have to deal with.




  
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Nicholas ­ R.
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Dec 28, 2011 08:05 |  #24

Bruce Foreman wrote in post #13607341 (external link)
If any of the propellant is not cleared from the nozzle it may tend to go "everywhere", including under the OLPF (optical low pass filter) layer in front of the sensor. Once that has happened you will likely never get a completely sharp image after that. And there is no "removing" the OLPF to clean it out.

The last lab I worked in had compressed air from a central system available in every room. Moisture condensation got into the hoses and we had to "clear" it well before using the air on negatives, glass, lenses, film holders or whatever.

I don't care what Canon techs use, and to me it doesn't matter who has used canned air for hundreds of times with nothing bad. It's that 428th time that it does happen that will ruin someone's day.

Bruce,

You have charted your own protocol when it comes to cleaning your sensor and that is as it should be. But as far as canned-air goes, the guidelines previously posted are sufficient to avoid any liquid release. We use Tech-Spray Duster here and the directions say to "clear valve before using on photographic negatives".

Your opinion that the propellant will act like a corrosive on the sensor's surface is not quite accurate. It is not like sulfuric or muriatic acid but it is classified as a "refrigerant" which technically could cause frostbite of the skin if a sufficient quantity came into contact. It is definitely a tool you wouldn't allow a child to use but it has been around a long time.

In my early days of photography, I accidentally got propellant on a couple of lenses, but it came right off and caused no damage to the coatings. In ten years of sensor cleaning, I have yet to read about ONE case of anyone destroying a cut-filter with canned-air propellant or anyone getting it under the filter. I believe people are just "assuming" the chemical reaction that takes place on the skin will similarly "freeze" and/or corrode an optic-coated glass. I am not a chemist but I personally know several photographers using their D-SLRs in -40 degree Antarctica, so lenses and sensors and their coatings are incredibly freeze-resistant.

Nicholas
www.copperhillimages.c​om (external link)




  
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