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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Glamour & Nude Talk 
Thread started 30 Dec 2011 (Friday) 22:15
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How do you handle when you don't like the way a shot came out, and your client does?

 
abacus022
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Dec 30, 2011 22:15 |  #1

Recently I had a photoshoot for a client. The first few shots were considerably overexposed. I corrected the lighting, then continued. The rest was fine. But the first poses did not come out the way I had envisioned.

I was able to sort of salvage them, but I am not pleased with the outcome. I had an inclination to just delete them. But I didn't. I gave them to the client along with the others. I did tell them, however, that I was not pleased with the way they came out.

They went ahead and posted them on a social networking site, along with the good ones. Of course, all the best comments come from the crappy ones. The concept was good, and powerful. But from a technical standpoint they just don't work in my opinion. I hate having my name attached to those.

So what would you do?


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FlyingPhotog
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Dec 30, 2011 22:18 |  #2

Say Thank You and cash the check (quickly)

Remember where you think you failed and adjust accordingly next time.


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abacus022
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Dec 30, 2011 22:49 |  #3

I suppose. I mean, I did for sure. I just feel like I didn't deliver the product that I could have.

I almost want to ask them to let me re-shoot that series. But they are so happy with the originals. I think because of the concept itself.


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FlyingPhotog
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Dec 30, 2011 23:02 |  #4

Why admit failure? Move on... ;)


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abacus022
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Dec 30, 2011 23:13 |  #5

ego?


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FlyingPhotog
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Dec 31, 2011 03:49 |  #6

Ego? Hell no...

Serendipity? Yeah kinda...

You screwed up in reverse and gave the client something cool that they didn't even know they wanted. In some foreign countries, you'd be hailed as an avante garde genius. Don't over anylize it. :lol:


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abacus022
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Dec 31, 2011 12:32 |  #7

But see, that's the thing. Technically, it's flawed. There are blown highlights that I think look atrocious. Using Lightroom, I used recovery to mitigate it, but there's lots of skin detail on the arm and shoulder that is lost. It looks harsh and just plain wrong.

Plus I didn't get the bokeh I was aiming for either, but that's a lessor issue.

But they like the pose. I get that, and I appreciate that.

But I seriously would rather do the pose over again, and not screw up the lighting this time. It would be so much better.


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tfiorda
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Dec 31, 2011 21:18 |  #8

Your error was in showing them less than standard work. I may shoot 50 images for a client but I'll go over them and only show them 30 or so. Of course I've set up with the client the number of images they may see and if I get questions on the 'others' I tell them the if I didn't like them, they wouldn't either and stand my ground. Set their expecations early and stand by your convictions! Otherwise, cash the check and do better next time!




  
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Tigran
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Jan 01, 2012 23:30 |  #9

Did you ask the client what it is that they like about the pictures? They may like how the pictures turned out -- including the look from being overexposed. If it is the poses they like, you can suggest redoing those same poses again with different lighting ideas you have. Then if they still prefer the originals over the redone shots, say, "Thank you, I'm happy you're pleased with my work. I hope you'll consider me for your next assignment." Remember the old adage, "The client is always right."

If you push too hard on this because of your "ego" you may simply alienate the client -- who right now, is happy.




  
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Absolutely ­ Fabulous
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Jan 01, 2012 23:35 |  #10

don't give a file your not proud of, it will come back to haunt you.

in this case client was happy, so drop it. I know a lot of folks who cringe and do the selective colour then cash the cheque and try to forget..... it's their product at the end of the day, but best to not show stuff you're not proud of


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alexcaro
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Jan 01, 2012 23:45 |  #11

It must not have been as awful as you thought if you included it in their package. We all have a different eye on what art is, we will not all like the same style or pp style that others might. If they are happy they you've done your job.


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Jan 02, 2012 06:19 as a reply to  @ alexcaro's post |  #12

I will never give a client something that I would not want posted online.

my way of doing things is to upload a private gallery of all the images straight from camera or what I will normally do is do a batch process of basic adjustments, taking out any test shots/misfires
I will use a flash gallery normally so that images can't be saved from the internet.

then I ask the client to choose their favourites for me to fully edit.

this way the client get's their favourite photos and you get to edit them as needed, which gives you a greater advantage knowing that they may post one you're not happy with online and it gives you more of a chance to salvage the shot.


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stanclark
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Jan 04, 2012 22:41 |  #13

once your client takes them.....suck it up....chalk it off to experience... bank the check....just be more careful in the future....never let it get to you....and never put your name on the front of a bad image.


So if God made Man & Woman....whats his excuse for Nikon...

  
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Ledrak
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Jan 06, 2012 23:54 |  #14

Sometimes we're our own worst critics. I did a shoot a while back where I felt nearly all of the pics turned out to be total trash that was beyond salvaging, so I shelved the entire set. I went back to it months later and played around with some of the shots again, and ended up with what I feel is (believe it or not) one of the better shots I've ever taken... from that set that I thought was trash. So sometimes something as simple as a fresh set of eyes can change your perspective. You never know.




  
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Jan 07, 2012 09:46 |  #15

Back when I shot sports almost exclusively I had the occasional bad shot that was slightly over exposed and white balance was off. But from a composition stand point it was quite good. Every now and than one of the bad pics would make it online for viewing and sure enough, they sold as well as the better ones.
From a photographers stand point it makes you cringe when you think a bad image is out there being shown around you are responsible for but nonetheless the money spends the same. Just try to be more careful in what the client sees in the future is all you can do.


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How do you handle when you don't like the way a shot came out, and your client does?
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