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Thread started 13 Jan 2012 (Friday) 15:12
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First attempt at lighting

 
Seventeen ­ Nineteen
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Jan 13, 2012 15:12 |  #1

I just got a 430EX II. I had some fun playing with it today. I've used a diffuser and mounted it on a lightstand. I've got some wireless triggers also. Wow, are they helpful! Advice, if you have some, especially in terms of available speedlite modifiers, would be welcome.

It was a lot of fun. There's so much to learn..

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chrisvanbeekum
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Jan 13, 2012 18:25 |  #2

better than my first attempt . you should either have it at a 45 angle to the model , or have a reflector on the other side . also if you can , find a way to diffuse it , a larger catchlight in the eyes is much more appealing . even a 5x5 piece of milk plastic would work . but i say good job


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Jan 13, 2012 18:30 |  #3

her right eye is strange looking with the white just showing


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charro ­ callado
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Jan 13, 2012 18:39 |  #4

On thing to watch for is short vs. broad lighting. The side of her face closest to the camera is lit here (broad lighting), which is generally not flattering. The way shadows fall across the face is also something you'll get very accustomed to nit picking and controlling.

I assume you have visited the strobist website? http://strobist.blogsp​ot.com/ (external link) Tons of good info there geared toward OCF rookies.

"You've taken your first step into a larger world."


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nes_matt
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Jan 14, 2012 10:07 |  #5

I think she can easily support broad side lighting. Short lighting is helpful on heavier subjects. very pretty lady.

But the contrast is too much imo. Back down the speed light power and open the shutter - or use a reflector to help bring up the dark side (a piece of white foam board or the like will do).

When you say you used a diffuser, are you talking the little covers that go on the speed light? The catch light looks really small so I'm guessing that's what you used (or the light was far away from her). Using a larger diffuser (like a shoot through umbrella) close in will really soften those hard shadows.


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Jan 14, 2012 10:17 |  #6

nes_matt wrote in post #13703195 (external link)
I think she can easily support broad side lighting. Short lighting is helpful on heavier subjects. very pretty lady.

But the contrast is too much imo. Back down the speed light power and open the shutter - or use a reflector to help bring up the dark side (a piece of white foam board or the like will do).

When you say you used a diffuser, are you talking the little covers that go on the speed light? The catch light looks really small so I'm guessing that's what you used (or the light was far away from her). Using a larger diffuser (like a shoot through umbrella) close in will really soften those hard shadows.

Thanks. I did use a small Stofen diffuser. I have a shoot through umbrella and I definitely should have tried it. The shadows are a bit heavy. I'll try moving the speedlite back a bit and try and make the shadows softer next time.

Thanks for the advice.


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Jan 14, 2012 10:19 |  #7

charro callado wrote in post #13700591 (external link)
On thing to watch for is short vs. broad lighting. The side of her face closest to the camera is lit here (broad lighting), which is generally not flattering. The way shadows fall across the face is also something you'll get very accustomed to nit picking and controlling.

I assume you have visited the strobist website? http://strobist.blogsp​ot.com/ (external link) Tons of good info there geared toward OCF rookies.

"You've taken your first step into a larger world."


joe

Strobist? I have, thanks. I agree, its a great resource. I have a reflector - I really should have set it up. Thanks for the advice - I have a lot to think about the next time I try this out.

Thanks a lot


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ConverseMan
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Jan 14, 2012 10:26 |  #8

Hey Michael. Believe it or not - moving your light further back would make your shadows more harsh. Think of it this way: Take a flash light and set up a cup on a table. Move the flashlight closer and further away from the cup and see which produces softer shadows. The closer you get your light source, the more the light wraps around your subject. The further away you get, the harsher the shadows get because your light source to subject size ratio is smaller.

In our minds, the sun is a massive light source, it produces a lot of light, but it is so far away that it becomes a "small" light modifier and that is why shadows on peoples faces are terrible during midday sun. On the contrary, overcast skies and clouds act as a massive light modifier and soften the light, bringing the light source closer to us, and spreading out the light, producing much softer shadows.

Hopefully that makes sense. ;) As far as a modifier - get a good shoot-thru umbrella and start shooting. That is the best place to start!


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Jan 14, 2012 10:42 |  #9

ConverseMan wrote in post #13703263 (external link)
Hey Michael. Believe it or not - moving your light further back would make your shadows more harsh. Think of it this way: Take a flash light and set up a cup on a table. Move the flashlight closer and further away from the cup and see which produces softer shadows. The closer you get your light source, the more the light wraps around your subject. The further away you get, the harsher the shadows get because your light source to subject size ratio is smaller.

In our minds, the sun is a massive light source, it produces a lot of light, but it is so far away that it becomes a "small" light modifier and that is why shadows on peoples faces are terrible during midday sun. On the contrary, overcast skies and clouds act as a massive light modifier and soften the light, bringing the light source closer to us, and spreading out the light, producing much softer shadows.

Hopefully that makes sense. ;) As far as a modifier - get a good shoot-thru umbrella and start shooting. That is the best place to start!

Thanks Nathan, that made a lot of sense. I have a decent shoot through umbrella that I'll definitely try out tonight. There really is a lot to think about with light. I'll try and set up my reflector too. I should get much better results this evening. I really appreciate the advice.


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ConverseMan
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Jan 14, 2012 13:25 |  #10

No problem Michael! Took me a while to figure that out. ;) The closer you can get your light source the better as well as the bigger the light source, the better. Just play around with it and have fun. You'll learn lots I'm sure! :)


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Jan 18, 2012 08:30 as a reply to  @ ConverseMan's post |  #11

Hopefully I've learned something. Here's my second attempt

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ConverseMan
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Jan 18, 2012 08:34 |  #12

Second shot is awesome :)


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jwp721
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Jan 18, 2012 09:03 |  #13

ConverseMan wrote in post #13724881 (external link)
Second shot is awesome :)

If that were a Va Tech hat it would be even better. ;)

Congrats on your new flash... Looks like you are having fun using it.

John




  
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gonzogolf
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Jan 18, 2012 09:10 |  #14

Seventeen Nineteen wrote in post #13703231 (external link)
Thanks. I did use a small Stofen diffuser. I have a shoot through umbrella and I definitely should have tried it. The shadows are a bit heavy. I'll try moving the speedlite back a bit and try and make the shadows softer next time.

Thanks for the advice.

Moving the speedlite back wont make the shadows any softer. Two things make light softer, the size of the source, and distance from the subject (closer is softer). In this case you had a small light source, and forget the stofen they are mostly useless. The umbrella would have made a big difference. Getting closer also makes light softer, but with such a small light source it wouldnt make that big of difference.




  
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Jan 18, 2012 09:12 |  #15

gonzogolf wrote in post #13725019 (external link)
Moving the speedlite back wont make the shadows any softer. Two things make light softer, the size of the source, and distance from the subject (closer is softer). In this case you had a small light source, and forget the stofen they are mostly useless. The umbrella would have made a big difference. Getting closer also makes light softer, but with such a small light source it wouldnt make that big of difference.

Thanks. I'm figuring it out. Somewhat counterintuitive, but I get it. I've been experimenting with umbrellas a bit.


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First attempt at lighting
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