Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
Thread started 29 Jan 2012 (Sunday) 11:34
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

7D back button auto focus setting question

 
stillwatergal
Senior Member
292 posts
Joined Jul 2008
     
Jan 29, 2012 11:34 |  #1

I use and like BBAF but, in preparation for an upcoming trip to Africa, wanted to go over my 7D settings and think about whether or not to make any changes. While I was particularly thinking about c1, c2, and c3 and how to make the best use of them, I got way-laid in custom settings and ended up with a question. ;)

The way I've had BBAF set up has been as follows:
Shutter/half press: * (AE Lock)
AF-ON: Default (Metering and AF start)
* (AE Lock Button): AF-ON (Metering and AF start).

This set up, while a bit redundant, has worked well and while I'm not displeased with it I want to make sure I'm not missing something I could benefit from.

In reviewing my choices for each of those 3 buttons, I realized I'd overlooked an option. I could choose to set the Shutter/half press to Metering Start.
I probably wouldn't have given this much thought had I not seen this article: http://www.deepgreenph​otography.com …ing-up-your-new-canon-7d/ (external link)
in which Doug Brown (who photographs birds) explained that he sets the Shutter half press to Metering Start and then moves the AE Lock function to the 2nd button. He sets his * (AE Lock Button): AF-ON (Metering and AF start).

So, I'm trying to understand what a separate button for Metering Start accomplishes. I'm also trying to understand how it works together with the Metering and AF start setting (since those choices are always linked).

I've read Canon's explanation and if I'm understanding what part of their explanation applies, they say that when you use Metering Start: ' Metering is continuously updated — if you shoot a sequence of pictures, the camera takes a fresh meter reading for each one. There’s no locking of exposure, unless you separately press the AE Lock button (this last item is not possible on some EOS models).'

It all leaves me scratching my head. I know this Metering Start setting is included for some reason but I'm just not grasping it all. What do you gain and what do you lose with Doug Brown's set up? Or....what am I missing here?????

Can someone help?
Thanks :)


Stephanie
5D3, 7D, Canon lenses: 24-105mm f4 L IS, 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS, 70-200mm f4 L IS, 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 EF-S, Kenko Pro 300 1.4X tc, Cotton Carrier, PS CS6, Lightroom 5.x, Epson Stylus Pro 3800

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
Flores
Goldmember
1,179 posts
Likes: 2
Joined May 2010
Location: TEXAS
     
Jan 29, 2012 11:38 |  #2

the Cmodes are just manual presets, so if the metering changes, your exposure settings don't change.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
stillwatergal
THREAD ­ STARTER
Senior Member
292 posts
Joined Jul 2008
     
Jan 30, 2012 16:35 |  #3

Flores wrote in post #13788532 (external link)
the Cmodes are just manual presets, so if the metering changes, your exposure settings don't change.

Either I don't understand what you are saying or I'm not asking my question clearly. I'm asking about the custom function IV-01 "Custom Controls," not about the modes C1, C2 and C3.


Stephanie
5D3, 7D, Canon lenses: 24-105mm f4 L IS, 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS, 70-200mm f4 L IS, 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 EF-S, Kenko Pro 300 1.4X tc, Cotton Carrier, PS CS6, Lightroom 5.x, Epson Stylus Pro 3800

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
eosphotomanoftennessee
Senior Member
268 posts
Joined Jan 2008
     
Jan 30, 2012 16:43 |  #4

I use the back AF button to start focus and use the shutter button for metering only. In shooting sports this is quite helpful since according to Canon AF performance for tracking is best when you have been tracking the subject for a at least a second. In soccer I just continuously focus and track using the back button then meter and take the photo using the shutter button. If I used the shutter to start AF and start metering then the exposure would be set when I started tracking and if the subject goes into a brighter or darker part (shadows of trees) of the field my first shot exposure would be off. BTW your link is to a page which is flagged by AV software as malicious.


Doug, osphotoman@yahoo.com (external link)
7D
;), Canon SX1 IS, Film Rebel for history
300L, 70-200L, 50 1.8, 28-105 EF, Sigma 18-50 EF-S
580Speedlite, AB Ring Flash, Excalibur 320, 2- Morris Optical Slaves
Adobe CS5 Extended, Wacom Graphics Tablet

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
stillwatergal
THREAD ­ STARTER
Senior Member
292 posts
Joined Jul 2008
     
Jan 30, 2012 17:00 |  #5

eosphotomanoftennessee wrote in post #13796259 (external link)
I use the back AF button to start focus and use the shutter button for metering only. In shooting sports this is quite helpful since according to Canon AF performance for tracking is best when you have been tracking the subject for a at least a second. In soccer I just continuously focus and track using the back button then meter and take the photo using the shutter button. If I used the shutter to start AF and start metering then the exposure would be set when I started tracking and if the subject goes into a brighter or darker part (shadows of trees) of the field my first shot exposure would be off. BTW your link is to a page which is flagged by AV software as malicious.

This makes perfect sense! Thanks. So, I'm guessing that in shooting soccer,or other outdoor sports, you don't use AE Lock at all and rely instead on the exposure that the meter senses. Am I correct?

Re the "malicious" link, I have no idea what to make of this since I found this site and used it with no warning link the other day. Today, it certainly does pop up with that warning. Shame, it was a good article....


Stephanie
5D3, 7D, Canon lenses: 24-105mm f4 L IS, 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS, 70-200mm f4 L IS, 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 EF-S, Kenko Pro 300 1.4X tc, Cotton Carrier, PS CS6, Lightroom 5.x, Epson Stylus Pro 3800

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
highergr0und
Senior Member
545 posts
Joined Aug 2011
     
Jan 30, 2012 17:18 |  #6

Be careful changing your ways right before a trip.... don't want to mix stuff up when you're shooting on the fly. For fast moving, I would really make it as simple as possible. It would be tragic to miss shots because your fingers confused the buttons leaving you with wonderfully exposed blurs or badly exposed sharps.

Metering start should start metering, AE lock locks it, and the AF, well focuses. Maybe that guy uses the focusing/meter to get started and get focus, then re-frames the shot, re-meters, locks, and shoots. Maybe he rarely locks it but just wants it there in case.


T3i, Sigma 10-20, Sigma 30 1.4, 18-55 kit, 55-250, YN-565, a few books, some software, and a desire to get good.....

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
stillwatergal
THREAD ­ STARTER
Senior Member
292 posts
Joined Jul 2008
     
Jan 30, 2012 17:24 as a reply to  @ highergr0und's post |  #7

Appreciate the comment about changing what you do close to time of trip. I'm not going till March, so plenty of time to fiddle. I'm actually trying to think ahead for a change :-)

Do you use this "3 button method" and lock exposure on moving images with AE Lock? Seems unnecessary and I'm betting, having read the whole article, that he really uses it when things are static (or perhaps not for animals/birds at all, but rather for the occasional landscape or whatever)


Stephanie
5D3, 7D, Canon lenses: 24-105mm f4 L IS, 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS, 70-200mm f4 L IS, 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 EF-S, Kenko Pro 300 1.4X tc, Cotton Carrier, PS CS6, Lightroom 5.x, Epson Stylus Pro 3800

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
tonylong
...winded
Avatar
54,657 posts
Gallery: 60 photos
Likes: 546
Joined Sep 2007
Location: Vancouver, WA USA
     
Jan 30, 2012 20:04 |  #8

stillwatergal wrote in post #13796444 (external link)
Appreciate the comment about changing what you do close to time of trip. I'm not going till March, so plenty of time to fiddle. I'm actually trying to think ahead for a change :-)

Do you use this "3 button method" and lock exposure on moving images with AE Lock? Seems unnecessary and I'm betting, having read the whole article, that he really uses it when things are static (or perhaps not for animals/birds at all, but rather for the occasional landscape or whatever)

AE Lock is good for getting an exposure (and maybe a focus) on a subject and then recomposing so that the camera would get a different exposure from the one you wanted. It would be more useful for stationary subjects, of course!


Tony
Two Canon cameras (5DC, 30D), three Canon lenses (24-105, 100-400, 100mm macro)
Tony Long Photos on PBase (external link)
Wildlife project pics here (external link), Biking Photog shoots here (external link), "Suburbia" project here (external link)! Mount St. Helens, Mount Hood pics here (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
ejenner
Goldmember
Avatar
3,860 posts
Gallery: 96 photos
Likes: 1048
Joined Nov 2011
Location: Denver, CO
     
Jan 31, 2012 17:51 |  #9

stillwatergal wrote in post #13796444 (external link)
Do you use this "3 button method" and lock exposure on moving images with AE Lock?

Never. I only use AE lock on stationary targets. For moving targets I would use the above posted method or with the ultimate AE lock - manual exposure.

I don't see the point in AE lock on a moving target - unless perhaps you are doing this instead of manual by say using spot metering and pointing to a blue sky or something mid-range tone. IMO it's easier to just dial in manual until you get what you want and then just use that.


Edward Jenner
5DIV, M6, GX1 II, Sig15mm FE, 16-35 F4,TS-E 17, TS-E 24, 35 f2 IS, M11-22, M18-150 ,24-105, T45 1.8VC, 70-200 f4 IS, 70-200 2.8 vII, Sig 85 1.4, 100L, 135L, 400DOII.
http://www.flickr.com/​photos/48305795@N03/ (external link)
https://www.facebook.c​om/edward.jenner.372/p​hotos (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
stillwatergal
THREAD ­ STARTER
Senior Member
292 posts
Joined Jul 2008
     
Jan 31, 2012 17:55 |  #10

I find manual hard to use quickly enough with a moving target, though I might quickly meter off sky or mid-tone and then lock AE in.


Stephanie
5D3, 7D, Canon lenses: 24-105mm f4 L IS, 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS, 70-200mm f4 L IS, 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 EF-S, Kenko Pro 300 1.4X tc, Cotton Carrier, PS CS6, Lightroom 5.x, Epson Stylus Pro 3800

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
rral22
Senior Member
885 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Jul 2008
Location: Saskatchewan, Canada
     
Jan 31, 2012 18:02 |  #11

I use back button focus, shutter button meters, lock AE button when I find I'm strapped for time, Manual exposure control when I have time or consistent light.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Staszek
Goldmember
Avatar
3,606 posts
Likes: 4
Joined Mar 2010
Location: San Jose, CA
     
Jan 31, 2012 18:03 |  #12

Here's how I use mine:

Shutter button - AE Start
AF On - AF/AE Start
* - AE Lock


SOSKIphoto (external link) | Blog (external link) | Facebook (external link)| Instagram (external link)
Shooting with big noisy cameras and a bag of primes.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
actprivate
Senior Member
Avatar
499 posts
Joined Jun 2008
Location: Australia
     
Jan 31, 2012 18:19 |  #13

Staszek wrote in post #13802653 (external link)
Here's how I use mine:

Shutter button - AE Start
AF On - AF/AE Start
* - AE Lock

This is the ultimate set up if you want to have them all at your finger tips (pardon the pun).

It takes a while before this set up sinks in our system for using multiple buttons. but once we master it, it's all we want: AE, AE lock and AF all activated separately.

This set up is of course available on EOS bodies that have AF-On button. On older models, is the choice of AE start OR AE-Lock but not both.

I prefer manual exposure in tricky situations. It takes a very short while to establish the exposure setting that gives best result. But one needs to be careful not to use auto ISO in manual mode! :-)


_______________
Canon Electro-Optical System

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
ejenner
Goldmember
Avatar
3,860 posts
Gallery: 96 photos
Likes: 1048
Joined Nov 2011
Location: Denver, CO
     
Feb 01, 2012 14:24 |  #14

stillwatergal wrote in post #13802605 (external link)
I find manual hard to use quickly enough with a moving target, though I might quickly meter off sky or mid-tone and then lock AE in.

Yea, the point of manual here is that you meter before you start even shooting and stay with that. Suppose you are indoors or under a cloudy sky taking shots (or any situation where the lighting is not changing much), you don't want the meter to suddenly underexpose of you add some sky to the frame or overexpose if the background changes from a light to dark subject.

If the subject is moving from sun to shade, then manual will not work well, but neither will AE lock when you first acquire the target if they move from sun to shade. In that case it's probably better to just set exposure just before the shutter release.


Edward Jenner
5DIV, M6, GX1 II, Sig15mm FE, 16-35 F4,TS-E 17, TS-E 24, 35 f2 IS, M11-22, M18-150 ,24-105, T45 1.8VC, 70-200 f4 IS, 70-200 2.8 vII, Sig 85 1.4, 100L, 135L, 400DOII.
http://www.flickr.com/​photos/48305795@N03/ (external link)
https://www.facebook.c​om/edward.jenner.372/p​hotos (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
amfoto1
Cream of the Crop
10,251 posts
Likes: 84
Joined Aug 2007
Location: San Jose, California
     
Feb 01, 2012 15:23 |  #15

I definitely would not set up my cameras so that a half press of the shutter release button will always do AE Lock. That's a feature only occasionally needed, not all the time. Most of the time, in fact, if following moving subjects through variable light or if lighting itself is changing, AE Lock would easily cause exposure errors and AE un-Locked is the better choice. That's fine in most situations, in fact... You only want AE Lock in special situations, such as a strongly backlit subject (where you step in, meter of their face or something, lock AE, then move back to take the shot). So I am fine having AE Lock assigned to a button, for occasional use when needed.

I used to shoot with manual focus film cameras that had AE Lock only, by default. Had to learn to lift pressure off the shutter release and re-meter, any and every time lighting changed or the subject moved to different lighting.... which was a lot of the time in many situations. Lifting pressure momentarily to re-meter like this with modern AF camera and IS lenses could easily creater more problems than it corrects in a lot of shooting situations (AF less so if using Back Button Focusing).

If a moving subject is in fairly steady light, such as indoors, Manual is often a better choice and is much like using AE lock (which only works in auto modes... AE stands for Auto Exposure, after all).

Personally I use the * button to start and operate AF... And have the AF On button set to handle AE Lock... This is just a preference that I use for two reasons: One is that I prefer the larger, more prominent button closer to my thumb for AF operation, because I use it all the time and AE Lock is only needed occasionally. The second reason is that older cameras, some of which I still use, either do not have the AF On button at all or lack it among the secondary controls on the vertical battery grip, so you have to use * for AF with those models. So I just have it set to use * for focus operation consistently across all the models I use.

If only using one camera... and particularly one such as the 7D that has both AF On and * buttons on both the camera body and the vert grip... heck just use them set up whichever way you prefer.

Another thing that hasn't been mentioned, since going to BBF, I leave the camera set to AI Servo by default. I can control AF starting and stopping simply by applying or lifting pressure on the back button.... So there's less reason for me to use One Shot. However, when shooting static subjects, I still usually change to One Shot, simply because it can be more accurate and it gives focus confirmation (which AI Servo doesn't).

However, I find that I've been using Live View more and more for situations with still subjects that require the greatest focus accuracy. As a result, I'm probably using One Shot less and less.

By default and most of the time, I just have Single Point AF set up and the center AF point selected. I will occasionally use other focus modes that the 7D offers. But the simplest setup is pretty widely usable, particularly along with BBF (because it makes focusing and recomposing easy).

The most useful, to me, of the other 7D modes are Spot Focus, first, for it's greater precision (at some cost of focus speed); Expansion and Zone I use less, but probably about the same as each other. I use them when shooting with a wide angle and a small aperutre giving lots of depth of field, so precise focus is less important. I also use them sometimes with moving subject that are well separated from distracting backgrounds or against a very plain background (a bird in flight against the sky, for example).

C.Fn III - 1, AF Sensitivity in AI Servo I used to have turned down to make it less likely that the camera would switch focus to another point, while tracking a moving subject. But after a couple years using the camera and learning how to use it well, I've gradually turned this back up and now have this set +1, to speed up tracking more erratically moving subjects, to correct for a subject that changes direction as quickly as possible. Though, if having to shoot around a lot of obstructions, I might again dial this back down.

C.Fn III - 2, Autofocus/Drive AI Servo 1st/2nd Image Priority I have set to default option 0: AF Priority/Tracking Priority.

C.Fn III - 3, Autofocus/Drive AI Servo Tracking Method I have set to 1: Continuous AF Track Priority. I think this mostly effects when using multiple AF points, doesn't have much effect when using Single Point, Manually Selected.

C.Fn III - 4, AF/Drive Lens Drive when AF impossible I've been leaving set to default 0: Focus Search On lately. If I start to get a lot of hunting for some reason, I'll switch this off.

Most of the other C.Fns just have to do with what modes are available, Micro Adjust, how things are displayed... All things that are largely up to personal preferences... Not so much related to AF performance. One exception is C.Fn III - 12: AF/Drive Orientation Linked AF Poing. I tried this for a while, but find with faster moving subjects that it seemed to be causing a slight AF delay each time I changed camera orientation. I missed some shots because of this so now have it set to default 0: Same for both vert & horiz. When using this feature, not only is it possible to set different AF points, it's also possible to have the camera use different AF modes that are orientation-related. For example, you could have Single Point set up for horizontal and Zone Focus or Expansion Points set up for vertical orienation. Also, if using this feature, it's important to note that there are actually three orientation modes that need to be set up: horizontal (landscape), vertical (portrait) with the grip at the bottom, and vertical (portrait) with the grip at the top. Forget to set one and things can get weird when you are trying to shoot fast!


Alan Myers (external link) "Walk softly and carry a big lens."
5DII, 7DII(x2), 7D(x2) & other cameras. 10-22mm, Tokina 12-24/4, 20/2.8, TS 24/3.5L, 24-70/2.8L, 28/1.8, 28-135 IS (x2), TS 45/2.8, 50/1.4, Tamron 60/2.0, 70-200/4L IS, 70-200/2.8 IS, 85/1.8, Tamron 90/2.5 Macro, 100/2.8 USM, 100-400L II, 135/2L, 180/3.5L, 300/4L IS (x2), 300/2.8L IS, 500/4L IS, EF 1.4X II, EF 2X II. Flashes, studio strobes & various access. - FLICKR (external link) - ZENFOLIO (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

5,955 views & 0 likes for this thread
7D back button auto focus setting question
FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is leeloming
839 guests, 327 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 15144, that happened on Nov 22, 2018

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.