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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
Thread started 05 Feb 2012 (Sunday) 23:18
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(Worth it?)Canon EOS 60D or...

 
BrickR
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Feb 08, 2012 21:16 |  #61

I got my 60d through CLP. Was simple: buy or find a crappy old Canon camera, broken or not (I bought one on Craigslist). Call the number, (ask if they have the body in stock) place your order. They'll ask you what camera you're trading in just to put it in the computer (no serial # needed), purchase DSLR at reduced price with your CC. They'll send it 2 business day shipping/signature required. It comes with everything that would normally be in the box if new. You pack your trade-in in the box and use the label they email you to send in your old camera.
You have 14 days for returns.
Enjoy your new DSLR at a killer price!


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jhayesvw
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Feb 08, 2012 21:47 as a reply to  @ BrickR's post |  #62

I got my 60d through CLP also.
it was just under $700 shipped.
easy to do.
the T2i is available from them also for a great price if that is what youre looking for.
My T1i is a great camera too, so the t2i will be even a little nicer.



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Nick3434
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Feb 08, 2012 22:11 |  #63

Get a used XSi, you can steal them. Spend money on lenses. When you feel yourself needing more, keep good glass, get new body. Since you have not had a DSLR yet that is the perfect solution. Hell, I still haven't traded up from the XSi, mostly because at this point I am being patient for Canon offerings. Most everyone here would rather have an older rebel camera and say the 17-55 lens over a 60D and the kit lens if the had to pick one combo to be married to.


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ssmanak
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Feb 09, 2012 05:30 |  #64

mpix345 wrote in post #13832710 (external link)
Naraly, first off, welcome to the forum. You'll get plenty of advice here. Most of it will be pretty good. And even more of it will compel you to spend more money than you have budgeted...

I will say in general that if you are on a somewhat tight budget I would really recommend shopping for used gear. It saves you money off retail, and also makes it easy to try out different options and re-sell them without taking a huge loss (if you shop wisely).

For the 60D + 18-135 you are looking at ~ $1200. The 18-135 is a nice all purpose lens, but really does not excel in any of the areas you mention.

For that $1200 I would look at a T2i for <$450, a Tamron 17-50 non VC for $350, a Canon 85/1.8 for $325, or the 50/1.8 for $100 (50/1.4 for $350). The T2i was just available new for $399, so maybe if you are patient you will see a hot price like that again soon. Check in the Marketplace section here every day. You have to be patient but ready to pounce when a deal comes up.

The 17-50 is a great value lens. Pretty fast at constant 2.8 for those action shots. Not as wide as you'd want for landscape shots, but it will cost you another $500+ for a nice WA lens, so I'd de-prioritize that.

The 85/1.8 is great for portraits and action, the 50/1.8 or 50/1.4 is a an OK option, especially if the 85 is too long for you. Use your current p&s and figure out what focal lengths you're most likely to shoot at for portraits.

I really thnk the 17-50/2.8 and the 85/1.8 are a great start. Spend some time with those options and you'll start to understand what else you need in addition to or instead of those lenses.

+1. I will go for EOS 600D with Tamron 17-50 (non VC) plus 85 f1.8. I am willing to restart with this basic kit:lol:


ss.manak
EOS 6D ii, Canon 24-105f4 L ii, Canon 50 f1.4, Tamron 100-400 f4.5-6.3 VC, Canon 430EX ii, Canon 270 exii

  
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Naraly
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Feb 11, 2012 23:00 |  #65

I made an hour drive today to the only camera store anywhere near my area, and it was a dissapointment. The young girl that attended me did not really seem like she knew what she was talking about, she didn't even know where or what used cameras they had, and didn't know about the CLP. Also they hardly had ANY cameras in stock, so I didn't get to feel what the T2i or 60D felt like. I ended up going to another Best Buy, the 60D somehow didn't feel right in my hands, didn't have a good grip for me, maybe I just need some getting used to, to the DSLRs. T2i it is! I will be ordering the body from bestbuy online for $600.

Thanks to all that participated in this thread! I was amazed at all the replies and such good advice! You will definetaly be hearing from me again :D

p.s. I decided not to use the CLP to get a t2i because I got worried about the shutter count, I would rather start from 0 :)



Cheers,
Nora

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Jay-Bird
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Feb 11, 2012 23:06 |  #66

It has been said a lot, but check the used market, or even canons refurb site. I started off 3 years ago with a Rebel XT and a 18-50 kit lens. I think I learned the most when I got a 50MM 1.8. Primes like the 50 give you so much to work with and make you think about composition, you cant just zoom in.

I then stepped up to a 20D, which taught me the pro controls and am only now buying a newer camera, a 60D.

As much as I would have loved to have purchased a brand new XXD when I first started, I think working with the limitations of older bodies made me better. I would liken it to learning to shoot with a revolver, as opposed to a high capacity semi-auto. You only have six shots so you need to make them count.

That being said, all of the new Canons are a lot more user friendly, so the learning curve is not as high.

But what ever you decide to do, after buying the camera, the first purchase you should make is a prime! Good luck!


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Marco2011
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Feb 12, 2012 02:56 |  #67

If you are planning to upgrade your gear in the future, then buy a little cheap camera like t2i. then go for full frame camera.. 60d is a good camera but still its not a full frame camera. 550d/60d/7d all have the same sensor though.


Eos 550D Gripped :D Canon Speedlite 430ex ii :D Canon EF 70-200mm F4L IS USM :D Canon 18-55mm kit lens :(

  
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mickeyb105
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Feb 12, 2012 09:34 |  #68

Naraly wrote in post #13871629 (external link)
I made an hour drive today to the only camera store anywhere near my area, and it was a dissapointment. The young girl that attended me did not really seem like she knew what she was talking about, she didn't even know where or what used cameras they had, and didn't know about the CLP. Also they hardly had ANY cameras in stock, so I didn't get to feel what the T2i or 60D felt like. I ended up going to another Best Buy, the 60D somehow didn't feel right in my hands, didn't have a good grip for me, maybe I just need some getting used to, to the DSLRs. T2i it is! I will be ordering the body from bestbuy online for $600.

Thanks to all that participated in this thread! I was amazed at all the replies and such good advice! You will definetaly be hearing from me again :D

p.s. I decided not to use the CLP to get a t2i because I got worried about the shutter count, I would rather start from 0 :)

Do whatever makes you comfortable.

But my 60D came to me with like 350 shutter actuations and no visible signs of use. I've put 5,000 actuations on it since due to Christmas and work in less than two months, to put that 350 into perspective.


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BrickR
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Feb 12, 2012 21:21 |  #69

You shouldn't worry about shutter count on a CLP camera. MOST of them are less than 100 clicks if you read people's testimonies, and even 100 actuations on a shutter is nothing. Besides that, very few new cameras are actually checked as part of the quality control process in respect to how many are made. Every CLP camera is checked.
I couldn't see going with a new T2i for $600 when CLP price will basically be enough for a lens and body at that same price.

Regardless, you will thoroghly enjoy the T2i!


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Max ­ Peck
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Feb 12, 2012 21:44 |  #70

Just bought a T3i about a month ago. Have been using mainly Canon P&S units (Power-Shot Pro-1, SX-10) for the last several years. Tried a Rebel XT about eight or ten years ago and felt the technology wasn't ready yet. (I used to shoot with Olympus OM-1, etc. many many moons ago) - back when I developed my shots in the darkroom. :-)

Very impressed with the T3i. As a hobbyist I find that it is lightning quick and the images are superb. The unit is light enough to carry in my backpack but is still full-fledged as an SLR. Sweet.

As someone else said, it seems that just about anything in this price range would do great, particularly for a hobbyist. The 18-50 kit takes great shots as does the 55-250 I bought with it. I'm "in" to photography now but not so deep that I want to micromanage my equipment anymore. You will not go wrong with the T2i (or T3i) and a couple of good lenses. Once you get your camera and lenses, just enjoy what you can produce from it. It will take a hobbyist a LONG time to outgrow the capability in this equipment. This stuff really has come of age. Don't get too hung up on all the minutiae. You can spend tons of money for a small percentage difference in the equipment that, as a hobbyist, will not really matter to you. Honestly. You do not have to spend mega-bucks on this stuff to get really terrific results and really be an artist with it.

My 2-cents.

-Max :-)


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mwsilver
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Feb 13, 2012 21:36 |  #71

Naraly wrote in post #13832637 (external link)
the guy at best buy said with a higher shutter speed I could accidentally take way more frames than I wanted) and I don't really need lightning fast speed. I plan on taking action shots though, once in a while.

The guy at best buy is an idiot. You'll quickly learn that there are a lots features and settings to exploit with a DSLR, but the three most important for starters are shutter speed, aperture, and ISO.

The shutter speed can be varied on a 60D to up to 1/8000 of a second, or as slow as 30 seconds or more with the Bulb setting. The aperture is the opening in the lens that allows more or less light onto the sensor and the ISO setting changes the sensitivity of the sensor. These three settings works together to give you a huge variety of different results. They are modified in combination depending on the subject and location you're shooting, the available light, and your intent. The best buy guy was referring to the continuous shooting mode which is 5.3 pictures a second. This mode is used for such things as sports photography or any situation where you want to capture all the action. In this mode, you could occasionally shoot more pictures than you planned to, but who cares., and all DSLRs have this mode . But most of the time you will be shooting in One Shot mode, which as the name implies, will only take a single picture.

If your haven't purchased it yet, the most important feature you should check out is how it feels in your hands. The T2i (550D), the T3i(600d) and the 7D all use the same sensor and in skilled hands will all take very similar pictures. The real differentiator should be the feature set and how it feels when you hold it.


Mark
Canon 7D2, 60D, T3i, T2i, Sigma 18-35 f/1.8, 30 f/1.4. Canon EF 70-200 L f/4 IS, EF 35 f/2 IS, EFs 10-18 STM, EFs 15-85, EFs 18-200, EF 50 f/1.8 STM, Tamron 18-270 PZD, B+W MRC CPL, Canon 320EX, Vanguard Alta Pro 254CT & SBH 250 head. RODE Stereo Videomic Pro, DXO PhotoLab Elite, ON1

  
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MGiddings ­ Photography
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Feb 14, 2012 03:58 |  #72

Buy the best (normally the most expensive) camera you can afford when you go to buy it. Then make up your mind to keep it for a long time.


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DC ­ Fan
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Feb 14, 2012 04:50 as a reply to  @ MGiddings Photography's post |  #73

From actually owning and using a 60D and a T2i: there's no difference between the images generated from the two cameras.

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The only differences come from lighting and framing. Otherwise, the cameras are interchangeable. You can buy on price and not worry about being disappointed, as long as you have the experience to handle the equipment.



  
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mwsilver
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Feb 14, 2012 08:08 |  #74

DC Fan wrote in post #13894603 (external link)
From actually owning and using a 60D and a T2i: there's no difference between the images generated from the two cameras.

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The only differences come from lighting and framing. Otherwise, the cameras are interchangeable. You can buy on price and not worry about being disappointed, as long as you have the experience to handle the equipment.

Agreed for the most part. The handling is key. I have both and the results are very similar if not exactly identical, I know this because I've put both on tripods and used identical lenses with identical settings and there were consistent noticeable differences between the two regarding color, contrast and exposure. Small differences to be sure, and I also couldn't say for certain which gave superior results, but they were there.

But most importantly, is handling and ergonomics. I would not want to primarily use the much smaller and cramped and less balanced T2i, with its fewer features, over the 60D unless I had no choice. Both are excellent cameras but the in-hand experience is different and, for me, the 60D is the clear winner. Anyone choosing between them should hold each and play with it with a lens attached before deciding.


Mark
Canon 7D2, 60D, T3i, T2i, Sigma 18-35 f/1.8, 30 f/1.4. Canon EF 70-200 L f/4 IS, EF 35 f/2 IS, EFs 10-18 STM, EFs 15-85, EFs 18-200, EF 50 f/1.8 STM, Tamron 18-270 PZD, B+W MRC CPL, Canon 320EX, Vanguard Alta Pro 254CT & SBH 250 head. RODE Stereo Videomic Pro, DXO PhotoLab Elite, ON1

  
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Judy08
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Feb 14, 2012 09:53 |  #75

There's lots of sound advice about going with the cheaper body so you can get good lenses but if you think you'll really get into photography, go with the 60D. I bought a T2i 3 months ago and am upgrading to a 60D already- at least for several years until I can get a FF. For me, the T2i is too light to balance with a good lens and too small to hold comfortably. I pretty much shoot in manual and I find adjusting the controls cumbersome.




  
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