Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 08 Mar 2012 (Thursday) 15:25
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

Need help Noob here

 
hminc
Hatchling
8 posts
Joined Mar 2012
     
Mar 08, 2012 15:25 |  #1

Hi I'm a noob and I'm about to buy my first camera for some youtube videos I want to film. I'm thinking on getting the T3i.I was wondering how do I know what each lens do? is there a website where give you examples of pictures with each different lens? if not then give me recommendations for starting ... want to shoot great footage of outdoors and big mountains and water and all that.. also want to do some deep of field shoots. thanks




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
HughR
Senior Member
Avatar
999 posts
Joined Feb 2011
Location: Toronto, Ontario
     
Mar 08, 2012 15:29 |  #2

If this is your first camera, a good lens suggestion would be the kit 18-55mm IS lens that Canon offers. You can use that for a while in both video and still images and then decide whether you want another lens later. Also, it is quite inexpensive and a good value. 18-55mm on the T3i covers the most used range of focal lengths.


Hugh
Canon 60D, Original Digital Rebel (2003)
EFS 15-85mm IS USM, EF 70-300mm IS USM, Tokina 11-16mm
Speedlite 430EX, Speedlite 430EX II,
Qbox 16 pro, Lastolite EZbox 24x24, Lumiquest Softbox III

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
cfcRebel
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
10,252 posts
Joined Feb 2005
Location: Austin, TX
     
Mar 08, 2012 15:42 |  #3

Welcome to the forum!:D
I echo what Hugh said. If you aren't sure of what you need specifically, then start with the basic kit. Once you know whether you need wider or longer focal length, then only upgrade.


Fee

Canon | SIGMA | TAMRON | Kenko | Amvona

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
hminc
THREAD ­ STARTER
Hatchling
8 posts
Joined Mar 2012
     
Mar 08, 2012 16:01 |  #4

I can do some great deep of field shoots with a 18-55mm?




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
robertwsimpson
Goldmember
Avatar
2,471 posts
Likes: 60
Joined Jun 2010
Location: West Palm Beach, FL USA
     
Mar 08, 2012 16:05 |  #5

get the 50mm f/1.8. it will give you what you want most likely.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
gonzogolf
dumb remark memorialized
30,270 posts
Gallery: 296 photos
Best ofs: 2
Likes: 8898
Joined Dec 2006
     
Mar 08, 2012 16:05 |  #6

hminc wrote in post #14051627 (external link)
I can do some great deep of field shoots with a 18-55mm?

Start making regular shots before you start aiming for depth of field tricks. But what you mean to say is shallow depth of field shots...




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
boochoo
Member
49 posts
Joined Jan 2012
     
Mar 08, 2012 16:08 |  #7

robertwsimpson wrote in post #14051649 (external link)
get the 50mm f/1.8. it will give you what you want most likely.

agreed. you can't go wrong with this lens. costs like 100 bucks brand new and you'll get a nice depth of field that you were looking for




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
cfcRebel
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
10,252 posts
Joined Feb 2005
Location: Austin, TX
     
Mar 08, 2012 16:08 |  #8

hminc wrote in post #14051627 (external link)
I can do some great deep of field shoots with a 18-55mm?

Great depth of field, i take it you mean MAJORITY of the frame is in focus, like for landscape photo, right? Yes, the wider the focal length such as 18mm, more elements in the frame will be in focus.
Not sure why other folks here recommended a 50mm f1.8 prime lens when you already mentioned "outdoors and big mountains and water "? :S


Fee

Canon | SIGMA | TAMRON | Kenko | Amvona

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
boochoo
Member
49 posts
Joined Jan 2012
     
Mar 08, 2012 16:17 |  #9

cfcRebel wrote in post #14051677 (external link)
Great depth of field, i take it you mean MAJORITY of the frame is in focus, like for landscape photo, right? Yes, the wider the focal length such as 18mm, more elements in the frame will be in focus.
Not sure why other folks here recommended a 50mm f1.8 prime lens when you already mentioned "outdoors and big mountains and water "? :S

because we assumed he meant shallow depth of field...and the prime does that very well. I also assumed the OP mentioned "outdoors and big mountains and water" in reference to video...with which the prime also does a fairly good job....but I could be totally wrong in regards to both of those assumptions..




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
cfcRebel
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
10,252 posts
Joined Feb 2005
Location: Austin, TX
     
Mar 08, 2012 16:26 |  #10

boochoo wrote in post #14051738 (external link)
because we assumed he meant shallow depth of field...and the prime does that very well. I also assumed the OP mentioned "outdoors and big mountains and water" in reference to video...with which the prime also does a fairly good job....but I could be totally wrong in regards to both of those assumptions..

Regardless video or photo, the principle is the same when it comes to Depth of Field for "outdoors and big mountains and water". If you have visited any National Parks in the US, you'll know a 50mm fast prime on crop body will cost you BIG TIME, i.e. missing many fantastic lanscape photo opportunities, or videos' for that matter.


Fee

Canon | SIGMA | TAMRON | Kenko | Amvona

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
robertwsimpson
Goldmember
Avatar
2,471 posts
Likes: 60
Joined Jun 2010
Location: West Palm Beach, FL USA
     
Mar 08, 2012 16:42 |  #11

panorama!




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
HughR
Senior Member
Avatar
999 posts
Joined Feb 2011
Location: Toronto, Ontario
     
Mar 09, 2012 10:42 |  #12

To clarify for hminc, the 18-55mm IS lens will provide excellent deep depth of field at the lower focal lengths (eg. 18-25mm) and f/11 to f/16. It will not provide very shallow depth of field, which the 50mm f/1.8 fixed focal length lens can do. I really think hminc will learn the most about photography and his preferences by starting with the 18-55mm. Then he can decide what direction he wants to move in (perhaps the 50mm f/1.8 or an additional zoom).


Hugh
Canon 60D, Original Digital Rebel (2003)
EFS 15-85mm IS USM, EF 70-300mm IS USM, Tokina 11-16mm
Speedlite 430EX, Speedlite 430EX II,
Qbox 16 pro, Lastolite EZbox 24x24, Lumiquest Softbox III

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
The ­ One ­ Pixel ­ Wonder
Member
80 posts
Joined Nov 2011
     
Mar 09, 2012 11:02 |  #13

hminc wrote in post #14051394 (external link)
is there a website where give you examples of pictures with each different lens?

pixel-peeper is great for seeing the kind of images people are taking with a particular lens at different focal lengths and f-stops. dpreview is great for more technical reviews and studio tests - their comparison tool is great for side-by-side comparisons.


TOPW

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
amfoto1
Cream of the Crop
10,256 posts
Likes: 86
Joined Aug 2007
Location: San Jose, California
     
Mar 09, 2012 11:36 |  #14

Yes, the EF-S 18-55 IS is a good starter lens for very little money. Bought in kit with one of the cameras, it's usually a particularly low cost option. If you want a little better and more versatile lens, the Canon EF-S 18-135 is often offered in kit, too... but costs a bit more. If you have more to spend and want a versatile lens, the Canon EF-S 15-85 IS is very popular, a little wider. Also fairly expensive, a larger aperture option is the Canon EF-S 17-55 IS.

Just to clarify a little, folks are correct telling you that the 18-55 can give you deep depth of field ( a lot of the image from near to far acceptibly sharp and in focus). To accomplish that, you use a smaller aperture in the lens, such as f5.6 or smaller. I know it's a little confusing, but the higher number of the aperture, the smaller it gets (it's actually a ratio is why: focal length or f over the aperture size). Thus, the larger apertures (that give less depth of field) are f1.4, f2, f2.8.... The middle size apertures (where a lot of lenses are their best optically) are f4, f5.6, f8... and the smallest apertures (that give more depth of field) are f11, f16, etc.

All lenses you will be considering can be stopped down to smaller apertures to render greater depth of field. At the other extreme, some lenses have larger maximum apertures than others and allow shallower depth of field.

The 18-55 is a zoom with a variable aperture range: f3.5 to f5.6. That means that at 18mm setting, it's largest possible aperture is f3.5, but it can be stopped down to smaller apertures than that. At the 55mm setting, it's largest aperture is f5.6 and it can be stopped down to smaller apertures from there, if you wish. Many zooms are made with variable apertures such as this, because it is less expensive and allows them to be smaller and lighter weight. There are constant aperture zooms that have f2.8 or f4 throughout their zoom range, at all focal lengths, but they are much more expensive, a lot bigger and a lot heavier.

Some responses have mentioned the Canon EF 50/1.8, a relatively inexpensive prime lens (ie., not a zoom) with a larger aperture that can be useful to make depth of field even shallower, such as to blur down a distracting background a lot when shooting a portrait. Compare with the 18-55 zoom, which at similar 55mm focal length can only achieve f5.6... The 50/1.8 is able to open up more than three additional f-stops, so can render much shallower depth of field.

Focal length of the lens determines the lens angle of view. 18mm on T3i is "moderately wide angle", about 30mm is "standard", 55mm is "short telephoto" and 135mm is "moderate telephoto". For some types of photography you mention - scenery - people often want a standard to wide to very wide or even ultra wide lens: 30 to 18mm, 15 to 12mm, even 11mm to 8mm. For portraits, often people use short telephoto: 50 to 85 or 90mm. For sports and action photography, they often use stronger telephotos, 100mm on up to 500mm and even longer. These are just a few examples.

Focal length relates to depth of field, too. The wider angle (shorter focal lengths) are easier to render deep depth of field, shots that are sharp from near to far. A 20mm lens, for example:

IMAGE: http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5246/5230107928_1a9de6bb44_b.jpg
Morro Bay harbor
EF 20mm f2.8 lens at f5.6, with B+W Kaesemann C-Pol filter. EOS 50D at ISO 200, 1/400 shutter speed. Handheld, available light (no flash).


Longer focal lengths more easily render shallow depth of field, heavily blurred backgrounds. A 300mm lens:

IMAGE: http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5066/5662048885_16d1666d12_b.jpg
Cloverleaf barrels April 20011 CSHA Region 3 gymkhana, Dunnigan, Calif.
EF 300mm f4 IS lens at f6.3. EOS 7D at ISO 400, 1/1000 shutter speed. Handheld, avail. light.


Another factor with depth of field is your distance from the subject... Up close, the same focal length and aperture will make for even shallower depth of field. Here's another shot with the same 300mm lens, only a lot closer:

IMAGE: http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6077/6107898152_755cbe9b25_o.jpg
Young ground squirrel with eucalyptus leaf
EF 300mm f4 IS lens at f5.6. EOS 7D at ISO 100, 1/400 shutter speed. Handheld, available light.


I suggest anyone new to photograqhy and seriously consider getting the book "Understanding Exposure" by Bryan Peterson (external link). It's an easy read and full of great info about a lot more than just making good exposures... it also goes into choosing lenses and apertures for various subjects.

Canon has a lot of info about lenses on their website... http://www.usa.canon.c​om …ts/cameras/ef_l​ens_lineup (external link)

For a lot more detail, specific to Canon, you might want to download Canon Lens Work III (external link), or try to find a copy of that hardbound book somewhere.

Many of the camera-specific guidebooks (external link) also contain a chapter discussing lenses and their uses in good detail. These books are good to have, anyway. They expand upon the info in the manual that comes with the camera.

In a nutshell...

On a budget, the 18-55 IS kit lens is a good "starter" lens to learn with.

Or, if you have a bit more to spend and want a little more telephoto reach, the 18-135 IS is sometimes offered as an alternative kit lens at a little higher price.

Or, if you want a bit wider lens and have more to spend, the 15-85 IS might be a good, versatile yet reasonably compact choice. You won't likely find it in kit, so expect to buy camera and lens separately and not get any sort of kit discount.

Or, if you want a faster lens, one with a bigger aperture, and have the budget for it, the 17-55/2.8 IS is a good choice. But, again, you won't likely find it in kit and should expect to buy camera and lens separately, probably won't get any sort of kit discount.

Whatever lens you get, I suggest buying the matching accessory lens hood for it and using it. The most obvious reason, the hood helps protect the lens against oblique light that can cause image problems such as veiling flare, loss of contrast, reduced color saturation. Wide angle lenses are harder to effectively shade than telephoto lenses, and zooms are harder to shade well over all their focal lengths, than a prime lens is with it's single focal length. But a matched hood designed specifically for the lens will do as good a job as possible. And a lens hood also protects against physical bumps while shooting, even provides some protection while stored in reversed position on the lens. It's just a good thing to do, to get in the habit of using the lens hood. In some cases Canon's are expensive... There are cheaper third party hoods available on eBay or at many of the major online retailers. Just search by the model number of the Canon hood, to see the alternatives.

I don't recommend a "protection" filter. Cheap ones often do a lot of harm to images and can even mess with auto focus. Good ones do minimal harm to images in all but the most extreme situations and generally don't effect AF, but get pretty pricey. Generally speaking, they don't provide much real world protection, either... after all, it's just a thin piece of glass!

Alan Myers (external link) "Walk softly and carry a big lens."
5DII, 7DII(x2), 7D(x2) & other cameras. 10-22mm, Tokina 12-24/4, 20/2.8, TS 24/3.5L, 24-70/2.8L, 28/1.8, 28-135 IS (x2), TS 45/2.8, 50/1.4, Tamron 60/2.0, 70-200/4L IS, 70-200/2.8 IS, 85/1.8, Tamron 90/2.5 Macro, 100/2.8 USM, 100-400L II, 135/2L, 180/3.5L, 300/4L IS (x2), 300/2.8L IS, 500/4L IS, EF 1.4X II, EF 2X II. Flashes, studio strobes & various access. - FLICKR (external link) - ZENFOLIO (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
hminc
THREAD ­ STARTER
Hatchling
8 posts
Joined Mar 2012
     
Mar 22, 2012 11:09 |  #15

thanks for all the info, really helpful all of you guys, I was wondering, do you guys think this is a good package and for the price?
http://www.ebay.com …0c40a1042#ht_18​495wt_1154 (external link)




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

3,164 views & 0 likes for this thread
Need help Noob here
FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is Heidi_eyeswideopen
806 guests, 233 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 15144, that happened on Nov 22, 2018

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.