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FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos Video and Sound Editing 
Thread started 09 Mar 2012 (Friday) 09:29
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Shooting Video on 5D for first time - help!

 
Jason1966
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Mar 09, 2012 09:29 |  #1

Hi there. I came across this forum and it looked good with very helpful people -so hopefully someone can help me!
Im shooting a small internet video with basic Dedo lights and a simply canon 5D and one 28-105 lens. Do you think this is enough for an inside shoot or should I be looking at a focus wheel or prime lens? Any help or links would be really good for me as I am very new to video on the 5D. Any advice or tips would also be welcome :-) thank you in advance! jason




  
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ben_r_
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Mar 09, 2012 11:56 |  #2

Do yourself a favor and pick up this book: LINK (external link)Itll give you A LOT of info youll need to get started.


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Etherealdc
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Mar 09, 2012 12:14 as a reply to  @ ben_r_'s post |  #3

What do you have in terms of stabilization rigs? With the rolling shutter on the 5D, hand-holding can result in some pretty ugly jell-o cam or skewing. If you want the hand-held look, look into a shoulder-rig: you can find some fairly inexpensive ones out there, and some even come with follow focus included. Also, you should invest in a fluid-head tripod... normal tripods are too jerky to give you smooth movement.

Go over what you want to do in your film, and choose rigs appropriately.


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Canon Nifty Fifty 1.4 | Canon 24-70mm 2.8 | Canon 70-200mm 2.8 | Canon 100mm 2.8 macro

  
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Häakon
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Mar 11, 2012 10:31 |  #4

Just be careful as "rigs" and other accessories can start to add up to a lot more than the camera itself! :P




  
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Etherealdc
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Mar 11, 2012 11:38 as a reply to  @ Häakon's post |  #5

It's true; I've probably spent about $1500 on all of my rigs (I have a shoulder-mount w/ follow focus, a fluid-head tripod, an 8' jib, a floor dolly, and a spreader dolly)... but your tools are going to give you better control and smoothness and will improve the quality of your work. You can build your own rigs if you're resourceful, too, and there are plenty of DIY sites online that can walk you through the process. I'm not handy, and have a very hard time with delaying gratification ;)


Ethereal Pictures
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Canon Nifty Fifty 1.4 | Canon 24-70mm 2.8 | Canon 70-200mm 2.8 | Canon 100mm 2.8 macro

  
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ben_r_
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Mar 11, 2012 12:40 |  #6

Häakon wrote in post #14066577 (external link)
Just be careful as "rigs" and other accessories can start to add up to a lot more than the camera itself! :P

And when using a dslr for video that's about how it should be. I have definitely spent more (several times more) on all my stabilization equipment and audio equipment.


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NivoMedia
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Mar 13, 2012 09:11 |  #7

if you are using a 24-105 you should be ok for a while, amazing lens.
ROTO makes very good lights for portable DLSR filming. dont be fooled into buying expensive "rigs" and all that fance crap you can make most of the accessories for DLSR's yourself for a fraction of the store markup.


I use a {3+2}D Mark [10-8] and a (23-16)D and a Nikon D(75+75)x2s and a Nikon D(38+2)x

  
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joka18
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Mar 14, 2012 10:29 |  #8

It depends on lighting you have to work with.
For shooting indoor, and assuming you don't have additional light source, you want lense faster than 2.0

Jason1966 wrote in post #14055768 (external link)
Hi there. I came across this forum and it looked good with very helpful people -so hopefully someone can help me!
Im shooting a small internet video with basic Dedo lights and a simply canon 5D and one 28-105 lens. Do you think this is enough for an inside shoot or should I be looking at a focus wheel or prime lens? Any help or links would be really good for me as I am very new to video on the 5D. Any advice or tips would also be welcome :-) thank you in advance! jason




  
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laselvasurf
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34 posts
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Mar 15, 2012 12:40 |  #9

Fast glass is key to good DSLR video. It's the shallow dof "look" that people want from DSLR most of the time. I'd recommend going with some good prime lenses to start, doesn't have to be canon, just something fast. You can spend thousands on stuff for dslr videos... I have about $5k into different kits and accessories for being able to do professional video work.


5D MKII, T2i, 24-105L, 100-400L, 12-24 Sigma, 20mm F1.8 Sigma, 28mm F1.8 Sigma, 35mm F1.4 Rokinon, 50mm F1.4 Canon, 85mm F1.4 Vivitar
flickr (external link)

  
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highres
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Joined Apr 2006
Location: Seattle United States
     
Mar 18, 2012 16:22 as a reply to  @ laselvasurf's post |  #10

I would agree with Etherealds's post about the fluid head tripod. A great investment toward improving video quality. I rented this monopod once and it was great! Easy to use. Very mobile as well.

http://www.bhphotovide​o.com …Video_Monopod_W​_Head.html (external link)




  
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Shooting Video on 5D for first time - help!
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