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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
Thread started 11 Mar 2012 (Sunday) 12:39
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newb question--how do you carry your camera?

 
canadave
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Mar 11, 2012 12:39 |  #1

This has got to be probably the silliest question ever asked on these forums, but as a newcomer to the exciting world of dSLR photography, I honestly don't know the answer (I hope this doesn't get the "book worthy" tag from someone!) :)

When you go out walking with your dSLR, how do you carry it? I mean, do you carry it at your side with the neck strap sitting on the same shoulder as the side the camera is on? (I'm leery of doing it this way, because it seems like it'd be too easy for it to slip off). Do you carry it slung from your neck directly in front of you, like tourists at Disneyland? (I've tried that method and the camera keeps "bouncing" off my chest every time I walk...I have no idea how people do this!) Do you carry it at your side, but with the neck strap slung around your opposite shoulder (safest, but difficult to get the camera up to your eyes if a sudden photo opportunity presents itself)?

For the sake of argument, assume it's being carried only with neck strap attached, not handheld. As for which lens is attached, sometimes it's any of the lenses in my sig. Also, I am in a very peaceful rural setting, so no chance of it getting "snatched" or anything like that. And, let's say as a final parameter, the walk is around 20-30 minutes.

Thanks! (for the answers, and for not pointing and laughing at the newbie)


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mike_d
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Mar 11, 2012 12:44 |  #2

I use either an OpTech sling strap (camera slides up and down strap from hip to eye) or a lengthened traditional strap. I'm thinking about a Cinch though. I always wear it across my body. I stopped wearing it behind my neck when I got a heavy lens. I don't trust anything valuable over just one shoulder. If I'm out with my bag and camera, the bag goes on my left hip (strap on right shoulder) and the camera goes the other way.




  
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canadave
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Mar 11, 2012 12:50 |  #3

mike_d wrote in post #14067061 (external link)
I use either an OpTech sling strap (camera slides up and down strap from hip to eye) or a lengthened traditional strap. I'm thinking about a Cinch though. I always wear it across my body. I stopped wearing it behind my neck when I got a heavy lens. I don't trust anything valuable over just one shoulder. If I'm out with my bag and camera, the bag goes on my left hip (strap on right shoulder) and the camera goes the other way.

So if you wear it the camera on its lengthened traditional strap across your body, do you find it difficult to bring the camera up to your eye? I tried this the other day, and maybe it was the bulky winter coat I was wearing, but the strap (the default Canon strap), even lengthened completely, still was uncomfortable to bring quickly up to my eye...I had to kind of wrestle with it a bit.

Part of the problem is I'm very tall (6' 5"), so the camera sits above my hip, just under my ribcage :(


Canon 60D
- EF-S 18-55mm
ƒ3.5-5.6 IS • Tamron AF 70-300mm ƒ4-5.6 SP Di VC USD XLD • Pentax SMC-M 50mm ƒ1.4 (via adapter)

- Kenko Teleplus MC4 DG 2x teleconverter

- Manfrotto 055XPROB • Manfrotto 496RC2

  
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Snydremark
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Mar 11, 2012 13:01 |  #4

There have been many, many more silly questions asked :)

Some use one of the many "sling" style straps, like:
The OpTech (external link) that Mike mentions
The Cinch from Luma Labs (external link)
Something from Sun Sniper (external link), or
Black Rapid (external link)

If a sling strap isn't your style, some other, alternative carrier systems are available from:
Cotton Carrier (external link)
Spider Holster (external link)
Capture Clip (external link)

I've, personally, used a couple of different iterations of the Black Rapid products, the Cotton Carrier system and the Capture Clip.

I've finally settled on the Capture Clip, with a Black Rapid BR-4 as a backup solution for when I want the camera with me but don't want to or can't carry my backpack with me.


- Eric S.: My Birds/Wildlife (external link) (7D MkII/5D IV, Canon 10-22 f/3.5-4.5, Canon 24-105L f/4 IS, Canon 70-200L f/2.8 IS MkII, Canon 100-400L f/4.5-5.6 IS I/II)
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mike_d
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Mar 11, 2012 13:03 |  #5

canadave wrote in post #14067079 (external link)
So if you wear it the camera on its lengthened traditional strap across your body, do you find it difficult to bring the camera up to your eye? I tried this the other day, and maybe it was the bulky winter coat I was wearing, but the strap (the default Canon strap), even lengthened completely, still was uncomfortable to bring quickly up to my eye...I had to kind of wrestle with it a bit.

I like the camera to rest right where my hand naturally falls. This puts it fairly low (think Han Solo's blaster). The Canon strap wasn't long enough even without a coat so I added some extensions my OpTech's strap. Their sling can get it pretty low too.

When I got the heavy lens and ditched the Canon strap, I got this: http://optechusa.com/s​traps/pro-strap.html (external link). The pad is thicker but still puts all the weight on your neck.

Then I got some of these http://optechusa.com …-connectors/uni-loop.html (external link) to move the quick disconnect closer to the camera and some of these http://optechusa.com …tors/extensions​-1041.html (external link) to make the strap long enough to to wear across my body.

Then I got this http://optechusa.com …strap-adaptor/category/3/ (external link) to turn it into a sliding sling in the style of the Black Rapid.

Now I'm considering the Cinch (http://luma-labs.com/products/cinc​h (external link)). Its more like my first OpTech setup but can be shortened on the fly for when you need more stability. I'm waiting for them to release their quick-disconnect add-on before I decide.




  
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sandpiper
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Mar 11, 2012 13:04 as a reply to  @ mike_d's post |  #6

I carry mine various ways, but usually around my neck. However, many times, I will be carrying two so one may be around my neck and the other slung over a shoulder (same side as camera). If I have two long lenses on, and I am going to be walking a distance before likely to use one, I will sling one over each shoulder (same side in each case) as it takes the weight from my neck and stops all that bouncing off the chest malarky as well.

Yes, you do need to exercise a little caution with the "slung over the same shoulder" technique, as they can slide off, but you quickly learn to bring your arm up (as if punching upwards) when it slips, so it just hangs off your arm or the crook of your elbow, then you reseat it on the shoulder. The trick is (when carrying two this way) not to lean over as you save it, to try and keep it on the shoulder, as then the other one falls off as well and you end up trying to juggle them.

The safest way is both around my neck, but that gets uncomfortable over long periods, especially with big lenses on both, and they do tend to get scuffed as they keep banging into each other as they bounce off the chest.

I have however, managed several years of this without breaking anything (yet) and they are probably more at risk when I stand them on the ground (lens pointing down and bodies up in the air for ready grabbing) as they get kicked over on occasion.




  
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canadave
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Mar 11, 2012 13:27 |  #7

wow, thanks guys! Excellent information there. I like the R-strap concept best, but the price...ouch, my wife would hit me over the head with the camera ;) (it'd be different if I were a pro photog).

I'm looking into some DIY R-straps, including a thread I just found on these forums. I notice that in the photos, both ends of the strap attach to a single side strap attachment point on the camera. I have my strap attached in what I'd always assumed is the "conventional way", using both left and right side attachment points on the camera, one for each end of the strap. Is that not how it's usually done?


Canon 60D
- EF-S 18-55mm
ƒ3.5-5.6 IS • Tamron AF 70-300mm ƒ4-5.6 SP Di VC USD XLD • Pentax SMC-M 50mm ƒ1.4 (via adapter)

- Kenko Teleplus MC4 DG 2x teleconverter

- Manfrotto 055XPROB • Manfrotto 496RC2

  
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mike_d
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Mar 11, 2012 13:57 |  #8

I don't know about DIY R-straps, but all of the slings I know of have one connection from the camera to the strap and rely on a slider. If you're attaching both ends of a strap to the camera, then wouldn't the whole strap have to move with the camera? The idea of a sling is that the strap stays in place, with the pad always on your shoulder, and the camera slides along the strap. If you want to try out a sling without spending a lot of money, OpTech's version is only $25.




  
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CalPiker
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Mar 11, 2012 14:23 |  #9

I have just a standard strap on my camera, but it is a little longer than the Canon one. It is the free neoprene strap from Smugmug. I normally carry it around my neck in front of me, but when I walk I turn the lens to point to my left and use my left hand to hold it in place. If I find myself not using my camera for a little while, but don't want to put it back in my bag, I stick my left arm through the strap and move the camera under my left arm. The camera will also sit right on top of my bag, which sits on my left side with the strap on my right shoulder.


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Channel ­ One
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Mar 11, 2012 15:02 |  #10

canadave wrote in post #14067039 (external link)
When you go out walking with your dSLR, how do you carry it?

When working stills I carry two bodies and both have Domke Gripper straps on them extended to as far out as the straps will allow, being as I am right handed, the primary camera strap will be wrapped around my right forearm a couple of times, that way should I lose the grip on the camera, the strap will break the fall before the body bounces on the pavement, I keep the secondary camera slung over my left shoulder with the lens facing in toward me, of course this exposes the rear of the body to all kinds of bumps and thumps so a LCD protector is a mandatory, carrying the backup body this way allows me to just drop the primary camera, which does a bungee jump on the strap while my left hand brings up the backup and hands it my waiting right hand while the primary camera tethers along for the ride, once done with the secondary camera, I let it go and it drops back to my side and I re-grip the primary.

Wayne


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rick_reno
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Mar 11, 2012 19:30 |  #11

Potn optech strap, around town it's around neck hangs on my side. If I'm where I don't want people to see its in a bike messenger bag




  
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LowriderS10
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Mar 11, 2012 19:39 |  #12

strap on right shoulder, camera on left side (so strap is a / across my chest/back)...easy to control and access, and doesn't leave enough slack for the camera to bump into random things. I've been doing it for so many years, that I instinctively cover the camera/lens with my left hand in crowded places/tight spots to protect it from impact...


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green_tooth
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Mar 11, 2012 20:16 |  #13

I just wrap neckstrap around my arm and I cary camera in my hand. I put it aroung neck only when I am changing lenses. If I don't plan to take any photos, I keep it in my bag.


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tonylong
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Mar 11, 2012 22:26 |  #14

If I'm actively shooting and walking with one body then I'll just hang the camera to the front -- I don't have issues with the Canon straps being too short, although I know plenty of people here use the alternative with great results.

I generally have a backpack, a "standard" one that can hold a body or two and 2/3 lenses, or a "photography" backpack with compartments and also will "take" a monopod or tripod. Either of those can be useful for an extended walk or a bike ride, but of course it means stopping and getting into the pack if you want to shoot:)!


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jra
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Mar 11, 2012 22:49 |  #15

Actually a good question....I guess everyone has their favorite ways of doing things. I use the "R-Strap" for events and hired work but for a simple walk with nothing particular in mind, I mount my camera to a tripod and simply carry the tripod over my shoulder with the camera mounted on the end. I can set down the tripod in a matter of seconds and should a shot need me to remove the camera from the tripod, I can do that within a second or two. When I'm out looking for photos, I generally prefer to use a tripod and frame carefully so this method works best for me.
I've gotten so fast with this method that I can stop, set it up, frame my shot (which was envisioned before setting down the tripod), shoot and pick up my tripod to be on my way in less than 10 seconds......not quite as fast as an R-Strap but much more precise :)




  
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newb question--how do you carry your camera?
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