Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 23 Mar 2012 (Friday) 03:29
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

The purpose of having more than one DSLR?

 
amfoto1
Cream of the Crop
10,249 posts
Likes: 78
Joined Aug 2007
Location: San Jose, California
     
Mar 23, 2012 08:28 |  #16

jeaniulani wrote in post #14137623 (external link)
So I'm not a professional photographer by any means. Any photos I take or make money off of are more like a side business for me. I've gone from using a 7d which I sold to using a 5d mark ii the last few months. I went and purchased the 5d mark iii today presale. I sold a few lenses I never used or that were for APS-C sensors so I can't use them anymore. When I was doing that, the guy at my local camera shop who is awesome asked why I wasn't selling my 5d mark ii. That made me think... I had kind of just thought I would keep it as a "back up" camera but I don't know how often I'll end up using it once I get my 5d mark iii.

I know a lot of people have more than one because of the type of photography that they do ie weddings, etc. I am doing more portrait photography these days as well as outdoors photography and I am torn now on whether I should keep it as a secondary or backup or sell it. I don't NEED the extra money because I was super lucky and sold some great shots recently that helped me fund my 5d mark iii but at the same time, having extra money in the bank doesn't hurt.

I wanted to know your opinions on having more than one DSLR and for those of you who have more than one, do you use the other camera often and what for. I just need help trying to figure out if I should keep it or if I should sell it. hmm

If you are selling your work or working for pay at all, by definition you are acting as a professional photographer. So just accept that and move on.

Part of being a professional is being dependable and never failing to deliver for your clients and customers. Often that means having more than one camera, in case anything ever goes wrong with the main one you shoot with.

There are also times when it's handy to have multiple cameras set up for use, to be able to quickly switch back and forth between the lenses you have mounted on them. I use a pair of 7Ds for sports/action photography. Usually they are set up with 70-200 and 300mm lenses or with 24-70 and 70-200. I also use a 5DII for other types of photography. And I have several older cameras as backups for myself or others who are helping me with larger jobs.


Alan Myers (external link) "Walk softly and carry a big lens."
5DII, 7DII(x2), 7D(x2) & other cameras. 10-22mm, Tokina 12-24/4, 20/2.8, TS 24/3.5L, 24-70/2.8L, 28/1.8, 28-135 IS (x2), TS 45/2.8, 50/1.4, Tamron 60/2.0, 70-200/4L IS, 70-200/2.8 IS, 85/1.8, Tamron 90/2.5 Macro, 100/2.8 USM, 100-400L II, 135/2L, 180/3.5L, 300/4L IS (x2), 300/2.8L IS, 500/4L IS, EF 1.4X II, EF 2X II. Flashes, studio strobes & various access. - FLICKR (external link) - ZENFOLIO (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
melcat
Goldmember
1,122 posts
Likes: 5
Joined Nov 2010
Location: Melbourne, Australia
     
Mar 23, 2012 08:59 |  #17

1. To have a camera available if one needs repair (this has happened once).

2. To have two cameras which can do different things, in my case a 1.3 crop with fast frame rate and a full frame. Canon made me do this.

3. To be able to keep a super-precision focussing screen in one body while retaining the brighter screen in another for slower lens combinations. Those are also long lenses, so the 1.3 crop is the one with the stock screen in it.

4. To have a camera left set to shoot JPEG for eBay etc. If I did this with my main camera, I'd forget.

Some of these won't apply to you.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
booja
Goldmember
1,638 posts
Likes: 95
Joined Jan 2008
Location: houston, tx
     
Mar 23, 2012 09:10 |  #18

i have 2 bodies only bc i shoot weddings on the side. i put my 35L on one 5d and my 70-200 2.8L II or my 85L on the other 5d.

i also shoot portraits and automotive and for these i just use 1 body, pointless to have 2 when you are not in a crunch for time to get the shot.

its nice to know you have a backup "IF" something were to happen to your main camera. but if you shoot for fun and its just a hobby it seems a bit much. i havent been shooting long... maybe like 5-6 years. i have never had a camera fail on me just because... if anything my battery goes dead or my card goes full. thats about it... but accidents do happen. so it just depends how important it is to you if youre shooting for fun. if you do a lot of paid stuff it proabably is necessary.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
rick_reno
Cream of the Crop
44,636 posts
Likes: 124
Joined Dec 2010
     
Mar 23, 2012 09:13 |  #19

I don't like the hassle of selling stuff, we've got a 40D in a closet here somewhere that doesn't see any use.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
RPCrowe
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
7,856 posts
Likes: 693
Joined Nov 2005
Location: San Diego County, California, USA
     
Mar 23, 2012 10:48 |  #20

I am an old time photographer and am used to shooting with at least two 35mm film cameras because when I was shooting 35mm film, there were no zoom lenses worthy of consideration. Using at least a pair of 35mm cameras with prime lenses gave me some flexibility...

Some associates of mine, covering combat operations in Vietnam shot with up to four cameras, although most of them limited themselves to three. Since I have trouble walking and chewing gum at the same time, I usually limited myself to a pair of cameras...

I now shoot with two cameras because I like the flexibility of an extremely wide focal range at my finger tips. Of course, I could use a wide focal range zoom lens but, the drawbacks to using this type of lens are: slower aperture, and often, slower autofocus and inferior IQ...

I normally shoot with 17-55mm f/2.8 IS and 70-200mm f/4L IS lenses on a pair of 1.6x cameras for my walk around and travel photography. If I were shooting weddings, I would choose full frame cameras with a 24-70mm f/2.8L and a 70-200mm f/2.8L IS ii lens...

As far as weight goes.... The 70-200mm f/4L lens AND A SECOND 1.6X Camera, weighs the same as the 70-200mm f2.8L (series) lens alone...

Another VERY IMPORTANT REASON that I prefer to carry and shoot with a pair of cameras is INSURANCE in case of a camera going down. I fell climbing a slippery slope in Alaska and broke my 40D camera. My 30D saved the trip photographically. You don't have to be booney tromping to break a camera. A fellow tour member broke his Nikon by falling on a cobblestone sidewalk in front of the City Walls of Xi'an, China. He had no extra camera and missed out on photography until the tour reached Hong Kong, several cities later where he bought a replacement camera...

A professional photographer has a legal and moral responsibility to ensure that any assignment will be completed and no important shots missed. A broken piece of equipment doesn't release the photographer from that responsibility. A pair of cameras at your finger tips is the only sure way not to miss any required shots...

Finally, never having to (or very seldom having to) switch lenses in the field (which can sometimes be dusty and dirty) maintains my sensors quite clean...

Originally, I fabricated my dual camera straps from leather. They worked O.K. but, there was a problem with sweat and mold, especially in Southeast Asian climates...

Optech introduced a Reporter camera strap which was a duplicate of the leather strap I used to fabricate, but was made of nylon:

http://optechusa.com/s​traps/reporter-strap.html (external link)

The Reporter strap worked O.K. and the cameras did not tangle. The problem with this rig was that both cameras were supported around my neck (which could be a pretty heavy load) and also it was often difficult to carry the lower camera with a flash attached and, almost impossible to carry that camera with a flash and a diffuser reflector attached.

When OPTECH introduced its Dual Harness, I snapped it up and have been very happy with it:

http://optechusa.com/s​traps/dual-harness.html (external link)

The dual harness allows me to have each camera at finger level; ready to grab and shoot. I use a carabiner clip attached to my side adjustment straps of my photo vest and clip one to each camera strap when I need to move quickly. This prevents the camera from swinging as I move. I can carry my cameras with hotshoe flashes and diffusers attached.

OPTECH has now introduced a new harness, the Double Sling, which I have not used:

http://optechusa.com/s​traps/double-sling.html (external link)

If I were shooting weddings, I would definitely look into the Cotton Carrier to carry my two cameras...

http://www.cottoncarri​er.com/ (external link)


See my images at http://rpcrowe.smugmug​.com/ (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Logicus
Senior Member
Avatar
787 posts
Likes: 9
Joined Nov 2010
Location: Independence, KY
     
Mar 23, 2012 10:50 |  #21

It's weird to think that the 5D MarkII has now become a "backup" body!


My Gear List
My flickr (external link)
My flickr photos organized by Lens Used (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sambarino
Senior Member
549 posts
Likes: 2
Joined Feb 2011
     
Mar 23, 2012 11:16 as a reply to  @ Logicus's post |  #22

I have two DSLR for several reasons. My old (T1i) camera gets the brunt of the experimental use. Let me try out this new MF C/Y mount lens; pull out the 'old' camera. Throw a camera in the car 'just in case'; make it the old camera. This saves my new camera (60D) from having to take too much abuse.

The other time I actually use two bodies is in active/dynamic situations. Shooting football from the field or basketball from the end of the court is just easier with two bodies. Basketball: I can put 135L on the 60D to cover tight shots and the other end of the court, While having a 50 or even 24 on the T1i for my end of the court action. Football would be nearly impossible to shoot from the field with one body. I use a long zoom for action on the field, and 2nd body with wide zoom and flash for side lines shots. I do think having two cameras with identical controls would make this a bit more fluid, however.

Two bodies? My wife wishes! All my others are film, though. Yes, I still use them. The ELAN 7NE not so much. With auto everything available, the experience isn't much different than digital. I even look at the back of the camera after most shots. My Yashica FX-2 and FX-3 Super 2000 film bodies get more action these days. Shoot a fully manual (OK, it has a meter!) camera for a day and you will really appreciate digital. You will never again complain about ANY camera that can AF. Try a MF 200+ mm lens and you will love IS all over again. I just wish it didn't cost $10 every time I load a roll of film.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
riffster
Senior Member
Avatar
370 posts
Gallery: 14 photos
Best ofs: 2
Likes: 568
Joined Apr 2009
Location: Ohio
     
Mar 23, 2012 12:59 |  #23

I have two camera bodies not because I fear one will fail but generally for quick access to alternately set up cameras / video camera supported systems. When I upgrade I will then have 2 video cameras as well. If you shoot video you can appreciate the immense value of having 2 highly capable video/ still cameras.


5DII | 7D | C100mkII | Tokina 16-28 2.8 I Canon 24-70L | Canon 70-200L 2.8 | Canon 85 1.8 | Sigma 30 1.4 www.riffster.com (external link) www.facebook.com/riffs​terproductions (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
jeaniulani
THREAD ­ STARTER
Member
Avatar
79 posts
Joined Apr 2010
Location: Honolulu, HI
     
Mar 23, 2012 13:32 |  #24

RPCrowe wrote in post #14139175 (external link)
I am an old time photographer and am used to shooting with at least two 35mm film cameras because when I was shooting 35mm film, there were no zoom lenses worthy of consideration. Using at least a pair of 35mm cameras with prime lenses gave me some flexibility...

Some associates of mine, covering combat operations in Vietnam shot with up to four cameras, although most of them limited themselves to three. Since I have trouble walking and chewing gum at the same time, I usually limited myself to a pair of cameras...

I now shoot with two cameras because I like the flexibility of an extremely wide focal range at my finger tips. Of course, I could use a wide focal range zoom lens but, the drawbacks to using this type of lens are: slower aperture, and often, slower autofocus and inferior IQ...

I normally shoot with 17-55mm f/2.8 IS and 70-200mm f/4L IS lenses on a pair of 1.6x cameras for my walk around and travel photography. If I were shooting weddings, I would choose full frame cameras with a 24-70mm f/2.8L and a 70-200mm f/2.8L IS ii lens...

As far as weight goes.... The 70-200mm f/4L lens AND A SECOND 1.6X Camera, weighs the same as the 70-200mm f2.8L (series) lens alone...

Another VERY IMPORTANT REASON that I prefer to carry and shoot with a pair of cameras is INSURANCE in case of a camera going down. I fell climbing a slippery slope in Alaska and broke my 40D camera. My 30D saved the trip photographically. You don't have to be booney tromping to break a camera. A fellow tour member broke his Nikon by falling on a cobblestone sidewalk in front of the City Walls of Xi'an, China. He had no extra camera and missed out on photography until the tour reached Hong Kong, several cities later where he bought a replacement camera...

A professional photographer has a legal and moral responsibility to ensure that any assignment will be completed and no important shots missed. A broken piece of equipment doesn't release the photographer from that responsibility. A pair of cameras at your finger tips is the only sure way not to miss any required shots...

Finally, never having to (or very seldom having to) switch lenses in the field (which can sometimes be dusty and dirty) maintains my sensors quite clean...

Originally, I fabricated my dual camera straps from leather. They worked O.K. but, there was a problem with sweat and mold, especially in Southeast Asian climates...

Optech introduced a Reporter camera strap which was a duplicate of the leather strap I used to fabricate, but was made of nylon:

http://optechusa.com/s​traps/reporter-strap.html (external link)

The Reporter strap worked O.K. and the cameras did not tangle. The problem with this rig was that both cameras were supported around my neck (which could be a pretty heavy load) and also it was often difficult to carry the lower camera with a flash attached and, almost impossible to carry that camera with a flash and a diffuser reflector attached.

When OPTECH introduced its Dual Harness, I snapped it up and have been very happy with it:

http://optechusa.com/s​traps/dual-harness.html (external link)

The dual harness allows me to have each camera at finger level; ready to grab and shoot. I use a carabiner clip attached to my side adjustment straps of my photo vest and clip one to each camera strap when I need to move quickly. This prevents the camera from swinging as I move. I can carry my cameras with hotshoe flashes and diffusers attached.

OPTECH has now introduced a new harness, the Double Sling, which I have not used:

http://optechusa.com/s​traps/double-sling.html (external link)

If I were shooting weddings, I would definitely look into the Cotton Carrier to carry my two cameras...

http://www.cottoncarri​er.com/ (external link)


Thanks for all the links!!! I am now pondering which harness I want to get. I hope that someday I have as much knowledge and experience as you do!!! Not having to switch lenses on the field because I will have two cameras is such a great point that I overlooked when considering whether or not I should sell my 5D MK II. Thank you so much for your advice and all the information!!!


Jean | Canon 5D Mark III + Grip | 5D Mark II + Grip
24-70 f /2.8 L | 16-35 f /2.8 L IS II| 70-200 f /2.8 L IS II | 135 f /2 L | 85 f /1.8 | 50 f /1.4 | 100 f /2.8 L IS
Canon Extender EF 2x III (Tele Extender) - U.S.A. | 580EX II | 580EX
Gallery: http://www.whatjeanlik​esphotography.com (external link) Blog: http://www.whatjeanlik​es.com (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Amamba
Goldmember
Avatar
3,675 posts
Gallery: 8 photos
Likes: 48
Joined Nov 2007
Location: SE MI
     
Mar 23, 2012 17:01 |  #25

I can perfectly understand someone having two bodies in a full time photography business, or doing weddings which are once in a lifetime (for that particular couple you're shooting, anyway) event.

If all you do is occasional portraits, it's up to you. The probability of your camera crapping out on you in the middle of a shoot is low, and there's nothing you can't re-schedule. Is it really worth having a cost equivalent of a nice lens tied up in a "backup" body ?


Ex-Canon shooter. Now Sony Nex.
Life Lessons: KISS. RTFM. Don't sweat the small stuff.
My Gear List (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
hammer2k
Senior Member
353 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Mar 2009
Location: West TN
     
Mar 23, 2012 21:21 |  #26

You could always sell/trade the 5DII and move down to the 5D classic as a cheaper back-up camera. The 5D classic can be bought for around $750-800 and you would pocket the difference.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
melcat
Goldmember
1,122 posts
Likes: 5
Joined Nov 2010
Location: Melbourne, Australia
     
Mar 23, 2012 21:26 |  #27

hammer2k wrote in post #14142596 (external link)
You could always sell/trade the 5DII and move down to the 5D classic as a cheaper back-up camera. The 5D classic can be bought for around $750-800 and you would pocket the difference.

Canon swapped some of the buttons when they went from the original 5D to the 5D Mk II - same positions, different functions, and asking for trouble to swap between the two. It was why I never considered adding a Mk II to my kit.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Joe300
Senior Member
Avatar
519 posts
Joined Apr 2008
Location: WV, SC, VA & NY
     
Mar 23, 2012 22:03 |  #28

Hello group,
Once I was out shooting a wedding and right in the middle of the event my shutter crap out on me.
What a feeling, so I grab my second body that was in my bag and I saved my butt with a second body.

Now I have a 40D, 50D & 7D with me all the time.. but use two bodies with two different lens while shooting sports,etc..

Joe


A lot of Canon gear=300D & 1Dmkiii, Lens and some studio gear,
WL x1600 etc.
Two Bronica SQ-Ai outfit too! 'Old School'
www.joelaroccaphotogra​phy.com (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

2,900 views & 0 likes for this thread
The purpose of having more than one DSLR?
FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is brotherbear86
834 guests, 361 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 6430, that happened on Dec 03, 2017

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.