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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
Thread started 26 Mar 2012 (Monday) 02:55
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Diopter revelation, not sure what to do

 
Polarized
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Mar 26, 2012 02:55 |  #1
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Okay first revelation #1: with a 50mm lens on my 50D... it's literally the same focal length as my eye. If I have both eyes open, right eye looking through the camera, it feels like normal vision.

Now with that said, so far I've had my diopter adjusted ALL the way to the left (the - side) because that made the AF boxes/text readout the clearest/sharpest.

But then I just tried an experiment where I left both my eyes open, lined up an images so they look like one image to my eyes as I would when I normally look at things, and the right image, through the camera, was totally blurry. I then closed my left eye and realized my right eye has to adjust everytime to make things clear through the viewfinder.

So I suppose it would be better to adjust it so things are in focus when my eye is relaxed right?




  
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Steveod
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Mar 26, 2012 03:06 |  #2

Correct.


Steveod:shock: 1D Classic,1Ds, 400D. EOS-1n, EOS-5 Minolta Autocord,Yashica-A,Yashica-mat 66 Yashica-mat 124G ,Rolleicord IV & VB ,Mamiya C3,Mamiya C33, and a heap of other gear I keep collecting and collecting,Hi I am Steve and I am a photoholic http://www.flickr.com/​photos/steveod2007/ (external link)

  
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Polarized
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Mar 26, 2012 03:28 |  #3
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Steveod wrote in post #14154161 (external link)
Correct.

god i was going nuts thinking my eyes were messed up..phew




  
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Steveod
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Mar 26, 2012 03:44 |  #4

They are just use one at a time and you will be fine


Steveod:shock: 1D Classic,1Ds, 400D. EOS-1n, EOS-5 Minolta Autocord,Yashica-A,Yashica-mat 66 Yashica-mat 124G ,Rolleicord IV & VB ,Mamiya C3,Mamiya C33, and a heap of other gear I keep collecting and collecting,Hi I am Steve and I am a photoholic http://www.flickr.com/​photos/steveod2007/ (external link)

  
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Lowner
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Mar 26, 2012 05:54 |  #5

To me a 50mm lens on a full-frame body is a little wider angle than my normal eye.


Richard

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John ­ from ­ PA
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Mar 26, 2012 07:28 |  #6

In the days of 35mm film, the 50mm focal length was/is referred to as a "standard lens" meaning it roughly matches the field of view of the human eye. Today however, if you’re lucky enough to own a full frame digital camera, then a 50mm prime lens is still a standard lens and still offers a field of view very similar to the eye. Full frame digital cameras are more expensive than dslr with reduced size sensors so many of us own cameras with smaller sensors, like the Rebels, 60D, etc..

The 50mm lens on one of these cameras effectively becomes a short telephoto lens. For instance a nifty 50mm on a 60D yield an effective field of view of 80mm. Not necessarily bad as 80 mm was a very common focal length (for FF) used for portraiture work. But for the cropped sensor cameras something around 30mm to 35mm (assuming a 1.6 crop factor) is closer to what the human eye will see.




  
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Polarized
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Mar 26, 2012 07:32 as a reply to  @ John from PA's post |  #7
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Are you talking about how wide of a view? Because when I look through the viewfinder of my 50d the distance to the subject is identical with my left eye. It looks like I'm looking through a monical. Subjects are same size to both eyes




  
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JeffreyG
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Mar 26, 2012 07:43 |  #8

Lowner wrote in post #14154452 (external link)
To me a 50mm lens on a full-frame body is a little wider angle than my normal eye.

This of course depends on the magnification of the viewfinder.

Canon quotes their viewfinder magnification with a 50mm lens mounted. So the 5D has a viewfinder of 0.71X. This means that with a 50mm lens mounted to the camera, objects seen through the viewfinder will be 71% of the size that they appear to the naked eye.

If you were to mount a 70mm lens to the 5D, the objects seen through the viewfinder would be the same size as those seen through the naked eye.

Different cameras have different viewfinder magnifications. I think the very best 35mm format ones were the OM-1 and OM-2 at something close to 0.95X. These would look very close to 1:1 with a 50mm lens mounted.

Also note that the smaller format Canon EOS bodies often have viewfinder magnifications in the range of 0.95 to 1.0X. This means they are close to 1:1 with a 50mm lens mounted. But then when you consider that 50mm on 1.6X format gives the same AOV as 80mm on 35mm format, you realize these viewfinders are not bigger than the one on the 5D. In fact, on all but the 7D they are smaller.


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ErgoSpacePig
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Mar 26, 2012 07:57 |  #9

John from PA wrote in post #14154698 (external link)
In the days of 35mm film, the 50mm focal length was/is referred to as a "standard lens" meaning it roughly matches the field of view of the human eye. Today however, if you’re lucky enough to own a full frame digital camera, then a 50mm prime lens is still a standard lens and still offers a field of view very similar to the eye. Full frame digital cameras are more expensive than dslr with reduced size sensors so many of us own cameras with smaller sensors, like the Rebels, 60D, etc..

The 50mm lens on one of these cameras effectively becomes a short telephoto lens. For instance a nifty 50mm on a 60D yield an effective field of view of 80mm. Not necessarily bad as 80 mm was a very common focal length (for FF) used for portraiture work. But for the cropped sensor cameras something around 30mm to 35mm (assuming a 1.6 crop factor) is closer to what the human eye will see.

this is not correct, a 50mm lens is a 50 mm lens no matter what sensor you use, on a APS-C sensor the field of view (fov) is cropped compared to a Full Frame sensor and when viewed on you monitor gives the illusion that it is zoomed in, but the length of the lens does not change.

bob


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MakisM1
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Mar 26, 2012 08:28 |  #10

John from PA wrote in post #14154698 (external link)
In the days of 35mm film, the 50mm focal length was/is referred to as a "standard lens" meaning it roughly matches the field of view of the human eye. Today however, if you’re lucky enough to own a full frame digital camera, then a 50mm prime lens is still a standard lens and still offers a field of view very similar to the eye. Full frame digital cameras are more expensive than dslr with reduced size sensors so many of us own cameras with smaller sensors, like the Rebels, 60D, etc..

The 50mm lens on one of these cameras effectively becomes a short telephoto lens. For instance a nifty 50mm on a 60D yield an effective field of view of 80mm. Not necessarily bad as 80 mm was a very common focal length (for FF) used for portraiture work. But for the cropped sensor cameras something around 30mm to 35mm (assuming a 1.6 crop factor) is closer to what the human eye will see.

ErgoSpacePig wrote in post #14154810 (external link)
this is not correct, a 50mm lens is a 50 mm lens no matter what sensor you use, on a APS-C sensor the field of view (fov) is cropped compared to a Full Frame sensor and when viewed on you monitor gives the illusion that it is zoomed in, but the length of the lens does not change.

bob

Thats why John is using the word 'effectively' and he is clear, concise and correct. You are saying practically the same things, in a much more cofusing way.

The lenses are light benders, they don't care what sensor lies behind them. Their focal length is their characteristic and does not change with the type of sensor that lies behind them.

The sensors are light collectors and don't care what light bender is in front of them.

The photographer (hopefully with some knowledge and skill) combines the two to produce an image and not an illusion.

Regards,


Gerry
Canon 5D MkIII/Canon 60D/Canon EF-S 18-200/Canon EF 24-70L USM II/Canon EF 70-200L 2.8 USM II/Canon EF 50 f1.8 II/Σ 8-16/ 430 EXII
OS: Linux Ubuntu/PostProcessing: Darktable/Image Processing: GIMP

  
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Diopter revelation, not sure what to do
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